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Crime D.C. Man on a Date Is Attacked with Glass Bottle in Possible Anti-LGBTQ Hate Crime, Police Say

00:40  22 june  2021
00:40  22 june  2021 Source:   people.com

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A D.C. man was hit over the head with a glass beer bottle while walking with a date Friday in what police are investigating as a suspected LGBTQ hate crime.

a police car parked in front of a building: Getty © Provided by People Getty

According to a police incident report obtained by PEOPLE, Aaron Arnwine was walking with a male date in Northeast D.C. on June 18 when they were approached by a suspect yelling homophobic slurs.

Police said the suspect then approached Arnwine and struck him in the back of the head with a glass beer bottle.

"I noticed him running toward me out of the corner of my eye and then he broke a beer bottle over the back of my head," Arnwine told FOX 5. "I'm praying for God to change his heart, that he realizes that violence, initiating violence over something that petty is stupid and that there are consequences to that."

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  TV animators were forced to scrap LGBTQ-inclusive storylines due to a culture of fear. Experts say fans are changing that. Despite industry fears and discriminatory red tape, inclusion is happening thanks to fans and "brave creators," experts say.But when the show's studio, Nelvana, pivoted the Nickelodeon series to center four teenage girls who become heroes known as Mysticons, instead of boys, Jara swapped his nearly all-male team for more women and LGBTQ writers to ensure the story onscreen was more accurately told.

a police car parked in front of a building: The assault is the third suspected anti-LGBTQ hate crime in D.C. this month © Getty The assault is the third suspected anti-LGBTQ hate crime in D.C. this month

The suspect took off after the attack and was seen running through an alleyway. No suspect has been arrested in the assault and the investigation is ongoing.

This is the third suspected anti-LGBTQ hate crime attack this June.

On June 12, a 13-year-old male brandished a machete and threatened a gay man while he was dining.

According to the incident report, the teen approached the victim "while appearing to stab cicadas on the ground" and then "stating 'I'll silence you' and motioning the large knife at [the victim]." The teen was arrested and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

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On June 6, a transgender woman was attacked by three people at a laundromat, FOX 5 reports. The victim told police she was stabbed in the head. All three suspects were arrested and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

Capt. David Hong, head of MPD's special liaison branch, told Fox 5 that the three incidents were not connected.

NYC Pride ban on uniformed police reflects a deeper tension .
NEW YORK (AP) — For decades, when LGBTQ people have gathered to take part in New York City’s annual Pride march, they’ve made their presence known with every color and type of clothing imaginable. But soon, there's going to be something off-limits: police uniforms. As the city's annual Pride weekend approaches, a recent decision by organizers of New York City's event to ban LGBTQ police officers from marching in uniform in future parades has put a spotlight on issues of identity and belonging, power and marginalization.For some, cops shouldn't have a uniformed presence at a march commemorating the 1969 Stonewall uprising, sparked by a police raid on a gay bar.

usr: 8
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