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Crime Deputy Returns to Duty After Video Appears to Show Him Choking Out Suspect Unconscious

03:21  24 july  2021
03:21  24 july  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

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The cop has been removed from duty after the video seems to show him beating a suspect , authorities said. A Sacramento police officer has been relieved of his duties after cell phone video appeared to capture him tackling and High-scoring Dallas Stars forward Alexander Radulov will not return this season because he needs surgery to repair You think you can wiggle your way out of this.

Cellphone video shows several officers restraining the man on his stomach, and one of the officers appears to have his arm wrapped around the man's neck. "Stop choking him," a bystander can be heard shouting at the officers. Late Sunday, the man was hospitalized and receiving care, a A law enforcement source said the incident occurred after a 911 report that three men were harassing people and throwing objects at them. The officers tried to detain the man after he approached them with a bag, the source said. The City Council passed an anti-chokehold law Thursday to criminalize the use of the

a man holding a sign: A sheriff who appears to have choked a suspect unconscious this month is back on-duty after an investigation found he didn't violate use of force policy. © Kaybe70/Getty Images A sheriff who appears to have choked a suspect unconscious this month is back on-duty after an investigation found he didn't violate use of force policy.

A sheriff's deputy in North Carolina who appears to have choked a suspect unconscious last week will be returning to his post, law enforcement officials announced Friday.

In the video of the July 16 incident, it looks as if the deputy uses a chokehold on the suspect, Cole Ray Carter, until he passes out.

But the Burke County Sheriff's Office said Friday that after conducting an investigation into the incident, it "did not find that the deputy used a hold that restricted Mr. Carter's ability to breathe." And after reviewing footage of the incident, the local district attorney declined to prosecute the deputy involved.

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The New York Police Department banned chokeholds in 1993. (Representational). New York: A New York City police officer has been suspended after a video posted online showed him apparently rendering a Black man unconscious in a chokehold after the city council voted to make it a crime for police to use the grip. New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea called the apparent chokehold incident during an arrest "disturbing" and said the officer was suspended without pay on Sunday, pending a full investigation.

– An East Tennessee sheriff says a deputy has been fired after a photo was published that appears to show him choking a college student who was charged with public intoxication and resisting arrest. Knox County Sheriff Jimmy Jones said in a statement Sunday that he believes 47-year-old Frank Phillips used "excessive force" during the arrest Saturday night and that the deputy has been terminated. The caption says the deputy , whose hands appear to be around the suspect 's neck, rendered him unconscious .

The incident took place on July 16, when sheriff's deputies attempted to arrest Carter on an outstanding warrant for "communicating threats." Carter, who had been walking on Miller Bridge Road in Connelly, North Carolina, allegedly "became argumentative and combative" and resisted arrest, the sheriff's office said in a statement.

When the deputy threatened to use pepper spray, Carter grabbed it, according to the sheriff's office. Carter pressed the spray's trigger, firing it "on the patrol car and both Mr. Carter's and the deputy's shirts," the statement says.

After this occurred, the deputy "reported he was able to move his (deputy's) right arm over Mr. Carter's shoulder with his (deputy's) right forearm under Mr. Carter's chin but not pressed against Mr. Carter's throat."

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Deputies and officers surrounded Ward’s car after a seven-minute, 70-mph chase ended on a dead-end road south of Sebastopol and a struggle ensued to get Ward out of the car, according to the Santa Rosa Police Department, which is conducting an investigation into his death. In December, the Sheriff’s Office released video footage captured by body-worn cameras that showed Ward being pulled through a car window by a deputy who punched him , choked him and slammed his face against the vehicle as a second deputy shocked him multiple times with a Taser.

The video shows two police officers speaking to the woman as she begins to confront one of them before coming face to face with him. It is unclear how the dispute began in the video . "I've immediately initiated an investigation and ordered that the involved officers be relieved of duty . Actions such as these undermine the hard work that we have invested in our community and causes my heart to break for our community and for the vast majority of our officers who dedicate their lives to serving our County.

The office says deputies tried to calm down Carter, who was upset because they did not have a paper copy of the warrant for his arrest.

According to the statement, at this point, the deputy claims that Carter "took the weight off his feet and started falling to the ground."

The sheriff's office stated the deputies seen in the videos from July 16 had received training on its use of force policy this spring. The office also stated, "the deputy reported he was aware of the policy and did not use a strangle or chokehold that would violate the policy."

The deputy involved in the incident was removed from administrative leave and resumed duties on Friday.

The Burke County Sheriff's Office did not name the deputy involved in the incident and did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Newsweek.

A use of force expert interviewed by North Carolina television station WSOC said that after viewing the footage, he didn't think Carter looked "combative" during the altercation.

Army Ranger Charged With Beating, Killing Security Guard, Says He Blacked Out

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LONDON — A police officer in London has been suspended after video footage emerged appearing to show him kneeling on the head and neck of a Black man. Calling the footage "extremely disturbing," Deputy Commissioner Steve House of London's Metropolitan Police said in a statement that "some of He is due to appear in court on Saturday. House said one of the officers had been suspended and another officer "removed from operational duty , but not suspended at this time." "This decision will be kept under review," he added. London Mayor Sadiq Khan called for a swift and thorough inquiry into

Video first uploaded to Facebook showed police officer Jake Perry with his arm around a Camden Fairview High School student's neck, choking him out . In December, a North Carolina school resource officer was fired after a video was shared with a local news station showing the officer brutally body-slamming a middle schooler. Irena Como, acting legal director for the ACLU of North Carolina, said after the assault, "This type of heartbreaking incident is all too common as educators increasingly rely on law enforcement to handle routine disciplinary issues, especially with children of

"When it comes to using the force, you've got to look at the level of resistance or how the person is being combative against the officer or the people they are there to protect versus the level of force the officer would be authorized to use," Lee Ratliff, the founder of a private security service and use of force consultant, told the station.

"As I look at this, I'm not seeing him be combative to the officer, toward the officers. They're having a conversation with him. He's talking to them then all of a sudden, you see him go limp," he added.

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usr: 0
This is interesting!