•   
  •   
  •   

Crime 2 Men Present at Capitol Riot Sentenced to 45 Days in Jail Despite Asking for Leniency

00:31  14 october  2021
00:31  14 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Judge slams claims that Jan. 6 rioters are treated unfairly

  Judge slams claims that Jan. 6 rioters are treated unfairly A Texas man who joined the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan 6. was sentenced Monday to 45 days behind bars even though prosecutors weren't seeking jail time, after the judge blasted comparisons between the riot that day and the Black Lives Matter protests over racial injustice. U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan called it a false equivalence “to compare the actions of people protesting, mostly peacefully, for civil rights” to the mob that "was trying to overthrow the government." She said doing so “ignores the very real danger that the Jan. 6 riots pose to the foundation of our democracy.

6 riot at the Capitol , a judge has ordered two Ohio men to spend 45 days in jail for a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. According to CNN and ABC News, Air Force veteran Derek Jancart and his friend, Erik Rau, were sentenced to 45 days in jail Wednesday by District Judge James Boasberg. Jancart and Rau were not found to have committed any violent acts on Jan. 6. However, prosecutors allege that they had returned to their hotel following a speech by President Donald Trump and quickly returned to the National Mall after seeing that the president's supporters were storming the Capitol .

The jail sentences for Jancart and Rau could become benchmarks for how the courts resolve many other Capitol insurrection prosecutions, a caseload that tops 600 defendants and grows by the week. Like most of the insurrectionists who have pleaded guilty so far, Jancart and Rau aren't accused of Over 80 defendants have pleaded guilty to riot -related offenses, but only seven others besides Jancart and Rau have been sentenced so far. A Florida man who entered the U.S. Senate chamber was sentenced to eight months in prison. Two were sentenced to time served after six months in jail .

Two men who were present at the U.S. Capitol riots were sentenced on Wednesday to 45 days in jail despite pleading for leniency and the recommendation of prosecutors for a shorter sentence, the Associated Press reported.

Two men who participated in the U.S. Capitol riot were sentenced to 45 days in jail by a federal judge on Oct. 13, 2021. A large group of pro-Trump protesters stand on the East steps of the Capitol Building after storming its grounds on Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington © Jon Cherry/Getty Images Two men who participated in the U.S. Capitol riot were sentenced to 45 days in jail by a federal judge on Oct. 13, 2021. A large group of pro-Trump protesters stand on the East steps of the Capitol Building after storming its grounds on Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington

Robert Bauer of Cave City, Kentucky, and his cousin Edward Hemenway of Winchester, Virginia, joined the Capitol riot and posed for photos on top of a military-style government vehicle outside. The two pleaded with the judge for leniency and both admitted to a misdemeanor charge.

‘What You Have Done is Unthinkable’: Judge Sentences Convicted Former Director of ‘Horrific’ Ohio Jail to Nine Months Behind Bars

  ‘What You Have Done is Unthinkable’: Judge Sentences Convicted Former Director of ‘Horrific’ Ohio Jail to Nine Months Behind Bars A former jail director in Ohio is preparing to become a prisoner himself after a judge sentenced him to spend nine months behind bars for creating “inhumane conditions” that led to a string of inmate deaths in 2018. The post ‘What You Have Done is Unthinkable’: Judge Sentences Convicted Former Director of ‘Horrific’ Ohio Jail to Nine Months Behind Bars first appeared on Law & Crime.A former jail director in Ohio is preparing to become a prisoner himself after a judge sentenced him to spend nine months behind bars for creating “inhumane conditions” that led to a string of inmate deaths in 2018.

Two Ohio men were sentenced to serve 45 days in prison after prosecutors requested incarceration for the first time at sentencing hearings for Capitol rioters who took plea deals for nonviolent misdemeanors.Why it matters: Federal judges have debated whether the no-prison plea deals offered to low-level Context: In July, Derek Jancart, an Air Force veteran, and Erik Rau confessed to traveling to Washington with a gas mask and tw0-way radios, and heading to the Capitol after hearing about the riots . The two steelworkers from Columbus can be heard laughing at police officers in video footage

Ongoing tension here in the Jan. 6 cases: Govt says someone like Bissey is a problem because of her willingness to act on conspiracy theories she consumed. Defense counsel argues she should be punished based on conduct that day , not beliefs, as "strange" or "weird" as they are. Chutkan is up, begins by saying she's sorry to hear about Bissey's husband, and echoes what Bissey's lawyer said about the court needing to view each defendant as an individual even though they all participated in the mob that day .

"There's really no words to express how categorically wrong I was that day," said Bauer, who had been inside the Capitol with his cousin for 17 minutes.

Prosecutors had been seeking 30 days in jail, but U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan sentenced them to 45 days for turning their protest into a "violent occupation of the U.S. Capitol" when the country was "attempting the peaceful transfer of power — something that has never been interrupted in this country's history."

"The Capitol does not belong to any one group or any one party," Chutkan said. "That house belongs to the people of the United States and that group that was there that day was there to take it from the people of the United States."

Security Firm, 2 Trump Staffers Under Subpoena Turn Over Documents to January 6 Committee

  Security Firm, 2 Trump Staffers Under Subpoena Turn Over Documents to January 6 Committee Lyndon Brentnall said his firm had "every intention" of complying with the House committee investigating the events of January 6.Lyndon Brentnall, whose firm provided event security at President Donald Trump's Stop the Steal rally on January 6, told the Associated Press, "All the documents and communications requested by the subpoena were handed in.

In the aftermath of the Capitol riots , Lloyd took to Facebook to declare it the 'best day ever'. She ended up pleading guilty last month to a single misdemeanor charge of parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building under a deal with prosecutors. During her sentencing , Lloyd apologized to the court, 'the In a letter to the judge asking for leniency , Lloyd wrote that she was a registered Democrat but that she and her husband began supporting Trump in 2016 because 'he was standing up for what we believe in.' After her arrest, Lloyd's lawyer gave her a list of books and movies to help her 'see what

He only spoke about three sentences to the judge, asking for leniency before receiving his sentence . But the prosecutor on his case and his defense attorney emphasized just how sincere he had been in his cooperation and how much he had reformed his life since his work with Manafort. He will be allowed to serve his jail sentence on weekends or intermittently during his three years of probation. Jackson made clear that the failure of Gates, and his former boss Manafort, to disclose they were lobbying on behalf of Ukrainian clients, and hiding their income from the work, was a significant wrong.

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

In a separate case involving a January 6 Capitol riot defendant, a federal judge held the District of Columbia's corrections director and jail warden in contempt of court Wednesday and asked the Justice Department to investigate whether inmates' civil rights are being abused.

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth had summoned the jail officials as part of the criminal case of Christopher Worrell, a member of the Proud Boys who was charged in the January 6 attack. He was accused of attacking police officers with a pepper spray gel and prosecutors have alleged he traveled to Washington and coordinated with Proud Boys leading up to the siege.

"It's clear to me the civil rights of the defendant were violated by the D.C. Department of Corrections," Lamberth said. "I don't know if it's because he's a January 6 defendant or not."

Alleged Capitol Rioter Asks to Be Freed From Ankle Bracelet, Says It Hinders Exercise Regimen

  Alleged Capitol Rioter Asks to Be Freed From Ankle Bracelet, Says It Hinders Exercise Regimen Joshua Doolin's defense team said during a court hearing that the monitoring bracelet causes him "annoying blisters" and limits his ability to play basketball.During a hearing in Washington, D.C., Doolin argued that the monitoring bracelet he wears on his left leg interferes with his workouts and playing basketball, according to the case file.

The word riot may not carry the emotion you’re looking for, but it was a riot . “ a tumultuous disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons assembled together and acting with a common intent”. I honestly don't think people understand how close they were to pulling this off. They may be the minority in this country, but to successfully complete a coup you only need the right people in the right place at the right time. They had assistance from Capitol police officers, the metro police moved the barricades, and the Pentagon refused to send in reinforcements.

The first of 500 defendants charged over the January 6 riot at the US Capitol has been sentenced to probation and community service, after her lawyer reportedly re-educated her in jail through films and literature. Hundreds of protesters that gathered to support President Donald Trump had broken into the Capitol and disrupted the joint session of Congress meeting to certify Joe Biden’s disputed election victory. Lloyd, an Indiana resident, had described January 6 as the “best day ever” in a Facebook post.

The judge ordered Quincy Booth, the director of the city's Department of Corrections, and Wanda Patten, the warden of the D.C. Jail, to be held in contempt of court. While he did not impose any sanctions or penalties, the judge said he was referring the matter to the Justice Department to investigate whether the civil rights of the inmates in the jail are being violated.

The move is likely to add steam to claims by activists and supporters of former President Donald Trump who have argued that defendants are being treated unfairly while they're locked up. The Associated Press reviewed hundreds of court and jail records for the Capitol riot defendants to uncover how many were being detained and found roughly 70 held in federal custody awaiting trial or sentencing hearings. At least 30 are jailed in Washington. The rest are locked up in facilities across the country.

Supporters of those jailed in Washington held a rally on September 18, where they sought to highlight what they said was the disturbing treatment of suspects behind bars there.

A federal law known as the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act -- commonly called CRIPA -- allows prosecutors to review conditions of jails, prisons and other government-run facilities to identify if there is a systemic pattern of abuse or civil rights violations.

Risky business: Some Capitol riot defendants forgo lawyers

  Risky business: Some Capitol riot defendants forgo lawyers Some of the defendants charged in the storming of the U.S. Capitol are turning away defense lawyers and electing to represent themselves, undeterred by their lack of legal training or repeated warnings from judges. That choice already has led to some curious legal maneuvers and awkward exchanges in court. A New York man charged in the Jan. 6 insurrection wants to bill the government for working on his own case. A Pennsylvania restaurant owner is trying to defend herself from jail. A judge told another New Yorker that he may have incriminated himself during courtroom arguments.

A spokesperson for the Department of Corrections did not respond to a message seeking comment on Wednesday.

The judge's ruling in Worrell's case comes after he found there was more than an "inexcusable" delay of jail officials turning over medical documents. Worrell, who broke his wrist in May, had been recommended for surgery in June but still hasn't undergone the procedure.

After the judge learned last week that the surgery still hadn't happened, he ordered the jail system to turn over notes to the U.S. Marshals Service — because Worrell is a federal inmate housed in the local jail — so the Marshals Service could move forward and approve the medical procedure. But on Tuesday, the jail still hadn't sent the records and the judge ordered the city jail officials to appear in court for a contempt hearing.

A lawyer for the jail had argued that they had been working to get the records together to comply with the court's order before the contempt hearing was set.

"He's needed an operation. He hasn't gotten it," the judge said.

The judge had separately chastised city officials for cutting down the number of rooms in the jail for virtual court visits and for sending an inmate to his court a few weeks ago when they did not have the results of a coronavirus test, saying the "incompetence of jail officials" led to the prisoner being sent back and forth from court without appearing before the judge.

Opinion | Why Is the DOJ Going Easy on Jan. 6 Defendants?

  Opinion | Why Is the DOJ Going Easy on Jan. 6 Defendants? Leniency is not necessarily a bad thing, but politically selective leniency belies the guiding principle of equal justice under law.That question is complicated to answer in the abstract, in part because of the many stages of the criminal process and the corresponding ways in which defendants can be treated comparatively well or poorly.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has set standards for judges to apply in deciding whether to jail a Capitol riot defendant. A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled in March that rioters accused of assaulting officers, breaking through windows, doors and barricades, or playing leadership roles in the attack were in "a different category of dangerousness" than those who merely cheered on the violence or entered the building after it was breached.

Defendants ordered locked up while they await trial include a man accused of dragging a police officer down steps to be beaten by an American flag and another man accused of leading a group of rioters up the Capitol steps to confront officers. But there are more than 630 people charged in the Jan. 6 melee.

Judges have released the vast majority of the defendants, including more than a dozen members and associates of the Oath Keepers, a far-right group, who are charged in perhaps the most serious case brought so far in the attack.

A federal judge held the director of the District of Columbia’s Department of Corrections and the warden of the city’s jail in contempt of court on Wednesday, Oct. 13, and asked the Justice Department to investigate whether the civil rights of inmates are being abused. In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo insurrections loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Jose Luis Magana, File/AP Photo © Jose Luis Magana, File/AP Photo A federal judge held the director of the District of Columbia’s Department of Corrections and the warden of the city’s jail in contempt of court on Wednesday, Oct. 13, and asked the Justice Department to investigate whether the civil rights of inmates are being abused. In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo insurrections loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Jose Luis Magana, File/AP Photo

Related Articles

  • Baltimore Denied Blockage of Conservative Prayer Rally It Says Poses Public Safety Threat
  • Georgia Voters' Ballot Fraud Case Tossed, Official Hails It as a 'Win for Democracy'
  • DOJ Explains to SCOTUS Why It's Fighting to Reinstate Death Sentence for Boston Bomber
  • Boston Marathon Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's Supreme Court Case May Help Derek Chauvin
  • Fauci Warns Vaccine-Hesitant Pilots: Getting COVID Should Be Greater Concern

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Amid the Capitol riot, Facebook faced its own insurrection .
WASHINGTON (AP) — As supporters of Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6th, battling police and forcing lawmakers into hiding, an insurrection of a different kind was taking place inside the world’s largest social media company. Thousands of miles away, in California, Facebook engineers were racing to tweak internal controls to slow the spread of misinformation and inciteful content. Emergency actions — some of which were rolled back after the 2020 election — included banning Trump, freezing comments in groups with a record for hate speech, filtering out the “Stop the Steal” rallying cry and empowering content moderators to act more assertively by labeling the U

usr: 2
This is interesting!