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Crime Couple Charged with Attempting to Sell Nuclear Sub Secrets Appear in Court, Remain in Custody for Now

00:56  14 october  2021
00:56  14 october  2021 Source:   people.com

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A Maryland-based naval nuclear engineer and his schoolteacher wife who were charged with selling secret nuclear power submarine information to someone they believed was a foreign agent made their first appearance in court on Tuesday. © Sketch by William Hennessy Jr. pxl-20211012-163305766-2.jpg. Jonathan and Diana Toebbe appeared separately before a federal magistrate judge in the Northern District of West Virginia, where they were read the espionage-related charges against them and informed of their constitutional rights as defendants.

A US nuclear engineer and his wife appeared in court Tuesday days after their arrest for trying to sell submarine secrets for million, as speculation persisted on which country was the targeted buyer. Both are charged with conspiracy to hand over highly classified technology on the navy's most advanced nuclear -powered, cruise missile-launching submarines to an unnamed foreign power. A criminal complaint unveiled Sunday does not say which country they sought to sell the information to, but suggests that it could be a US ally, disclosing that the country informed the US Federal Bureau of

The Maryland couple accused of an elaborate espionage scheme involving U.S. nuclear submarine secrets will remain behind bars for now, a judge ruled on Tuesday.

West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Jonathan and Diana Toebbe © Provided by People West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Jonathan and Diana Toebbe

Jonathan and Diana Toebbe, who were taken into custody on Saturday, appeared in federal court in Martinsburg, West Virginia, records show.

Both Jonathan, 42, and Diana, 45, have been charged with conspiracy to communicate restricted data and communication of restricted data. (Neither has entered pleas to the charges against them. Their attorneys did not immediately respond to requests for comment.)

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A US nuclear engineer and his wife appeared in court Tuesday days after their arrest for trying to sell submarine secrets for million, as speculation persisted on which country was the targeted buyer. Both are charged with conspiracy to hand over highly classified technology on the navy's most advanced nuclear -powered, cruise missile-launching submarines to an unnamed foreign power. A criminal complaint unveiled Sunday does not say which country they sought to sell the information to, but suggests that it could be a US ally, disclosing that the country informed the US Federal Bureau of

A Maryland-based naval nuclear engineer and his schoolteacher wife who were charged with selling secret nuclear power submarine information to someone they believed was a foreign agent made their first appearance in court on Tuesday. Jonathan and Diana Toebbe appeared separately before a federal He is accused of then corresponding with someone he believed to be an agent of another country, but who was actually an undercover FBI agent. Court documents claim the Navy engineer agreed to sell restricted data to the undercover agent for tens of thousands of dollars in cryptocurrency.

Prosecutors allege in court documents that Jonathan, a nuclear engineer living in Annapolis and working for the Navy, sent information — with his wife's help — about the "design of nuclear-powered warships to a person they believed was a representative of a foreign power."

Jonathan and Diana Toebbe © West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Jonathan and Diana Toebbe

There was no representative — instead, the recipient was an undercover FBI agent, according to prosecutors.

West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Jonathan Toebbe © Provided by People West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Jonathan Toebbe

On Tuesday, Magistrate Judge Robert Trumble ordered the couple to remain in custody pending a hearing later this week when prosecutors and defenders will make more extensive arguments, the court docket shows.

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A US nuclear engineer and his wife appeared in court Tuesday days after their arrest for trying to sell submarine secrets for million, as speculation persisted on which country was the targeted buyer. Both are charged with conspiracy to hand over highly classified technology on the navy's most advanced nuclear -powered, cruise missile-launching submarines to an unnamed foreign power. A criminal complaint unveiled Sunday does not say which country they sought to sell the information to, but suggests that it could be a US ally, disclosing that the country informed the US Federal Bureau of

A US nuclear engineer and his wife appeared in court Tuesday days after their arrest for trying to sell submarine secrets for million, as speculation persisted on which country was the targeted buyer. Both are charged with conspiracy to hand over highly classified technology on the navy's most advanced nuclear -powered, cruise missile-launching submarines to an unnamed foreign power. A criminal complaint unveiled Sunday does not say which country they sought to sell the information to, but suggests that it could be a US ally, disclosing that the country informed the US Federal Bureau of

During the undercover operation, Jonathan allegedly said he would accept $100,000 worth of cryptocurrency in exchange for access to restricted government documents.

In June, he said he was "ready to move forward" with the deal, prosecutors claim.

The FBI said agents observed Jonathan dropping documents at an agreed-upon location in Jefferson County, West Virginia. The agency identified him as a nuclear engineer with an active top secret security clearance through the Department of Defense and an active Q clearance from the Department of Energy.

West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Diana Toebbe © Provided by People West Virginia Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority/AP/Shutterstock Diana Toebbe

According to the criminal complaint, Jonathan's wife was allegedly standing "approximately one meter away" from her husband during the dead drop and appeared to be acting as a lookout.

Once the couple left, the FBI found an SD card placed at the location by Jonathan, according to prosecutors. It was hidden inside a plastic bag-wrapped peanut butter sandwich, the court documents state.

According to the Associated Press, Magistrate Judge Trumble said Tuesday that both Jonathan and Diana could face life in prison if convicted.

China demands information on whether US submarine collision ‘caused a nuclear leak’ .
Chinese officials demanded extensive “details” about a collision involving a U.S. nuclear submarine in the South China Sea, which Beijing cited to continue arguing against American military operations in a region that the rising communist power seeks to dominate. © Provided by Washington Examiner “We are gravely concerned about the incident,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told reporters, per the official transcript. “As the party involved, the U.S. should clarify in specific details what happened, including the exact location of the incident, the U.S.

usr: 3
This is interesting!