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Crime Tool for police reform rarely used by local prosecutors

19:16  21 october  2021
19:16  21 october  2021 Source:   msn.com

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SEATTLE (AP) — Isaiah Obet was behaving erratically and in mental distress in 2017 when Auburn police officer Jeff Nelson ordered his police dog to attack and then shot Obet in the torso. Obet fell to the ground and Nelson fired again, fatally shooting Obet in the head. Police said the officer’s life was in danger because Obet was high on drugs and had a knife. The city later reached a settlement of $1.25 million with Obet’s family.

In this photo provided by the Auburn Police Department via the Port of Seattle Police Department, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson is shown. Nelson has been charged in the killing of Jesse Sarey in 2019, and although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't placed on the King County prosecuting attorney's © Provided by Associated Press Police Reform Brady Lists In this May 31, 2019, photo provided by the Auburn Police Department via the Port of Seattle Police Department, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson, second from right, is shown at the scene where he shot and killed Jesse Sarey in a grocery store parking lot in Auburn, Wash. Although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't placed on the King County Prosecuting Attorney's © Provided by Associated Press In this May 31, 2019, photo provided by the Auburn Police Department via the Port of Seattle Police Department, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson, second from right, is shown at the scene where he shot and killed Jesse Sarey in a grocery store parking lot in Auburn, Wash. Although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't placed on the King County Prosecuting Attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after he was charged in Sarey's killing. (Auburn Police Department via Port of Seattle Police Department via AP)

The next year, Joseph Allen was crossing in front of Nelson’s patrol car when the officer swerved and pinned him against a fence, breaking both his ankles. His justification: Allen was a dangerous criminal.

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In 2019, Nelson scuffled with Jesse Sarey after attempting to arrest him for disorderly conduct. He punched Sarey seven times and then shot him in the torso. After Sarey fell to the ground, Nelson killed him with a second shot to the forehead. He claimed Sarey was on his hands and knees “ready to spring forward,” which later was disproved by both video and witnesses.

Nelson’s actions in all three cases were outlined in a criminal complaint, eyewitness accounts, and police dashcam video obtained by the Associated Press. In the past decade, Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases that involved choking suspects until they passed out, severe dog bites, and physical force that required medical care. But he was not on the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s list that flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct – a designation that must be shared with defense attorneys.

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In this photo, date not known, provided by the Auburn Police Department via the Port of Seattle Police Department, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson is shown. Nelson has been charged in the killing of Jesse Sarey in 2019, and although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't placed on the King County prosecuting attorney's © Provided by Associated Press In this photo, date not known, provided by the Auburn Police Department via the Port of Seattle Police Department, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson is shown. Nelson has been charged in the killing of Jesse Sarey in 2019, and although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't placed on the King County prosecuting attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after he was charged in the killing of Sarey. An Associated Press investigation based on hundreds of documents and interviews with prosecutors, defense attorneys and experts on police reform found that prosecutors do not always used the lists to ensure accountability. (Auburn Police Dept. via Port of Seattle Police Dept. via AP)

Nelson was only added to its “potential impeachment disclosure” list, or Brady List, after he was charged with killing Sarey. A trial is set for February 2022. Mohammad Hamoudi, a federal public defender, said given Officer Nelson’s history, all of his cases should be reviewed. And he hopes his story will encourage prosecutors to track excessive force cases involving other police officers.

Tool for police reform rarely used by local prosecutors

  Tool for police reform rarely used by local prosecutors SEATTLE (AP) — Isaiah Obet was behaving erratically and in mental distress in 2017 when Officer Jeff Nelson ordered his police dog to attack and then shot Obet in the torso. Obet fell to the ground and Nelson fired again, fatally shooting Obet in the head. The officer said his life was in danger. The next year, Joseph Allen was crossing in front of Nelson’s patrol car when the officer swerved and pinned him against a fence, breaking both his ankles. His justification: Allen was a dangerous criminal. In 2019, Nelson scuffled with Jesse Sarey after attempting to arrest him for disorderly conduct. He punched Sarey seven times and then shot him in the torso.

“It has to do with respect for the rules, the laws, and others,” he said. “If an officer lacks impulse control or the ability to exercise informed judgment, you can call into question how he investigates cases.”

Kari Sarey, left, the mother of Jesse Sarey — who was killed by Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson in 2019 — stands with Elaine Simons, who briefly fostered Jesse Sarey when he was young, Thursday, June 3, 2021, outside the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent, Wash. Nelson has been charged in the shooting, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't on the King County prosecuting attorney's © Provided by Associated Press Kari Sarey, left, the mother of Jesse Sarey — who was killed by Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson in 2019 — stands with Elaine Simons, who briefly fostered Jesse Sarey when he was young, Thursday, June 3, 2021, outside the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent, Wash. Nelson has been charged in the shooting, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't on the King County prosecuting attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after being charge in Sarey's death. (AP Photo/Martha Bellisle)

The murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer has sparked a national conversation on police reform, ranging from defunding departments to enhancing training. But reform activists and civil rights advocates say prosecutors already have powerful tools at their disposal to curb bad behavior by police – They can use Brady Lists to shine a light on troubled officers and they can then refuse to put forward cases from those officers with tarnished histories.

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In this March 14, 2017, file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg speaks at a news conference in Seattle. Auburn police Officer Jeffrey Nelson has been charged in the 2019 shooting of Jesse Sarey, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't on the prosecutor's © Provided by Associated Press In this March 14, 2017, file photo, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg speaks at a news conference in Seattle. Auburn police Officer Jeffrey Nelson has been charged in the 2019 shooting of Jesse Sarey, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't on the prosecutor's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after being charge in Sarey's death. An Associated Press investigation based on hundreds of documents and interviews with prosecutors, defense attorneys and experts on police reform found that prosecutors do not always used the lists to ensure accountability. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

The AP found that prosecutors sometimes don’t even compile the lists and that wide disparities in what offenses land officers on them are prevalent across the country, with excessive force often failing to merit inclusion.

The AP also found that many prosecutors and police unions have gone to great lengths to keep Brady List information from becoming public.

Now, defense attorneys, public defenders, civil rights groups and even some prosecutors are calling for an increased use of Brady Lists and a broadening of the offenses that will land a police officer on them, while police unions are resisting those efforts.

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Amy Parker of the King County Department of Public Defense called it imperative for officers’ violent histories to be exposed.

“As a career public defender, I have listened to prosecutors routinely make the argument that defendants with prior unlawful uses of force/crimes of violence are more prone to violence and lack credibility,” she said in an email. “If prosecutors are going to apply that standard to defendants, then the same standard should apply to police officers when judging their conduct.”

King County prosecutor Dan Satterberg argues excessive force doesn’t make an officer less credible. “An officer who was accused of using too much force in an unrelated arrest has nothing to do with the impeachment of their veracity,” he said.

Brady Lists stem from a ruling in the 1963 Supreme Court case Brady v. Maryland mandating prosecutors turn over exculpatory evidence to defense attorneys, including information that could be used to question the officers’ credibility. But the ruling did not define the steps prosecutors and police departments must take to ensure defendants are informed or whether lists of troubled officers must be kept at all.

Mohammad Hamoudi, a federal public defender, poses for a photo Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 in Seattle. Auburn Police Officer Jeffrey Nelson has been charged in the shooting death of Jesse Sarey, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't placed on the King County prosecuting attorney's © Provided by Associated Press Mohammad Hamoudi, a federal public defender, poses for a photo Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 in Seattle. Auburn Police Officer Jeffrey Nelson has been charged in the shooting death of Jesse Sarey, and has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, but he wasn't placed on the King County prosecuting attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after being charge in Sarey's death. Hamoudi said given Nelson's history, all his cases should be reviewed. And he hopes his story will encourage prosecutors to track excessive force cases involving other police officers. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The result, critics say, is a mishmash of policies that vary state to state -- and even jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

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Prosecutors in Atlanta, Chicago, Tulsa, and Pittsburgh told the AP that they don’t track officers with disciplinary problems, and Milwaukee prosecutors only listed officers who have been convicted of crimes.

The Dallas County district attorney’s list contained 192 names, with infractions ranging from making false statements to convictions for theft, assault, and driving under the influence. The Suffolk County, Massachusetts, prosecutor’s list included Boston officers who lied on their timesheets or embezzled funds. Louisiana’s Orleans Parish district attorney tracked officers who committed crimes, lied, or drove dangerously, but not violent arrests.

Dishonesty lands an officer on the list in Detroit, Denver, and Seattle, but using excessive force does not.

The Phoenix district attorney, along with prosecutors in Orange County, Florida, and Los Angeles, were among the few the AP found who include excessive use of force cases on their lists.

“It’s like there’s a huge continuum and the result is you don’t have the same procedures being followed not only across the country but within individual states,” said Will Aitchison, an attorney with Portland, Oregon-based Labor Relations Information Systems, which represents officers after they’ve appealed discipline orders.

Some states have attempted to pass legislation that would address the lack of consistency, including the Washington State Legislature, which approved a bill this year requiring county prosecutors to develop written protocols for collecting potential impeachment information by July 2022.

The California Legislature approved a bill last year that required prosecutors to maintain a list of officers who have had “sustained findings for conduct of moral turpitude or group bias,” but Gov. Gavin Newsom vetoed the measure due to the cost of such “a significant state mandate.”

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Email AP’s Global Investigations Team at investigative@ap.org or https://www.ap.org/tips/. See other work at https://www.apnews.com/hub/ap-investigations.

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Follow AP investigative reporter Martha Bellisle at https://twitter.com/marthabellisle

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