•   
  •   
  •   

Crime Nevada Supreme Court Rules Gunmakers Not Liable for Las Vegas Concert Shooting

00:52  04 december  2021
00:52  04 december  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Russian court to rule on shutting down renowned rights group

  Russian court to rule on shutting down renowned rights group MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's Supreme Court is hearing a petition Thursday to shut down one of the country’s oldest and most prominent human rights group, a move that elicited public outrage and is part of a months-long crackdown on activists, independent media and opposition supporters. The Prosecutor General’s Office earlier this month petitioned the Supreme Court to revoke the legal status of Memorial — an international human rights group that rose to prominence for its studies of political repressions in the Soviet Union. The move sparked much public outrage and is part of a months-long crackdown on dissent.

Nevada's highest court has sided with gun manufacturers in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the parents of a woman killed in the 2017 mass shooting on the Las Vegas strip, the Associated Press reported.

The Nevada Supreme Court cited a state law that shields gun manufacturers from liability unless the weapon malfunctions in a new ruling that says they cannot be held responsible for the deaths in the 2017 mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip. Investigators work at a festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas after a mass shooting. © Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo The Nevada Supreme Court cited a state law that shields gun manufacturers from liability unless the weapon malfunctions in a new ruling that says they cannot be held responsible for the deaths in the 2017 mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip. Investigators work at a festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas after a mass shooting.

The state Supreme Court ruled that the gunmakers, including Colt Manufacturing Co. and several others, are not liable for the shooting deaths because a state law protects them from culpability unless one of their firearms malfunctions.

Mississippi asks Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade in blockbuster abortion case

  Mississippi asks Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade in blockbuster abortion case The state's legal argument is the sharpest framing yet of the dispute as Mississippi engages in a frontal assault on the right to abortion.The high court agreed in May to hear a challenge to Mississippi's ban on most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, giving its new, six-member conservative majority a chance to roll back the 1973 ruling that women have a constitutional right to abortion.

The woman's parents filed the lawsuit in July 2019, alleging that the gun companies "knowingly manufactured and sold weapons designed to shoot automatically because they were aware their AR-15s could be easily modified with bump stocks to do so, thereby violating federal and state machine gun prohibitions."

Hundreds of people were wounded and 60 died when Stephen Paddock used an AR-15 with a bump stock to fire at a concert crowd from his hotel room, the AP reported.

This is a breaking story and will be updated.

Related Articles

  • Ohio Student Arrested 3 Days After Mich. Shooting, 'Kill List' of Other Students Reported
  • Parents of Alleged Oxford School Shooter Go Missing After New Charges: Sheriff
  • Man Serving 48 Years for Killing Woman Wants Conviction Tossed After Pandemic Delays Trial
  • Nine White Jurors Picked for Trial of Ex-Cop Charged in Daunte Wright's Death
  • Georgia Principal Receives Email Threat: 'See You and the Dead Students Tomorrow'

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Supreme Court conservatives may have their chance to end affirmative action at universities .
The conservative Supreme Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts has long wanted to diminish racial remedies in American life and may now be headed toward a far-reaching decision on university affirmative action. © Drew Angerer/Getty Images Clouds are seen above The U.S. Supreme Court building on May 17, 2021, in Washington, DC. The court is likely to decide in upcoming weeks whether to hear a challenge to Harvard's admission practices, which critics claim unlawfully consider students' race, benefitting Blacks and Hispanics, but disadvantaging Asian American applicants.

usr: 1
This is interesting!