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Crime Why FBI Assigned Both 'Hate Crime' and 'Terrorism' to Texas Synagogue Attack

05:24  22 january  2022
05:24  22 january  2022 Source:   newsweek.com

Texas Synagogue Hostages Taken by Gunman During Livestream Service

  Texas Synagogue Hostages Taken by Gunman During Livestream Service The man allegedly went on several profanity-laced rants while holding the victims hostage.The hostage situation at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville began during the synagogue's live-streamed Shabbat service, according to Reuters. No injuries have been reported inside the building.

FBI officials have shed more light on the actions of Colleyville synagogue hostage-taker Malik Akram, and disclosed some U.S. criminal codes that could potentially be used against the deceasaed Akram in order to further the investigation . Here, Colleyville police can be seen in front of the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue following the January 15, 2022 standoff. Akram was well known for his antisemitic views, leading to the FBI 's categorization of the hostage crisis as both a hate crime and an act of terrorism . While these two crimes often fall under similar jurisprudence, they are not the same thing.

The FBI director has now called the Texas synagogue hostage situation this past Saturday an “act of terrorism targeting the Jewish community” after downplaying the antisemitic motives. Speaking to the Anti-Defamation League during a webinar on Wednesday, FBI Director Christopher Wray said the agency has been treating the events as an act of terrorism against Jews. “Within a matter of hours, we deployed FBI SWAT, two highly trained units from our elite Hostage Rescue Team; those are the folks who ultimately were the ones who went into the synagogue , along with canines.”

In the aftermath of the hostage standoff at a Colleyville, Texas synagogue on January 15, FBI officials have referred to the incident as both a "hate crime" and an "act of terrorism."

FBI officials have shed more light on the actions of Colleyville synagogue hostage-taker Malik Akram, and disclosed some U.S. criminal codes that could potentially be used against the deceasaed Akram in order to further the investigation. Here, Colleyville police can be seen in front of the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue following the standoff. © Brandon Bell/Getty FBI officials have shed more light on the actions of Colleyville synagogue hostage-taker Malik Akram, and disclosed some U.S. criminal codes that could potentially be used against the deceasaed Akram in order to further the investigation. Here, Colleyville police can be seen in front of the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue following the standoff.

Matthew DeSarno, the Special Agent In Charge of the FBI's Dallas field office, stated during a press conference Friday that the department was still attempting to piece together the true motives of hostage-taker Malik Faisal Akram.

Hostages safe after Texas synagogue standoff; captor dead

  Hostages safe after Texas synagogue standoff; captor dead The man took over services at a Texas synagogue where he could be heard ranting on a livestream.One hostage held Saturday at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville was released during the standoff; three others got out about 9 p.m. when an FBI SWAT team entered the building, authorities said. The hostage taker was killed and FBI Special Agent in Charge Matt DeSarno said a team would investigate “the shooting incident.

FBI Director calls texas hostage situation ‘Act of terrorism targeting the jewish community’. "The only thing more frightening than a violent act of antisemitism, is a violent act of antisemitism that the world is happy to ignore," Barlow wrote before describing how British Barlow noted that the Associated Press wrote, "Hostages apparently taken at Texas synagogue ," a headline questioning whether hostages were actually taken, while The New York Times didn't even have the story on its front page the following day. "It didn't receive nearly as much coverage on rolling

The investigation is revealing facts at odds with the FBI ’s statement shortly after the hostages were free that disclaimed any association from the attack with anti-Semitism. The FBI was most certainly aware of the conversation the terrorist had with his brother, who was cooperating with law enforcement from a situation room in the UK, according to the Daily Mail. EcoHealth Alliance Alleged ‘CIA Front Organization’ Tied to Wuhan Lab Leak. FBI ’s Narrative About Texas Synagogue Terrorist Unravels.

The FBI previously referred to the situation as "a terrorism-related matter" that targeted the Jewish community. However, DeSarno added that they were also treating Akram's actions as a hate crime.

Akram, 44, took four people hostage at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville while demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani associate of al-Qaeda serving an 86-year prison sentence in Texas for attempted murder. Akram, a British national, held at least three of the hostages within the synagogue for 11 hours before being killed by an FBI team that breached the building.

Officials confirmed Akram's cause of death Friday as multiple gunshot wounds.

Akram had entered the United States on a tourist visa approximately two weeks before the standoff. Investigators believe that he had chosen to attack this particular synagogue because it was closest to the prison where Siddiqui is held.

Support flows to 'changed' Texas synagogue after standoff

  Support flows to 'changed' Texas synagogue after standoff DALLAS (AP) — The tight-knit congregation at a Texas synagogue where four people were held hostage by an armed captor during a 10-hour standoff over the weekend traces its roots back to a gathering organized over 20 years ago by a handful of families who were new to the area. “It was a Jewish holiday and we were just feeling kind of isolated and unsure who else was living here that was Jewish,” Anna Salton Eisen, a founder and former president of Congregation Beth Israel, said Sunday.

The FBI ’s statement that they “are continuing to work to find the motive” is another example of the agency’s ineptitude on multiple levels. The first is simply their refusal to even hint at the crime ’s motivation as antisemitism, which is the only accurate label for an attack at a synagogue on Shabbat where a rabbi and three congregants are held hostage. “If the law enforcement community doesn’t understand what’s going on, they’re not going to be able to address the fallout from this,” said Kenneth Marcus, the founder and chairman of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law.

Federal Bureau of Investigations Director Christopher Wray called Saturday's hostage situation at a Colleyville, Texas synagogue an "act of terrorism targeting the Jewish community." Wray made the comments during an address given to the Anti-Defamation League during a webinar on Wednesday. "Now let me be clear and blunt, the FBI is, and has been, treating Saturday’s events as an act of terrorism targeting the Jewish community. Within a matter of hours, we deployed FBI SWAT, two highly trained units from our elite Hostage Rescue Team; those are the folks who ultimately were the ones

Akram was well known for his antisemitic views, leading to the FBI's categorization of the hostage crisis as both a hate crime and an act of terrorism. While these two crimes often fall under similar jurisprudence, they are not the same thing.

Domestic terrorism is defined by the FBI as "violent, criminal acts committed by individuals and/or groups to further ideological goals stemming from domestic influences, such as those of a political, religious, social, racial, or environmental nature."

Domestic terrorism charges are often brought in relation to so-called "lone wolf" terrorists. One notable example is Ted Kaczynski, better known as the Unabomber, who is currently serving a life sentence for using homemade bombs in relation to a series of murders.

The FBI defines a hate crime in a broader manner—a crime "motivated in whole or in part by an offender's bias against a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or gender identity."

British Police Arrest Two Teens Over Texas Synagogue Standoff

  British Police Arrest Two Teens Over Texas Synagogue Standoff Police said the teenagers were being questioned after an incident at a synagogue in Colleyville ended with an armed British national dead.The FBI on Sunday identified the armed man who took a rabbi and three others hostage for about 11 hours at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville as 44-year-old Malik Faisal Akram.

FBI Director Christopher Wray on Thursday spoke during a webinar hosted by the Anti-Defamation League during which he said they are treating Saturday's hostage situation at a Texas synagogue as a terrorist act. 20 (UPI) -- The FBI is treating Saturday's hostage situation at a Texas synagogue as an act of terrorism that targeted the Jewish community, Christopher Wray, the department's director, said Thursday. "This was not some random occurrence.

Texas synagogue hostage aftermath: UK teens released without charges as radicalization concerns grow. The U.K. terrorism police said they are continuing to "support U.S. authorities with their investigation into the events in Texas ," and will further "liaise with Though Akram died at the scene, the FBI has extended investigations to London and Tel Aviv to determine if the suspected gunman acted alone or as part of a larger terror cell. He was heard on the synagogue ’s Facebook livestream demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani national imprisoned in Fort

While hate itself is not a crime, the FBI is clear to note that any hate used in the perpetration of a crime is a violation of the law.

An FBI official speaking to Newsweek referenced U.S. criminal codes 18 U.S. 247 and 18 U.S. 2331 as being applicable to Akram's actions.

18 U.S. 247 is in relation to damaging religious property. It also codifies penalties for threatening a person's right to freedom of religion.

18 U.S. 2331 codifies international terrorism, outlining acts of terrorism that would be a crime if committed in any American jurisdiction. Given that Akram's crime was committed on U.S. soil, this code serves more to help define his hostage-taking as an act of terrorism.

Despite the perpetrator being deceased, the investigation into the attack remains ongoing. Much of the FBI's continuing work will be to help piece together how a dangerous person such as Akram could have slipped under the radar.

Multiple reports from British outlets, including The Guardian and the BBC, stated that the U.K. had considered Akram a "possible terrorist threat." However, the White House said that Akram had not raised any alarms when going through American customs, and as such was not viewed as a threat.

Related Articles

  • 2 Teens Arrested in Connection to Synagogue Standoff Reportedly Malik Faisal Akram's Sons
  • Malik Faisal Akram, Texas Synagogue Hostage-Taker, Was Believed to Pose No Threat
  • Woman at Center of Texas Synagogue Attack Vowed to 'Kill as Many F--- Americans as I Can'

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Synagogues face a security reckoning in the wake of the deadly Texas standoff .
In the wake of a deadly standoff at a Texas synagogue, the Torah’s requirement that Jews must open their doors to those in need has run headlong into the need to protect a sacred space from dangerous intruders. And at synagogues across the country, rabbis and other leaders told NBC News they have been wrestling with that ethical dilemma.“There’s no easy answer,” said Benny Rogosnitzky, who is the cantor at the Park East Synagogue in New York City and deeply involved in conversations about securing the historic site. “At the end of the day, we’re a house of God, and in a house of God everyone can worship.

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This is interesting!