•   
  •   
  •   

Crime Staff Accused of Using Shoelace to Mask Disabled Student Found of No Criminal Wrongdoing

03:06  25 january  2022
03:06  25 january  2022 Source:   newsweek.com

Kansas City mayor: COVID-19 challenges include misinformation, political right

  Kansas City mayor: COVID-19 challenges include misinformation, political right Kansas City, Missouri Mayor Quinton Lucas (D) on Sunday said he is facing two challenges as his municipality battles COVID-19: misinformation regarding vaccinations and opposition from the political right when it comes to mask mandates and other mitigation practices.Asked by moderator Margaret Brennan on CBS's "Face the Nation" what is holding him back from enacting a citywide mask mandate to tame the spread of COVID-19, Lucas pointed to the "Asked by moderator Margaret Brennan on CBS's "Face the Nation" what is holding him back from enacting a citywide mask mandate to tame the spread of COVID-19, Lucas pointed to the "political challenge" he has received from the state of Missouri.

A Florida school district and members of its staff will not have charges brought against them after a shoelace was used to tie a face mask onto a disabled student, according to a Florida state attorney.

Demonstrators participate in a Defeat the Mandates march in Washington, DC, on January 23, 2022. There was no criminal wrongdoing found after a school lace was used to tie a mask around a disabled child. (Photo by STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images) STEFANI REYNOLDS/Getty Images © STEFANI REYNOLDS/Getty Images Demonstrators participate in a Defeat the Mandates march in Washington, DC, on January 23, 2022. There was no criminal wrongdoing found after a school lace was used to tie a mask around a disabled child. (Photo by STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images) STEFANI REYNOLDS/Getty Images

According to an Orlando television station, the announcement stated that "no criminal wrongdoing" was found in the case. Monday's announcement comes after the parents, Shirley and Jeffrey Steel, demanded an investigation into an elementary school and members of its staff after learning that their 7-year-old child with Down syndrome had a mask tied to her head without her consent.

Cost of masks and tests deepens a pandemic wedge between the haves and the have-nots

  Cost of masks and tests deepens a pandemic wedge between the haves and the have-nots Watch Dallas Cowboys wide receiver CeeDee Lamb's top plays during the NFL 2021 season.

Prior to the incident, school faculty sent a note home with all students detailing the district's mask policy.

In an October interview, after learning of the incident with his daughter, Jeffrey told an Orlando television station that a mask could have been dangerous for her well-being.

"Medically, she could aspirate, she could asphyxiate, all sorts of medical things that could happen and because of her breathing, because of her enlarged tongue could cause seizures."

Jeffrey went on to say that he thought his daughter would be exempt from the school's mandate.

The school released a statement that "the student was given a mask exemption as soon as the parents made the request to school leadership. The school district is investigating the allegations made by the family."

Worse Than Theranos

  Worse Than Theranos As the Elizabeth Holmes trial concluded, another medical tech scandal was also finishing, and the difference says a lot about what we really value.Thomas Whitten, a 71-year-old former doctor, was sentenced to nearly five years in prison for his role in overprescribing a fentanyl spray known as Subsys that is administered under the tongue. It led one patient to believe he “was going crazy” from hallucinations and caused “literally three or four” of his teeth to fall out while at work one day.

Soon after, the school changed its mask mandate, saying that parents could ask that their child be exempt from wearing masks.

However, it was in early October that Jeffrey contacted police and told authorities of the incident at the elementary school.

Officers began their investigation and reached out to the school. Those questioned admitted that they did, in fact, use a shoelace to tie a mask on the child. However, they also said that at no time was it too tight or that they ever saw any signs from the child that would have indicated pain or suffering. Staff members told police that the child knew sign language in order to ask for assistance from staff members, did so often and was able to do so even while wearing the mask.

The staff members questioned by police also said they used an example from the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation in order to properly tie the shoelace around the child.

'I will bring every single gun loaded,' parent tells Virginia school officials during mask mandate meeting

  'I will bring every single gun loaded,' parent tells Virginia school officials during mask mandate meeting A Virginia woman was arrested Friday after she appeared to threaten school board officials while they met to vote on whether to lift a mask requirement. © Provided by NBC News The woman, Amelia King, 42, was accused of making an oral threat on school property after she was cut off during a public comment section of the Page County public school board meeting Thursday, the Luray Police Department said in a statement. “Alright. No mask mandates,” King told board members after her three minute comment period ended. “My children will not come to school on Monday with a mask on.

In their findings, police stated there was no criminal wrongdoing or any reason to bring charges against those in question. Police then passed their findings along to Phil Archer, state attorney for the 18th Judicial Circuit, representing Brevard and Seminole counties.

Archer concurred with the officers' findings, saying in a statement that "after a careful review of the investigative reports, interviews, and evidence provided to our office, we agree with the conclusion reached by the Indian Harbor Beach Police that no criminal acts were committed."

He went on to state that the case is "a textbook example of what rushing to judgment prior to the conclusion of an investigation can produce in today's hypersensitive, politically charged climate."

Newsweek reached out to Archer's office for further comment but did not hear back before publication.

Related Articles

  • Parents Are Opting for Charter, Home School as COVID Pushes Kids Out of Public Classrooms
  • Substitute Teacher Allegedly Groped Himself in Front of Students on First Day at School
  • Oxford High School Students Return After Some Renovations Following Fatal Shooting
  • COVID Evaluation Model Estimates 57 Percent of World Population Infected at Least Once
  • U.K. Removes COVID Testing for Vaccinated Travelers as Rule 'Outlived its Usefulness'

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

US Rep. Cuellar: 'No wrongdoing on my part' after FBI search .
LAREDO, Texas (AP) — U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar posted a video Tuesday saying he took part in ‘no wrongdoing’ after FBI agents last week searched near the Texas congressman's home. Cuellar hasn’t been charged with a crime and the bureau has said nothing about the scope of its investigation since agents were photographed near his home in Laredo on Jan. 19. The nine-term congressman said in the video posted by his campaign that he was fully cooperating with law enforcement but provided no details.

usr: 1
This is interesting!