•   
  •   
  •   

Crime Lizelle Herera Abortion-Murder Charge 'Tip of the Iceberg,' Warns Nonprofit

00:51  11 april  2022
00:51  11 april  2022 Source:   newsweek.com

The four states planning to become 'abortion sanctuaries' as others pass bans

  The four states planning to become 'abortion sanctuaries' as others pass bans Democratic strongholds are positioning themselves as safe havens for women seeking abortions who live in states with new restrictions on the procedures. State efforts to safeguard access to abortion for residents and visitors are preemptive responses to a possible Supreme Court decision to unravel the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that established the legal right to an abortion before the age of viability. The court is slated to rule in June on the most consequential abortion rights case in decades, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health.

The Texas woman charged with murder for a "self-induced" abortion has been released from prison, but one nonprofit warns that her story is only the beginning.

Lizelle Herrera, the Texas woman charged with murder over allegedly having a self-induced abortion, was released from jail on Saturday following intense backlash. Above, a shot of protests against Texas's draconian abortion laws in 2021. © Montinique Monroe/Getty Images Lizelle Herrera, the Texas woman charged with murder over allegedly having a self-induced abortion, was released from jail on Saturday following intense backlash. Above, a shot of protests against Texas's draconian abortion laws in 2021.

Lizelle Herrera, 26, was arrested in Starr County, Texas, on Thursday for what authorities described as a "self-induced abortion," for which she was charged with murder. In September, the Texas state government passed a bill, officially known as Senate Bill 8, banning any abortion starting at six weeks into a pregnancy, when many women don't realize they're pregnant. The measure has been widely criticized as "draconian."

Oklahoma's abortion law would be the most 'cruel' yet for women, health care groups say

  Oklahoma's abortion law would be the most 'cruel' yet for women, health care groups say Oklahoma's abortion ban, which health care leaders say would be among the most "devastating" yet, could trigger a ripple effect, especially in Texas.That option could soon disappear after the Oklahoma Legislature's passage of a near-total abortion ban, among the most restrictive in the nation. The bill advanced Tuesday needs only the signature of Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt, who has said he would sign all abortion restrictions, to become law.

On Saturday, Herrera was released from the Starr County Jail after significant international backlash to her arrest and protests outside the jailhouse. The following day, District Attorney Gocha Allen Ramirez announced that his office would be filing a motion to dismiss the indictment against Herrera on Monday.

In his statement, Ramirez said that Herrera's case ultimately did not meet the standard for criminal charges, but he also stood by the actions of local law enforcement.

"In reviewing applicable Texas law, it is clear that Ms. Herrera cannot and should not be prosecuted for the allegation against her," the statement read. "In reviewing this case, it is clear that the Starr County Sheriff's Department did their duty in investigating the incident brought to their attention by the reporting hospital. To ignore the incident would have been a dereliction of their duty."

Texas Woman Charged With Murder for 'Self-Induced' Abortion

  Texas Woman Charged With Murder for 'Self-Induced' Abortion Lizelle Herrera. 26, was arrested in Starr County and charged with murder for allegedly performing what police called a "self-induced abortion."Lizelle Herrera, 26, was arrested on Thursday in Starr County, near the Mexican border and charged with murder for allegedly performing what police called a "self-induced abortion," Texas Public Radio (TPR) reported.

Few details about what happened to Herrera are known at this time. Rockie Gonzalez, founder of the La Frontera Fund, an abortion assistance fund, told Texas Public Radio that she had allegedly been in the hospital and suffered a miscarriage.

After she divulged certain information to staff, the hospital reported her to the local police for potentially violating the state's abortion laws. Legal analyst Glenn Kirschner opined on Twitter about whether the fact that she was reported to police had anything to do with another facet of Senate Bill 8, which deputizes residents to report suspected instances of unlawful abortions.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women told The Independent that Herrera's story showed the "true intent" of lawmakers fighting for strict abortion laws and will only be the start of such cases.

"It is a tragedy, and just the tip of the iceberg," the group said. "No case in Texas has ever permitted the use of the state's murder law to address abortion or pregnancy loss. This is unconstitutional."

Woman charged with murder for self-induced abortion

  Woman charged with murder for self-induced abortion An increased squeeze on abortion laws is bringing about a new wave of historical charges related to women's rights People participate in a rally organized by RiseUp4AbortionRights, which held rallies and marches nationwide to oppose the growing erosion of abortion rights on International Women's Day. Wendy P.

Newsweek reached out to DA Ramirez's office for comment.

Related Articles

  • Tshibaka Says Make Mailing Abortion Pills Federal Crime in Resurfaced Video
  • Texas Woman Charged With Murder for 'Self-Induced' Abortion
  • Death Penalty for Abortions Becomes Pivotal Issue in GOP Runoff in Texas

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Kentucky legislature overrides Beshear's veto of abortion bill .
Kentucky's GOP-controlled legislature on Wednesday overrode Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear's veto of a broad abortion bill that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, restricts access to medication abortion and makes it more difficult for a minor to obtain an abortion in the state. © Bruce Schreiner/AP Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort. The bill was filed with the secretary of state's office on Thursday, and because of the emergency clause, it goes into effect immediately.

usr: 1
This is interesting!