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Entertainment 5 books not to miss: Jami Attenberg's 'All This Could Be Yours,' John le Carré spy novel

22:35  21 october  2019
22:35  21 october  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

15 New Books You Should Read in October

  15 New Books You Should Read in October The sequel to 'Olive Kitteridge,' new Zadie Smith and moreThe latest work of autofiction from Ben Lerner centers around a high school debate star and his psychologist parents, who are navigating how to raise a son in a culture of increasing toxic masculinity. Most of the action occurs in the late ’90s, when the New Right is beginning to take shape. Lerner, a Topeka native, explores masculinity in this family drama, which picks apart the consequences of violence and tragedy on the protagonist’s adolescence.

In search of something good to read? USA TODAY's Barbara VanDenburgh scopes out the shelves for this week’s hottest new book releases.

a red awning with white text: © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt "All This Could Be Yours," by Jami Attenberg.

1. “All This Could Be Yours,” by Jami Attenberg (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, fiction, on sale Oct. 22)

What it’s about: Dubbed the “poet laureate of difficult families” by Kirkus Reviews, Attenberg (“All Grown Up,” “The Middlesteins”) weaves a brutal and beautiful story of familial dysfunction. A dying and toxic patriarch brings the family together around his deathbed, where they must sift through the wreckage and dark family secrets.

Leigh Bardugo makes adult debut in dark fantasy 'Ninth House'

  Leigh Bardugo makes adult debut in dark fantasy 'Ninth House' "Shadow and Bone" author Leigh Bardugo makes the leap from YA in her first adult novel, "Ninth House," a dark fantasy that explores class and magic.

The buzz: A ★★★★ review (out of four) for USA TODAY says Attenberg “doesn’t flinch from digging into life’s messiness, pressing gently but resolutely into wounds to see what oozes out.”

2. "Agent Running in the Field," by John le Carré (Viking, fiction, on sale Oct. 22)

What it’s about: The master of espionage novels (“The Spy Who Came in from the Cold,” “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”) returns with an aging veteran of MI6 being called back to London in a spy thriller that grapples with modern political issues.

The buzz: In a ★★★½ review for USA TODAY, book critic Don Oldenburg says, “le Carré’s storytelling genius frequently causes pause to consider what a pleasure it is to read him.”

3. “One Day: The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary 24 Hours in America,” by Gene Weingarten (Blue Rider Press, nonfiction, on sale Oct. 22)

Ali Wong's book 'Dear Girls' is raw and uproariously funny

  Ali Wong's book 'Dear Girls' is raw and uproariously funny Fans of Ali Wong will not be disappointed with the comedian's first book, a collection of sometimes scandalous essays called "Dear Girls".

What it’s about: This book has a fascinating conceit: Pulitzer Prize-winner Weingarten asked three strangers to pick a day, month and year from a hat. That randomly chosen day turned out to be Dec. 28, 1986. The research that ensued proved there’s no such thing as an ordinary day.

The buzz: Publishers Weekly calls the book “a trove of compelling human-interest pieces with long reverberations.”

4. “Edison,” by Edmund Morris (Random House, nonfiction on sale Oct. 22)

What it’s about: British biographer (and Pulitzer- and National Book Award-winner) Morris died earlier this year, but not before completing this massive and exhaustively researched biography of Thomas Alva Edison, the larger-than-life American icon who patented over 1,000 inventions and founded nearly 250 companies.

The buzz: A starred review in Kirkus Reviews calls the biography “a tour de force by a master.”

New books: Ronan Farrow's ‘Catch and Kill,’ Elton John, Ali Wong

  New books: Ronan Farrow's ‘Catch and Kill,’ Elton John, Ali Wong Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Ronan Farrow is out for justice in "Catch and Kill," and Elton John bares all in a memoir simply titled "Me."1. “Catch and Kill,” by Ronan Farrow (Little, Brown and Company, nonfiction, on sale Oct.

5. “Janis: Her Life and Music,” by Holly George-Warren (Simon and Schuster, nonfiction on sale Oct. 22)

What it’s about: Drawing on archival materials and interviews with Janis Joplin’s friends and family, George-Warren intimately charts the singer’s life from her childhood in Port Arthur, Texas, to her tragic death by drug overdose in 1970, painting a portrait of a complicated and still endlessly fascinating trailblazer.

The buzz: A starred review in Kirkus Reviews calls it a “richly detailed, affectionate portrait” and “a top-notch biography of one of the greatest performers to emerge from a brilliant era.”

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 5 books not to miss: Jami Attenberg's 'All This Could Be Yours,' John le Carré spy novel

'In the Dream House': Carmen Maria Machado powerfully explores trauma of abuse .
Carmen Maria Machado follows her brilliant 2017 story collection "Her Body and Other Parties" with a powerful examination of an abusive relationship.She seems to be just as comfortable applying that strategy to nonfiction as well. In her piercing follow-up memoir, “In the Dream House” (Graywolf, 264 pp., ★★★½ out of four stars), she explores the trauma of a psychologically abusive relationship, as she falls for a woman whose behavior becomes increasingly nightmarish. The unnamed woman is a fellow creative-writing grad student, attractive and addictingly carefree.

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