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Entertainment Michael Jackson († 50): Daughter Paris: "I went through hell"

13:25  05 july  2020
13:25  05 july  2020 Source:   bunte.de

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Paris Jackson © Getty Images / Theo Wargo Paris Jackson

The unexpected death of Michael Jackson († 50) shook millions of fans in June 2009 World. Whatever serious reproaches he will later make , the "King of Pop" has become immortal for his followers through his music. Among the mourners who are most severely affected by the loss are his three children, Prince (23), Paris (22) and Blanket (18). In the Facebook series "Unfiltered: Paris Jackson & Gabriel Glenn", the Jackson daughter now remembers the difficult time eleven years after his death - and she looks ahead.

Silent, depressed: In the video below you can learn more about the sad life of his children.

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Paris Jackson processes her pain into music

Paris Jackson says: "I went through hell , his death and many other things that I went through in my life. When I don't talk about it or in my music process, something in my life would go completely wrong. It would own me. I would become a slave to my pain. "

Paris emphasizes: "I am a Jackson! It is only logical that I am a musician." Everyone in her family was connected to music, would make music. It had always been her dream to follow in her father's footsteps.

daughter of Michael Jackson starts with "The Sunflowers"

The 22-year-old is on the best way to live this dream. A few weeks ago, Paris and her friend Gabriel Glenn appeared as "The Sunflowers" in clubs in Los Angeles, among others. Her music has a certain melancholy, you listen to it carefully. It is folk that goes to the heart.

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