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Entertainment Zoo Separates 5 Parrots After the Birds Were Caught Encouraging Each Other to Swear At Guests

22:25  30 september  2020
22:25  30 september  2020 Source:   people.com

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These zoo parrots' potty mouths got them relocated.

a bird sitting on a branch: Lincolnshire Wildlife Park © Provided by People Lincolnshire Wildlife Park

At the British zoo Lincolnshire Wildlife Centre, keeping some of the bird residents' vocabulary limited to G-rated language has proven challenging — and park employees had to go as far as separating five African grey parrots to squash the swearing.

According to the Associated Press, Billy, Eric, Tyson, Jade, and Elsie — who all were welcomed to the park in August — were removed from each other's presences since they were encouraging each other to curse and rally in expletive-filled rants together.

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"We are quite used to parrots swearing, but we’ve never had five at the same time," Steve Nichols, the zoo’s chief executive, told the outlet. "Most parrots clam up outside, but for some reason these five relish it."

Though most visitors who overheard the colorful language laughed it off — "When a parrot tells you to 'f--- off' it amuses people very highly; it’s brought a big smile to a really hard year," said Nichols — the zoo decided to take measures to nip the behavior in the bud.

a bird sitting on a branch: © Lincolnshire Wildlife Park "Some visitors found it funny but with kids visiting at weekends, we decided to move them," a Lincolnshire Wildlife Centre staffer said

The five parrots were spread out to different areas in the zoo so that they don't, according to Nichols, "set each other off."

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A post shared by Lincolnshire wildlife park (@lincswildlifepark) on Sep 29, 2020 at 11:35am PDT

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Nichols told BBC News that the foul-mouthed birds would "swear to trigger a reaction or a response," so when park visitors burst into laughter or other birds reacted at their interjections, they'd hurl more bad words.

"With the five, one would swear and another would laugh and that would carry on," he said. "... Some visitors found it funny but with kids visiting at weekends, we decided to move them."

Added Nichols: "I'm hoping they learn different words within colonies — but if they teach the others bad language and I end up with 250 swearing birds, I don't know what we'll do."

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Aside from these five naughty birds, Lincolnshire Wildlife Park is also home to Chico, a 9-year-old yellow-crowned Amazon parrot who recently went viral for his hilarious — and perfect — rendition of Beyoncé's 2008 hit song "If I Were a Boy."

In the video, shared on the park's Facebook and Instagram pages, Chico sits in his cage while busting out the pitch-perfect vocals to the song's opening lines. Visitors at the park, meanwhile, could be heard laughing in the background, admiring Chico's performance.

"Chico sings #Beyoncé classic #lincswildlife," the park wrote on Instagram alongside footage of Chico singing.

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