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Entertainment Politician ordered to pay $1.2 million after losing Twisted Sister copyright case

21:00  30 april  2021
21:00  30 april  2021 Source:   ew.com

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Australian politician Clive Palmer is out approximately $1.17 million ($1.5 million AU) after losing a copyright case over the Twisted Sister song "We're Not Gonna Take It."

Clive Palmer wearing a suit and tie: Cole Bennetts/Getty Images; John Lamparski/Getty Images © Provided by Entertainment Weekly Cole Bennetts/Getty Images; John Lamparski/Getty Images

The allegations against Palmer, filed by Universal Music in February of last year, came from his 2019 political advertisements, where he used the melody of the song to promote the United Australian Party. He even had a featured vocalist singing the classic melody, where he switched out some of the words to substitute for a parody that fit the campaign.

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The original lyrics, sung by Twisted Sister singer Dee Snider, are "oh we're not gonna take it, no we ain't gonna take it, oh we're not gonna take it anymore." Palmer's arrangement used the words "Australia ain't gonna cop it, no Australia's not gonna cop it, Aussies not gonna cop it anymore."

According to a report from ABC News in Australia, Palmer tried to plead his case in the trial by accusing Snider of cribbing from the famous Christmas Carol "O Come, All Ye Faithful" for his own song. He also insisted that the lyrics weren't inspired by the famous song, but instead from the 1976 film Network. Ultimately, Palmer was overruled and found guilty of copyright infringement, and ordered to pay the $150,000 copyright fee as well as remove all copies and videos of the song from the Internet.

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Clive Palmer wearing a suit and tie: Dee Snider wasn't going to take it anymore from Australian politician Clive Palmer. © Cole Bennetts/Getty Images; John Lamparski/Getty Images Dee Snider wasn't going to take it anymore from Australian politician Clive Palmer.

As for Snider, he cheered his win on Twitter, writing "HALLELUJAH!! Just found out that the copyright infringement of 'We're Not Gonna Take It' by 'politician' Clive Palmer in Australia has been decided MAJORLY in favor of myself as writer and @UMG as publishers! WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT ANY MORE!!"

Snider continued to share victories from the lawsuit, replying to friends and fans and adding "it's over baby! WE WON BIG!!"

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