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Entertainment Anya Taylor-Joy on ‘Last Night in Soho’ and Edgar Wright’s Superpower

01:30  28 october  2021
01:30  28 october  2021 Source:   hollywoodreporter.com

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Wright initially thought Taylor - Joy should play Eloise, but that part eventually went to “Jojo Rabbit” star Thomasin McKenzie. Taylor - Joy plays Sandee, an aspiring 1960 s singer in London who Eloise sees in her dreams. Thomasin McKenzie and Edgar Wright at the Los Angeles premiere of ‘ Last Night in Soho ’ at Sadly, she was unable to go on promotional tours for her released drama, Jane Campion’ s “ Power of the Dog.” “I had to miss out on a lot of things because I was unable to attend a lot of the festivals so that’ s why I am so excited to finally be here and reunited with everybody,” McKenzie said.

Anya Taylor - Joy stars in Edgar Wright ’ s new “ Last Night in Soho ,” but it wasn’t the first time they could have worked together. Wright first approached Taylor - Joy about “ Last Night in Soho ” roughly six years ago, shortly after seeing her breakout performance in Robert Eggers’ Sundance hit “The Witch.”

Before she played The Queen Gambit‘s Beth Harmon in 1960s Kentucky, Last Night in Sohostar Anya Taylor-Joy portrayed Sandie in Edgar Wright’s take on 1960s London. Wright’s psychological horror film revolves around Thomasin McKenzie’s Ellie in the present day, as she begins having vivid dreams involving a talented 1960s singer played by Taylor-Joy. The latter not only shows off her dancing prowess in the film, but she also turns heads with an a cappella performance of Petula Clark’s “Downtown.” Taylor-Joy credits Wright for directing “in beats,” as well as his vast music knowledge and predetermined needle drops.

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Wright first approached Taylor - Joy about “ Last Night in Soho ” roughly six years ago, shortly after seeing her breakout performance in Robert Eggers’ Sundance hit “The Witch.” “He was a judge at Sundance and I was really starstruck,” Taylor - Joy said. “I was like, ‘Oh, my god, Edgar Wright wants to talk to me!’ … Taylor - Joy plays Sandee, an aspiring 1960 s singer in London who Eloise sees in her dreams. “Over the years, I started to sound like the boy who cried wolf whenever I’d run into Anya ,” Wright said, laughing. “And when I started writing it and I’d seen a lot of her other movies, I started to

British film-maker Edgar Wright said he drew inspiration from the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Italian horror director Dario Argento to depict the dark side of London in his psychological thriller " Last Night in Soho ". But her dream fast turns into a neon-drenched nightmare as she finds herself transported back to the decade and inhabiting the life of Sandie, an aspiring singer played by "The Queen' s Gambit" star Anya Taylor - Joy . Wright , who started working on the idea more than a decade ago, called the film a "dark valentine to Soho ", the central London area where most of the action takes place.

“I love that he knows what the music is going to be before he does the scene. As a performer, it places you in the realm, perfectly,” Taylor-Joy tells The Hollywood Reporter. “I’ve definitely had moments where I’ve watched a movie back and thought, ‘Oh, if I had known it was going to sound like this, I would’ve calibrated that a little bit differently.’ So having the music beforehand might be something that I carry on [to my own set, someday].”

Last year, Taylor-Joy was cast in George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road prequel, Furiosa, as the eponymous lead character, and even though they’re still in the early stages, she’s already impressed by Miller’s unique sensibility.

“Even at this stage in the process, working with him is like going to university,” Taylor-Joy shares. “I love the conversations that we have. I love the way that we talk not just about the character but the story as a whole. I adore him already, and I haven’t even met the man in person yet.”

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Stephen King Tweets Praise for Edgar Wright ' s ' Last Night in Soho ' – The Hollywood Reporter. 3 hours ago. Excellent soundtrack. Anya Taylor - Joy and Thomasin McKenzie kill it. Matt Smith haunts the screen. Everybody brings it. Check it out. www.ksdk.com/article/entertainment/movies/movie-reviews/ edgar - wrights - last - night - in - soho -cinema-intoxication-finest-review/63-d7484b48-4207-422f-a45e-3b3ed0c502c8.

filmmaker’ s psychological thriller Last Night in Soho . In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Taylor - Joy reveals how she felt about getting up onstage in front of the cast and crew to belt out a few songs, even though she’d been cast before Wright knew she had the pipes to back up the performance. “The first time he properly heard me sing was when we were doing the scene, and he was so gracious because he understands how I feel about characters. I just thought from an audience point of view hearing somebody bear their soul a cappella in a slower way, it adds vulnerability that makes

In a recent conversation with THR, Taylor-Joy also reflects on mirroring McKenzie, as well as an elaborate dance sequence the two shared with co-star Matt Smith.

Your list of illustrious collaborators keeps getting longer. With that frame of reference in mind, what is Edgar’s superpower among that group?

Wow, the amount of references he has both in music and in film. But also, he directs in beats, and as an actor who started off as a dancer, I see my scenes in beats. And being able to collaborate with somebody who spoke the same language as I did in that way was wonderful. Truly.

For the many reflection shots involving you and Thomasin [McKenzie], did the two of you basically learn choreography to mirror each other in that way?

Yes, we had a wonderful choreographer called Jennifer White, but she kind of let us lead it. It was almost about becoming each other, and what’s beautiful about that is both Thomasin and I like to be quiet, very quiet sometimes. And that’s the meditation that you have to get into in order to be able to anticipate someone’s movements before your own and having that very still and yet, buzzing-with-energy connection between the two of us. That was something that I hadn’t experienced before, and it was so much fun to do.

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Anya Taylor - Joy , playing the aspiring singer, Sandy, (who Thomasin McKenzie’ s Eloise is having some deep visions about), takes the stage at an empty nightclub for an audition and belts Petula Clark’ s “Downtown.” It’ s truly a moving, spiritual sequence, and an oasis in the first act after Wright has colorfully set up his movie about a young And it’ s a scene that had the audience transfixed last night at the pic’ s TIFF premiere. Speaking to Last Night in Soho director, producer and writer Wright today at Deadline’ s Toronto studio, we asked the iconoclast if he, too, was concerned about the future of

Последние твиты от Last Night in Soho (@lastnightinsoho). Directed by @EdgarWright. Starring @AnyaTaylorJoy, Thomasin McKenzie and Matt Smith. Kudos to my pal @edgarwright for his memorable " Last Night in Soho ," which is one the most imaginative and excitingly conceived pictures of the decade for those of us who love cinema. I recommend you see it theatrically if possible because it' s a REAL MOVIE.

The opening dance number was also incredible as you and Thomasin kept switching in and out. Was that quite the process to put together?

Yes and no. We were genuinely like little kids after every single take. We would rush to the monitor and say, “Oh my gosh! We pulled it off. This is incredible!” The behind the scenes of that is almost better than what’s in the movie because it’s quite funny seeing how we managed to be where we had to be for the perfect moment. And it’s not only a dance between Thomasin, Matt and myself; it’s also really a dance with the camera. At one point, our director of photography [Chung-hoon Chung] jumped in with some lights and that’s when it was pretty wild. Having four people move that quickly around each other was pretty extraordinary.

We’ve talked before about your filmmaking aspirations and how you treat each set like film school. Did you pick up anything in particular from Edgar’s set that you might apply to your own set someday?

I love that he knows what the music is going to be before he does the scene. As a performer, it places you in the realm, perfectly. You can really understand what it is. I’ve definitely had moments where I’ve watched a movie back and thought, “Oh, if I had known it was going to sound like this, if this was the sonic information I was going to get, I would’ve calibrated that a little bit differently.” So having the music beforehand might be something that I carry on.

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Even though Sandie is introduced as a projection in Thomasin’s character’s dreams, did you still approach this character like you would any other character of yours?

Yeah, Sandie was a very real person for me. I had to play her that way. I get so invested in my characters that I really have to know them. Each character comes through in such a different way, and there’s really no telling how that point of connection I’ll have with them is going to happen. For Sandie, I could feel that desperation. As somebody who didn’t know anybody in the entertainment industry, I understood this longing to be part of this world and needing somebody to give you a break. It’s not enough to have the talent; you need so much luck and so many specific doors to open for you. So I felt that I could give her that kind of hunger. Unfortunately, her story goes quite differently than mine does and I’m very grateful that I have a kinder story.

I believe you went straight from playing Sandie in ’60s London to playing Beth Harmon in ’60s Kentucky. So did anything from your experience on Soho come in handy on The Queen’s Gambit?

Ooh, interesting. If I’m being perfectly honest, I started off January 2019 semi-terrified as to how I was going to film three feature-length projects with one day off in between all of them. So I just remember when I wrapped Soho, I thought, “I now only have to take care of one character,” because I’d been living with three for such a long time. It’s pretty wild to go from being an Austen heroine [in Emma.] — where to touch someone’s hand through gloves meant so much — to suddenly be Sandie and be dressed up like a marionette doll, performing a striptease for 500 extras. So that was pretty wild. (Laughs.) So when Last Night in Soho finished, I just thought, “I just have one character to give everything to,” and that was a relief.

There was some very exciting news last year involving you and Dr. George Miller. Since the Furiosa announcement, have you had more and more time to pick his very unique brain?

Yes, I am so lucky, genuinely, to say that I have. Even at this stage in the process, working with him is like going to university. I love the conversations that we have. I love the way that we talk not just about the character but the story as a whole. I adore him already, and I haven’t even met the man in person yet.

***

Last Night in Soho opens in movie theaters on Oct. 29.

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