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Offbeat U.S. won't bring up human rights at Singapore summit, say officials

13:15  11 june  2018
13:15  11 june  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

Singapore will bear some costs of Trump-Kim summit: minister

  Singapore will bear some costs of Trump-Kim summit: minister Singapore will bear some of the cost of the planned summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, its defense minister Ng Eng Hen said on Saturday, a day after Trump put the meeting back on agenda.Kim's trip to Singapore, which would be the furthest he would have traveled as leader, poses logistical challenges that are likely to include using Soviet-era aircraft to carry him and his limousine, as well as dozens of security and other staff.

Human rights activists say the U . S . has to press for concessions on human rights as part of the nuclear negotiations, because the only way North Korea will denuclearize is if the character of the regime also changes. "The North Koreans have no interest in denuclearization," Sifton said .

The White House has decided not to bring up the issue of human rights when Donald Trump meets Kim Jong Un at their summit in Singapore on Former Obama administration officials who spoke to NBC News agreed that it was appropriate, but other experts think that ignoring the issue is not only

WASHINGTON — Wounded from torture and starving, Grace Jo's father died on a train heading to a North Korean prison camp, a fellow inmate told his family. His crime: illegally possessing a bag of rice during the 1990s famine.

Jo escaped across the river to China in 1998, and is now a U.S. citizen and college student in suburban Washington. She is deeply concerned that President Donald Trump is preparing to make peace with the "monster," as she put it, who runs her native country.

The Trump-Kim summit will take place at the Capella Hotel in Singapore

  The Trump-Kim summit will take place at the Capella Hotel in Singapore The Capella Hotel, located a quarter-mile off the coast, promises the "tranquility" of Sentosa Island.The five-star Capella Hotel, located a quarter-mile off the mainland, promises the "tranquility" of Sentosa Island amid the "vibrance" of the "cosmopolitan" city-state, according to the hotel's website.

Say a lot with a little. When you see a Tweet you love, tap the heart — it lets the person who wrote it know you shared the love. Spread the word. But, but, but, but the Mango Mussolini said in his press conference yesterday that he WAS going to bring up human rights violations with Little Rocket Man.

news U . S . won ' t bring up human rights at Singapore summit , officials say . Pollack believes the risk of summit meltdown was reduced with the diplomatic toing and froing that accompanied its cancellation and subsequent reinstatement. "This episode seems to have helped to acquaint the two sides with

"He should not make a deal with terrorists," Jo told NBC News. "This regime will never give up its nuclear development."

When Trump meets Kim Jong Un in Singapore on Tuesday, he will be sitting down with the leader of one of the most brutal and repressive regimes in modern history — a country that has committed "unspeakable atrocities" on a vast scale in a manner reminiscent of Nazi Germany, according to a 2014 United Nations investigation.

UN-SECURITY COUNCIL-NORTH KOREANorth Korean refugees Grace Jo, left, and Jung Gwang-il at a news conference before a United Nations Security Council meeting on North Korea on Dec. 10, 2015. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC UN-SECURITY COUNCIL-NORTH KOREANorth Korean refugees Grace Jo, left, and Jung Gwang-il at a news conference before a United Nations Security Council meeting on North Korea on Dec. 10, 2015.

But two administration officials tell NBC News the U.S. has decided not to bring up human rights at the summit. And Trump has made clear he would be willing to offer security guarantees and financial aid to Kim if he gives up his nuclear arsenal.

Trump and Kim could meet for second day in Singapore

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President Donald Trump won ' t address rampant human rights abuses in North Korea when he meets with Kim Jong Un in Singapore on Tuesday, NBC The summit is seemingly designed to focus on North Korea' s nuclear arsenal, though the details surrounding it remain hazy and it' s not clear exactly

Memorable moments from the Singapore summit . Singapore summit : How did we get here? Whether nuclear disarmament is indeed the final outcome of Tuesday' s summit won ' t be known for Trump also said he hopes to eventually withdraw US forces from South Korea, but said "that' s not

"This would be with Kim Jong Un something where ... he'd be running his country," Trump said last month. "If we make a deal, I think Kim Jong Un is going to be very, very happy."

Trump put it more starkly than his predecessors, but he is following decades of U.S. policy that has prioritized addressing North Korea's nuclear threat over holding the regime accountable for the murder, torture, rape and starvation it has perpetrated against its own citizens.

Two former Obama administration officials, who did not want to speak publicly about the matter, said that is appropriate, although they said Trump should seek human rights concessions after a nuclear deal is consummated.

But the experts and activists who focus on human rights in North Korea call that phased approach a big mistake, for strategic as well as moral reasons.

On a practical level, they argue, verification of any nuclear deal would rely on international inspections. With that in mind, they say, the U.S. and its allies will never be able to substantiate North Korean claims to have given up its nuclear weapons; under a totalitarian regime like Kim Jong Un's, anyone who might talk to international nuclear inspectors can be dragged off to prison camps.

Rodman will be in Singapore during Kim Jong Un, Donald Trump summit

  Rodman will be in Singapore during Kim Jong Un, Donald Trump summit Dennis Rodman will travel to Singapore to be in the city for the summit between Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump, he announced Friday in an Instagram post. In his post, Rodman said he will "be flying to Singapore for the historical Summit. I'll give whatever support is needed to my friends, President (Donald) Trump and Marshall Kim Jong Un.

But two administration officials tell NBC News the U . S . has decided not to bring up human rights at the summit . And Trump has made clear he would be willing to offer security guarantees and financial aid to Kim if he gives up his nuclear arsenal. "This would be with Kim Jong Un something where

But two administration officials tell NBC News the U . S . has decided not to bring up human rights at the summit . Experts and activists who focus on Ahead of Tuesday’ s summit , several high-profile defectors, who escaped the regime’ s rights abuses and repression, are considering a question that

DigitalGlobe satellite imagery of Sinuiju concentration camp (Kyo-hwa-so No. 3) - a reeducation camp in North Korea.A satellite image shows the Sinuiju concentration camp, also known as © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC DigitalGlobe satellite imagery of Sinuiju concentration camp (Kyo-hwa-so No. 3) - a reeducation camp in North Korea.A satellite image shows the Sinuiju concentration camp, also known as "Camp 3," in North Korea in 2016.

"As long as you have a society where every scientist, engineer and solider lives in fear of him and his family being sent to Camp 16, we are never going to get straight answers," said Joshua Stanton, a retired Army officer whose web site, OneFreeKorea.com, chronicles North Korea's prison camps.

Camp 16, also known as Hwason Camp, is a concentration camp very close to the Punggye-ri nuclear test site that holds political detainees who have no chance of being released. They are subjected to forced labor and torture, according to international investigations.

In 1994, North Korea agreed with the Clinton administration to freeze its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of sanctions and full normalization of relations with the U.S. But North Korea cheated on the agreement by secretly enriching uranium, undetected by international inspectors. Now, U.S. intelligence analysts believe the regime has 20 to 60 nuclear weapons, and is close to perfecting a long-range nuclear armed missile that could hit the U.S. mainland.

Fox News host calls President Trump a dictator, apologizes

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The 2018 North Korea–United States Singapore Summit , commonly known as Singapore Summit , was a summit meeting between North Korean Chairman Kim Jong-un and U . S . President Donald

up human rights at Tuesday' s summit with Kim Jong Un, the leader of one of the most brutal and repressive regimes in the world, two Trump administration officials tell NBC That follows decades of U . S . policy that prioritized the nuclear threat the country has posed over the murder, torture, rape and

"You can't really have a verifiable nuclear deal with an authoritarian closed government," said John Sifton, a researcher with Human Rights Watch. "You have to have some transparency, otherwise you won't be able to verify."

Ironically, opponents of the Iran nuclear deal forged by President Barack Obama — and abandoned by Trump this year — made similar arguments. But experts point out that while Iran's theocracy is deeply repressive, it allows a level of political and economic freedom that is orders of magnitude different from North Korea. And the CIA said the verification of the Iran deal had been working.

In North Korea, "the vast political and security apparatus strategically uses surveillance, coercion, fear and punishment to preclude the expression of any dissent," a 2014 report by the U.N. Human Rights Commission found. "Public executions and enforced disappearance to political prison camps serve as the ultimate means to terrorize the population into submission."

Michael Kirby, the Australian diplomat who led the U.N. investigation, said North Korea's crimes are "strikingly similar" to those of the Nazis during World War II. Future generations, he said, will wonder why the international community failed to take action to stop them.

That is the basis of the moral argument human rights activists make about a North Korean nuclear deal that sidesteps human rights.

'Don't expect too much': Rodman plays down Kim Trump breakthrough

  'Don't expect too much': Rodman plays down Kim Trump breakthrough Former US basketball star Dennis Rodman flew into Singapore late Monday ahead of at summit betwen President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un, playing down expectations of an immediate breakthrough at the historic meeting. Rodman, who has struck up an unlikely friendship with the basketball loving North Korean leader, arrived in the city-state some nine hours before Trump meets with Kim in a bid to negotiate an end to a decades-old nuclear stand-off.He said he expected the Trump-Kim summit to "go fairly well" but added "people should not expect too much for the first time".

But two administration officials tell NBC News the U . S . has decided not to bring up human rights at the summit . And Trump has made clear he would be willing to offer security guarantees and financial aid to Kim if he gives up his nuclear arsenal. NBC Posted at 9:15 am on June 11, 2018.

SINGAPORE — President Donald Trump is rolling the dice as he walks into a historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un here Tuesday: He The choice facing Kim is whether to give up his nuclear capabilities in exchange for sanctions relief and possibly other concessions from the U . S . or

"How can we guarantee the existence of a regime that is committing crimes against humanity and holding 120,000 men, women and children in prison camps?" asked Greg Scarlatoiu, executive director of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea.

Image: Kim Jong Un Inspects Construction Site of Wonsan-Kalma CoastalNorth Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects the construction site of the Wonsan-Kalma coastal tourist area in Wonsan on May 26, 2018. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: Kim Jong Un Inspects Construction Site of Wonsan-Kalma CoastalNorth Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects the construction site of the Wonsan-Kalma coastal tourist area in Wonsan on May 26, 2018.

Trump himself is well aware of this record. He spoke about it in detail in a speech to the South Korean Parliament in November, and he hosted six North Korean defectors in the Oval Office in February, a meeting arranged by Scarlatoiu.

"An estimated 100,000 North Koreans suffer in gulags, toiling in forced labor and enduring torture, starvation, rape and murder on a constant basis," Trump said in the speech. "In one known instance, a 9-year-old boy was imprisoned for 10 years because his grandfather was accused of treason. In another, a student was beaten in school for forgetting a single detail about the life of Kim Jong Un."

Trump added: "All responsible nations must join forces to isolate the brutal regime of North Korea — to deny it and any form — any form of it. You cannot support, you cannot supply, you cannot accept."

Hyeonseo Lee, a defector who was at the Oval Office meeting, told Trump that she "really wanted to shout with joy because I was so moved."

Now, Trump is speaking much differently as he entertains the possibility of a nuclear deal, despite a CIA assessment revealed by NBC News that North Korea has no intention of giving up its nuclear weapons capability.

Dennis Rodman arrives in Singapore ahead of U.S.-North Korea summit

  Dennis Rodman arrives in Singapore ahead of U.S.-North Korea summit The former NBA player and Kim Jong Un whisperer reportedly arrived a day before Kim's scheduled historic meeting with President Trump.Rodman emerged from the baggage claim area at Changi Airport around midnight local time Monday and told reporters he wasn't sure if he would meet Kim while the two are in Singapore. The North Korean leader is scheduled to leave at 4 p.m. local time Wednesday, some seven hours after his scheduled visit with the U.S. president.

That, of course, brings us to the four-point Singapore declaration released by the two leaders. In the sense that the summit is an improvement over nuclear war, it was a success—Washington and Pyongyang will likely keep up a pageantry and bilateral momentum out of Singapore for some time.

SINGAPORE -- When President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meet for the first time here When discussing U . S . goals for the summit , administration officials and the president rarely The official said Japan was not insisting on pressing North Korea on broader human rights violations.

Human rights activists say the U.S. has to press for concessions on human rights as part of the nuclear negotiations, because the only way North Korea will denuclearize is if the character of the regime also changes.

"The North Koreans have no interest in denuclearization," Sifton said. "The best shot we would ever have at denuclearization is if we have broader negotiations, which leads to more openness, which leads to reform or collapse of the regime. You may as well negotiate for things you can get, like scrapping their ICBMs and opening up to the U.N., and hope that leads to changes."

Human Rights Watch was one of 300 organizations that sent a letter to Kim Jong Un this week urging him to improve his country's human rights situation.

While Trump appears to have decided not to demand human rights concessions, he may not have the last word. Under a law passed in 2016 with the backing of key Republicans, Congress imposed mandatory sanctions on North Korea, and required that any significant permanent change to those sanctions be approved by Congress.

"Congress needs to be involved in this," said Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., during a Foreign Relations Committee hearing Tuesday. "We might have to act, because our sanctions regime is mandatory."

Some scholars have argued that such requirements are an unconstitutional infringement on a president's right to conduct foreign affairs and might not survive a court challenge.

There also appears to be language in the law that allows a president to waive the requirements for national security reasons, although that is contested.

However, some Republicans say they have been told that the Trump administration would submit a North Korean deal to the Senate for approval as a treaty.

"The president, the vice president and the secretary of state have all told me separately that their intent is to put together a treaty that will be submitted to the United States Senate under the Constitution for certification," Sen. James Risch of Idaho said Tuesday.

Risch contrasted what he said would be the Trump approach with the Obama administration's decision to forge an Iran deal without Congress.

"They know that the Constitution requires them to not only get consent but to get advice," he said.

Jo, who escaped from North Korea while still mourning her father's death, hopes that the U.S. will not forget about the 25 million North Koreans who live in what she calls a virtual prison.

"This is not the time," she said, "for the U.S. government to stop the pressure."

N. Korea military 'all quiet' ahead of summit: Mattis .
The North Korean military shows no signs of unusual activity or being in a heightened state of readiness ahead of a historic summit in Singapore, US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Monday. "All's quiet," Mattis told Pentagon reporters when asked his assessment of North Korean military activity. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is due to meet with President Donald Trump on Tuesday in Singapore, capping a remarkable build-up to the summit that Trump at one point canceled.Mattis also repeated earlier comments that, as far as he knew, the large US troop presence in South Korea would not factor into discussions.

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