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Offbeat Apple to undercut popular law-enforcement tool for cracking iPhones

23:31  13 june  2018
23:31  13 june  2018 Source:   reuters.com

Apple’s WWDC 2018: Here’s what to expect

  Apple’s WWDC 2018: Here’s what to expect Wondering what to expect at Apple’s WWDC event later today? Let’s start with the most obvious stuff first. iOS 12 is expected to be announced today, but it’s mostly going to bring stability and performance improvements, some health and parental control features, a revamped iBooks experience for reading ebooks, and some ways to cut down on how much time you spend on your phone.

But, according to Grayshift, the box takes between two to three hours to crack the phone’s passcode. Such iPhone unlocking tools are growing popular among law enforcement agencies. “The availability and affordability of these tools undercuts law enforcement ’s continual assertions

"The availability and affordability of these tools undercuts law enforcement 's continual assertions that they need smartphone vendors to be forced to build Because of the ongoing cat and mouse game of Apple patching a vulnerability as third-party iPhone cracking services look for new methods to get

FILE - This Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016 file photo shows an iPhone in Washington. © AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File FILE - This Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016 file photo shows an iPhone in Washington. Apple Inc said on Wednesday it will change its iPhone settings to undercut the most popular means for law enforcement to break into the devices.

The company told Reuters it was aiming to protect customers in countries where police seize phones at will and all users from the risk that the attack technique will leak to spies and criminals.

The privacy standard-bearer of the tech industry said it will change the default settings in the iPhone operating system to cut off communication through the USB port when the phone has not been unlocked in the past hour. That port is how machines made by forensic companies GrayShift, Cellebrite and others connect and get around the security provisions that limit how many password guesses can be made before the device freezes them out or erases data.

(Reporting by Joseph Menn; Editing by Greg Mitchell and David Gregorio)

Here's what Apple's doing to get you excited about AR .
<p>The long-awaited Magic Leap might emerge this year. Microsoft's Hololens has hung in a state of enterprise limbo -- one from which it may finally emerge next year. Little smartglasses like ODG's might get better with Qualcomm's next chips, but don't expect miracles.</p>Then there's Apple. As CNET reported in April, Apple is working on a powerful headset capable of both AR and VR. Whether that version is a "what if" prototype or something akin to what Apple may ship in 2 years is anyone's guess. But you don't need to wait until 2020: Apple's plans for virtual magic are playing out in real-time, right now, on the iPads and iPhones that your currently own.

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