•   
  •   
  •   

Offbeat Seeking asylum, migrant caravan mom calls for family reunification

00:36  14 june  2018
00:36  14 june  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

U.S. may house migrant kids at military bases in Texas

  U.S. may house migrant kids at military bases in Texas HHS officials will tour three bases in Texas to see if they are suitable to house unaccompanied migrant children, who now number more than 11,000.As of Sunday, nearly 300 of the 550 children currently in custody at U.S. border stations had spent more than 72 hours there, the time limit for immigrants of any age to be held in the government's temporary facilities. Almost half of those 300 children are younger than 12, according to the document, meaning they are classified by the Department of Homeland Security as "tender age children.

Central American Migrants Who Reached the Border by Caravan Have Started Seeking U.S. Asylum . President Donald Trump and members of his Cabinet have been tracking the caravan of migrants , calling it a threat to the U.S. since it started March 25 in the Mexican city of Tapachula

How long members of a migrant caravan seeking asylum will have to wait to plead their case is just the beginning of an uncertain and potentially monthslong process. Pence: Caravan moms , kids are often 'victims of open border advocates'.

US must stop separating migrant children from parents: UN

  US must stop separating migrant children from parents: UN The United Nations on Tuesday urged Washington to immediately halt its controversial practice of separating asylum-seeking Central American immigrant children from their parents at the southern border. The UN rights office said it was "deeply concerned" over the "zero tolerance" policy introduced by the administration of US President Donald Trump in a bid to deter illegal immigration.

Earlier this month, 600 migrants left Mexico City en route to the United States to apply for asylum . He used the subject to criticize Mexico for its failure to stop the group and to call for Congress to enact stricter immigration Tags Kirstjen Nielsen Donald Trump migrant caravan Mexico Central America.

The caravan stopped in Mexicali on its way to Tijuana, where migrants plan to seek asylum . He said he knew of two families that had separated from the caravan and were kidnapped. They are now free, he said. "We have prevented 10, 20, 100 kidnappings with this caravan ," Call said in Spanish.

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Maritza Flores Delgado's day revolves around one phone call.That phone call can come at all hours of the day, and can last for as little as five minutes or as long as ten.

"I don't need long to tell if she's alright," said Delgado, 31, smiling.The call is from her 18-year-old daughter, Laura. The teen was separated from her mother and three sisters at the San Ysidro Port of Entry and is in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in San Diego, California.

Every call begins with a robotic voice that says, "you have received a phone call from a detainee at Otay Mesa, press one to accept, or two to end this call.

"Delgado eagerly presses one.

Laura's voice comes over the phone, "Hola, Mamá?"

"Si, mi amor," or, yes, my love, replies Delgado.

Central American mother, children from migrant caravan seeking refuge in Chicago

  Central American mother, children from migrant caravan seeking refuge in Chicago CHICAGO - The children chased each other through the house, stopping only to take turns on the trampoline or munch on Mexican sweet bread - their laughter not revealing a language barrier. They were strangers just 24 hours before, but here they were, along with their parents, living under the same roof on Chicago's South Side, their lives intertwined for the foreseeable future. Maritza Flores CHICAGO - The children chased each other through the house, stopping only to take turns on the trampoline or munch on Mexican sweet bread - their laughter not revealing a language barrier.

The Central Americans, many traveling as families , on Sunday (April 29) will test the Trump administration’s tough rhetoric criticizing the caravan when the migrants begin seeking asylum by turning themselves in to border News. Kushner Calls For Unity At Jerusalem Embassy Dedication.

With this in mind, the migrants sought support from Mexico-based and U.S. allies. Together, the organizers chose to go public with their mission, calling on Americans to contact DHS to urge the authorities not to detain the caravan members on August 10.

Delgado is among the many mothers or fathers who say they don't know when they'll see their children next as they go through immigration and asylum proceedings.

Because Delgado and her family presented themselves at a port of entry, they are not being prosecuted under Attorney General Jeff Sessions' "zero tolerance" policy announced a few days after the family arrived in the U.S. The policy seeks to prosecute 100 percent of adults illegally crossing the border, but not people who legally present themselves at the border.

While Delgado's 18-year-old daughter is counted as an adult, Session's policy has resulted in parents being sent to jails and young children being held separately in government custody, sometimes released to sponsors. Those children are first held by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and then transferred to the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, along with children who traveled to the U.S. alone.

Ex-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies

  Ex-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies Former federal ethics chief Walter Shaub called on President Trump to end its migrant policies on Sunday, referring to the policies as "monstrous" in a tweet. "Dry your eyes and focus. Your problems are nothing compared to the problems you're creating for the terrified children you're ripping from the arms of desperate parents at the border. This is monstrous. Stop it. Stop it now!" Shaub said in a tweet directed at Trump. Dry your eyes and focus. Your problems are nothing compared to the problems you're creating for the terrified children you're ripping from the arms of desperate parents at the border. This is monstrous. Stop it.

Migrants associated with a “Central American Caravan ” showed up at the United States border Sunday reportedly seeking asylum from gang violence, but many decided to “tie the knot” upon hearing news from their legal counsel that they may face separation when entering the U.S.

The group of 18 caravan asylum -seekers gave 12 reasons why they are seeking asylum . But “political unrest,” “fear of crime,” “ family reunification ,” “instability,” “violence,” and “unemployment” are not grounds for asylum in the United States, Andrew told Breitbart News.

As of last week, roughly 550 children remained in the custody of Border Patrol, many of them separated from their parents at the U.S. border as part of the Trump Administration's new "zero tolerance" policy for border crossings. Nearly 300 of those children had been in custody at border stations longer than the 72-hour limit for immigrants to be held in the government's temporary facilities, according to a U.S. officials and a document obtained by NBC News. Nearly half of those children were under the age of 12. From May 6 to May 19, 658 children were separated from their parents at the border, an official with U.S. Customs and Border Protection told Congress recently.

Delgado was detained for a few weeks and not separated from her younger children. Her daughter Laura is considered an adult and is still being held in ICE detention.

After Delgado's phone call with her daughter, she began to sob.

"We came fleeing violence in our countries and now we have to confront this," Delgado said, as tears ran down her face. "There are many mothers separated from their families, these families don't know where their children are. And there are many other families just like me, simply waiting, waiting for calls, waiting for their children to be released."

Trump admin discussed splitting migrant moms, kids in Feb. 2017

  Trump admin discussed splitting migrant moms, kids in Feb. 2017 Notes from a DHS meeting show it was one of the methods discussed for discouraging asylum seekers.WASHINGTON — The idea of separating migrant children from their mothers was discussed during the earliest days of the Trump administration as a way to deter asylum seekers, according to notes from a closed door DHS meeting.

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - At least 200 Central American migrants in a “ caravan ” traveling through Mexico that provoked the ire of U.S. President Donald Trump plan to seek asylum in the United States, organizers said on Monday.

The Central Americans, many travelling as families , will test the Trump administration's tough rhetoric criticizing the caravan on Sunday when they begin seeking asylum by turning themselves in to Trump's tweets stall Central American migrant caravan amidst calls for U.S. asylum process reform.

Delgado and her four daughters surrendered on May 4 at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego, California and requested asylum. The family traveled with a migrant caravan, made up of almost one thousand Central Americans, who traveled to the U.S. border to seek asylum."

I recognize America is a nation of laws," Delgado said, "That is why we came to America the legal way, why we surrendered at the border and asked for asylum.

"But Delgado's journey began long before the caravan did.

Her family fled El Salvador almost ten years ago after Delgado's father was tortured and murdered by criminal gangs. Delgado said gangs dismembered her father's body and scattered the pieces throughout his farmland.

Ever since, the family has been running in fear.They moved to Guatemala and tried to hide from the gangs for six years. But Delgado said a gang member, with tattoos all over his face, found them. So Delgado moved her family yet again, to Mexico. They lived another six years, hiding in a border town near Guatemala, until the same tattooed man appeared at her door, she said.

Throughout the three countries, this gang member continually promised Delgado gangs would leave her alone if she handed over her daughters to him, she said.

Delgado said she realized her only option was to seek asylum in the U.S. She had heard about a migrant caravan, families fleeing gang violence and political persecution, headed to the U.S. to seek asylum. Days later, they joined the caravan.

Trump says he'll cut off foreign aid to countries that send 'not their best' people

  Trump says he'll cut off foreign aid to countries that send 'not their best' people "When countries abuse us by sending their people up – not their best – we're not going to give any more aid to those countries," Trump says.President Donald Trump said Tuesday he wants to cut off aid to countries that "abuse" the United States by sending "not their best" people to its border, describing the proposal as a bipartisan approach.

More: Migrant caravan : Parents seeking asylum in U.S. fear forcible separation from children. About 80 U.S. families have also offered to sponsor migrants seeking asylum , said Heather Cronk, co-director of Showing Up For Racial Justice, a group that supports racial-justice issues.

The Swedish Migration Agency considers applications from people who want to visit, live in or seek asylum in Sweden, or who want to become Swedish citizens. If you have the right to family reunification , you may be covered by what is called a ‘maintenance requirement’.

Weeks later, as Delgado relayed her family's history to immigration officials during her credible fear interview in detention, she said officials said it all sounded like a made up story.

On Monday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that "generally" claims on domestic and gang violence will no longer qualify for asylum, reversing an immigration court's ruling.Advocates and attorneys fear the move would make it nearly impossible for families like Delgado's to be granted asylum.

Delgado passed her credible fear interview and was released, along with her three youngest daughters, Mariana, 16, Skarleth, 6, and Perla, 3, into the care of Liz Gres and her husband, Pete DeMay, in Chicago.

Gres was paired with Delgado through a racial justice organization, Showing Up for Racial Justice, who created a database of over 150 families throughout the country to sponsor families from the migrant caravan.The couple, who have two young children of their own, agreed to sponsor and house the Delgado family for as long as they need.

"My parents emigrated to America from Poland," Gres said, "It's the American way."

As DeMay rode bicycles and scooters with Delgado's three girls and his own two children, Delgado looked on, smiling.

While she is incredibly appreciative of the hospitality this family has shown them, she can't fully enjoy it.

"Half of my heart is there with my daughter," she said, "How can we be good here, when she is still in detention there?"

Delgado, who is required to wear an ankle monitor at all times, has not received an asylum hearing but must check in at the ICE Chicago office with her three daughters every couple of weeks.

Guatemalan mom set to reunite with 7-year-old son at Baltimore airport after suing Trump administration

  Guatemalan mom set to reunite with 7-year-old son at Baltimore airport after suing Trump administration A Guatemalan mom was counting down the minutes Thursday to reunification with her 7-year-old son at a Baltimore airport, a spokeswoman for her legal team told the Daily News. Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia was due to be reunited with Darwin after she sued the government for tearing her from her son under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy toward migrants seeking asylum at the U.S. border, the spokeswoman, Rebecca Brooks, said.

Activists, seeking asylum on Easter, are headed for a showdown as they approach the US border. PJ Media, another conservative platform, cast the caravan in similar terms, but took it one step further. In a piece titled “New Wave of Migrants from Central America Headed to U.S.,” Rick Moran calls it

The caravan got attention after President Donald Trump and members of his Cabinet called it a threat to the United States. President Donald Trump says a caravan of Central American migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. shows the weakness of the nation's immigration laws.

Delgado's daughter Laura has yet to receive a credible fear interview.When asked what Delgado would do if Laura were deported, she shook her head and cried.

"If we go back, we'll be killed," she said.Delgado said that migrants in the caravan discussed the possibility of families being separated but she never thought it would be anything like this. "What we found here was abuse and separation of families," she added.

During many of her phone calls, Delgado said her daughter describes prison-like conditions inside Otay Mesa, run by CoreCivic, a private prison company formerly known as Corrections Corporations of America.When Delgado tried to deliver a message to Laura, authorities told her, "This isn't a hotel, we don't deliver messages like that."

Earlier this month, 37 immigrants, all currently detained in Otay Mesa Detention Center in San Diego, California, wrote an open letter condemning the conditions at the center.

An ICE spokesperson wrote to NBC News in an email and said an ICE compliance unit is currently looking into the complaints alleged in the letter.Delgado witnessed a mother as she was separated from her two young boys in a detention center. She said the mother stopped eating and sleeping and cried all day and night.

"We are humans," Delgado said, tears falling onto her shirt, "And children only get one family, all we are asking is for the reunification of our families."

FOLLOW NBC LATINO ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM.

Watch the emotional reunion of a mother and son separated at the border .
Beata Mejia-Mejia says she had no idea where her son was for more than a month . Migrant children at the border – the factsAsylum-seekers must go to an official port of entry to enter the U.S. legally, something Mejia-Mejia did not do. She and her son Darwin were taken to a detention center in Arizona. One day they called him by his name, she told CBS News' Weijia Jiang, and took him away. A senior official told CBS News about 500 children have been reunited with their families since May. It's unclear how many of them are being detained with their families or remain in the U.S.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!