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Offbeat Will Kavanaugh Provide Cover for Trump?

22:55  10 july  2018
22:55  10 july  2018 Source:   nytimes.com

Trump mulls Supreme Court choice from 2 or 3 candidates

  Trump mulls Supreme Court choice from 2 or 3 candidates President Donald Trump is mulling his choice for Supreme Court justice. The president, who is at his private golf club in New Jersey, says he has narrowed his choice to "three or two." Ahead of a Monday night announcement from the East Room in the White House, the president told reporters he was focused on four people and "of the four people I have it down to three or two." He was having dinner Friday night with Vice President Mike Pence, who has also been meeting with the finalists.

On Monday President Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh , a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court.

Опубликовано: 9 июл. 2018 г. Trump picks Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court. Nigel Farage blasts Sadiq Khan for Trump blimp - Продолжительность: 6:30 Fox News 10 440 просмотров.

a couple of people standing next to a person in a suit and tie: Brett Kavanaugh, left, in 2006 when he was sworn in as a U.S. Court of Appeals Judge for the District of Columbia by Justice Anthony Kennedy. © Paul J. Richards/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Brett Kavanaugh, left, in 2006 when he was sworn in as a U.S. Court of Appeals Judge for the District of Columbia by Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

On Monday President Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh, a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. In the coming weeks, the Senate will undertake its constitutional duty to vet Judge Kavanaugh on issues like health care and abortion. But the Senate must also explore a question central to evaluating the judge’s commitment to the rule of law: Does he have the requisite independence from President Trump to serve as a check on his abuses of power?

Dem senator: Trump's Supreme Court pick shows he's 'terrified of Robert Mueller'

  Dem senator: Trump's Supreme Court pick shows he's 'terrified of Robert Mueller' Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) on Monday laid into President Trump for nominating Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, saying he did so to protect himself in the ongoing Russia probe. Merkley suggested Trump picked Kavanaugh because of the judge's past writings that argue a president should be shielded from ongoing investigations.

Andrew Cohen's Most Recent Stories. Why Brett Kavanaugh Will Carry Trump ’s Water. Court nominees are taught to say about respecting precedent and keeping an open mind – “I interpret the law, not make the law,” he has said – and that will give Collins all the cover she needs to vote for him.

President Donald Trump has announced Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee for the US Supreme Court, picking a conservative federal appeals court judge who survived a previous tough Senate confirmation battle.

This issue is particularly important given repeated claims by the president’s attorneys that Mr. Trump is essentially above the law — that he can even refuse a subpoena to testify. Given the looming Mueller investigation, these weighty, knotty constitutional questions may soon come before the court.

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When it comes to these questions, Judge Kavanaugh is not a blank slate. He worked for Ken Starr, the independent counsel who aggressively investigated President Bill Clinton. But Judge Kavanaugh later adopted views that are outside the mainstream in their deference to the executive.

In a 2009 law review article, Judge Kavanaugh argued that a sitting president should be able to defer civil suits and criminal prosecutions until after he leaves office and should be excused from having to answer depositions or questions during his term. He went so far as to advocate that Congress “consider a law exempting a president — while in office — from criminal prosecution and investigation, including from questioning by criminal prosecutors or defense counsel.”

McConnell to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick Tuesday

  McConnell to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick Tuesday Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will meet with Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court pick, on Tuesday as he begins to build support on Capitol Hill. Kavanaugh will meet with McConnell and Vice President Pence at 11:15 a.m., according to guidance from the White House. The meeting comes after Trump announced on Monday night that he would nominate Kavanaugh-currently a judge on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit- to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Trump just nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be his second Supreme Court justice. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down.

Dahlia Lithwick, legal correspondent and senior editor for Slate.com, talks with Rachel Maddow about Brett Kavanaugh 's previously stated position on whether

It is hard to imagine that these extreme views weren’t part of Judge Kavanaugh’s appeal to President Trump, a man who is a defendant in several civil suits and the subject of at least one criminal investigation. According to media reports, the White House has looked at the judge’s views on indicting a sitting president.

Nor are these mere academic musings. During his service on the appellate court, Judge Kavanaugh has written opinions reflecting an expansive view of presidential power, and on several occasions he has expressed concern about executive branch agencies that are insulated from direct control by the president.

What does this tell us about how he would view the ongoing investigation by Robert Mueller, the special counsel? There are important and — at least under current law — decisive differences between the independence enjoyed by the agencies at issue in those cases and that of the special counsel, who reports directly to a political appointee serving at the pleasure of the president. But the logic employed in Judge Kavanaugh’s opinions could easily be extended to argue that the president should enjoy the power to control the course of all criminal investigations — including those into his own alleged misconduct.

Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite

  Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite Rick Santorum said Monday that President Donald Trump "bowed to the elite in Washington" by picking Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his Supreme Court nominee. "Well, I think that Donald Trump said he was going to energize the base with this pick. I don't think he did that," the Republican former Pennsylvania senator and CNN political commentator told Chris Cuomo on CNN's "Cuomo PrimeTime." Kavanaugh has been dubbed a Washington insider, having worked in both Bush administrations, and is currently a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit.

Kavanaugh became Trump ’s second lifetime appointment to the nation’s highest judicial body in his 18 months in office. Kavanaugh is a well-known figure in Washington and has been involved in some of the biggest controversies of the past two decades.

Read: Trump set to make Supreme Court even more pro-business. If confirmed, the addition of Kavanaugh will likely create a solidly conservative five-judge majority on the high This will cover 4,629 per year in retirement income . Follow this link to find the top 3 financial advisors for you.

Judge Kavanaugh’s approach to executive power could, moreover, affect other aspects of the federal investigations relating to Mr. Trump. One of the most important is whether a president can pardon himself. In our view, the idea that a president can grant himself a pardon is anathema to our constitutional structure. One need not be a judge to see how antithetical this is to our Constitution: 85 percent of Americans (including 75 percent of Republicans) say that it is unacceptable for a president to pardon himself of a crime. Given Judge Kavanaugh’s position on executive authority, it is unclear where he would stand. Senators must find out.

Judge Kavanaugh’s writings and opinions also suggest he will be receptive to the bizarre argument that the president cannot obstruct justice by firing Department of Justice officials or taking other actions pursuant to his constitutional authority. There are multiple flaws in this argument, chief among them that both the Constitution and hundreds of years of precedent support the validity of congressional restrictions on the exercise of executive power. Will Judge Kavanaugh stand with the rule of law or allow the president to interfere with our system of justice with impunity?

Donald Trump says he did not discuss abortion with Brett Kavanaugh

  Donald Trump says he did not discuss abortion with Brett Kavanaugh President Donald Trump praises Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, while Democrats plan to oppose him over the abortion issue."No, I haven't, I really haven't," Trump told reporters as he left the White House for a week-long trip to Europe.

President Trump announced his choice to nominate Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court to fill the vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Kavanaugh would solidify the court's conservative majority.

Brett Kavanaugh is nominated by Trump to succeed Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. by Robert Costa, Robert Barnes and Felicia Sonmez July 9 at 9:36 PM Email the author. The path ahead for Trump �€™s second nominee to the Supreme Court.

Then there is the legality of Mr. Mueller’s appointment, which Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, has already tested in the two federal courts where he is facing charges. Both the District of Columbia and Virginia federal district courts rejected motions by Mr. Manafort to dismiss his criminal indictments, and the District of Columbia court rejected a collateral civil suit that he filed there challenging Mr. Mueller’s prosecution of the case. The reasoning behind these decisions is straightforward: Congress has given the attorney general broad authority to delegate power to subordinate officials. We cannot help wondering whether Judge Kavanaugh will view this delegation as an intrusion on presidential direct removal authority and reject the commonsense holdings of these lower courts should he have the chance.

The usual practice at Supreme Court confirmation hearings is for the nominee to refuse to answer questions about issues that may come before him or her. But we have never had a nominee who was chosen by a president identified as the subject of a criminal inquiry — one that already has resulted in serious charges against top aides and could implicate the president himself. We need to know the judge’s views on these issues so we can have an honest and open national discussion, and the Senate make a fully informed decision.

If he refuses to share them, Judge Kavanaugh must agree that if he is confirmed he will recuse himself from any decisions concerning the special counsel investigation and the related exercise of presidential powers —or his confirmation must be delayed until after the investigations are resolved. If the Senate confirms him without resolving these questions, we face the prospect of a new associate justice who poses a grave danger to the legitimacy of the court — and our democratic system of checks and balances.

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Liberals attack Brett Kavanaugh for 'frat boy' name .
The latest line of attack from liberals against Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, is knocking the judge for his “frat boy”-sounding first name. “We'll be D***ED if we're going to let five MEN—including some frat boy named Brett—strip us of our hard-won bodily autonomy and reproductive rights,” the influential pro-choice organization NARAL tweeted Tuesday.Comedian Stephen Colbert of CBS’ “The Late Show” also mocked Kavanaugh’s name.“Now I don’t know much about Kavanaugh, but I’m skeptical because his name is Brett,” Colbert said during the monologue on his show Tuesday.

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