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Offbeat Why the government missed the deadline to reunite immigrant families

04:05  12 july  2018
04:05  12 july  2018 Source:   latimes.com

Judge to weigh new rules as U.S. works to reunite migrant families

  Judge to weigh new rules as U.S. works to reunite migrant families <p>A federal judge on Friday will consider imposing tougher rules on the U.S. government to ensure it reunites as many as 2,000 immigrant children with their parents by July 26.</p>In a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, U.S. Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego ordered the government in June to reunite families that had been separated after crossing the U.S.-Mexican border. The government failed to meet a Tuesday deadline for reuniting an initial group of children under 5.

The government missed its court-ordered Tuesday deadline to reunite all immigrant children The filing did not explain why at least one U.S. citizen might be in custody with an immigration case. The judge ordered federal officials to reunite the immigrant families after the ACLU filed a class action

On 26 June , Sabraw set the government deadlines to reunite children under 5, who are being held at so called “tender age shelters”, with their families by Tuesday. During the hearing the ACLU also accused the Trump administration of missing 10 children in its count of those in its custody aged 0-5.

a group of people standing next to a fence: The Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children on June 19, 2018 in Homestead, Fla. © Susan Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS The Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children on June 19, 2018 in Homestead, Fla.

WASHINGTON - Criminal background checks, DNA tests, deportations, illnesses and cumbersome communication between three federal government agencies and even more sub-agencies have delayed the reunification of immigrant families that were separated at the border.

The Trump administration was supposed to reunite 102 children under age 5 with their parents by Tuesday, according to a deadline imposed by a federal judge in California. It still has not said how many were actually reunited, but figures released Tuesday indicated only four children had been reunited.

58 children reunited as government reconnects families

  58 children reunited as government reconnects families Fifty-eight immigrant children under the age of 5 have been reunited with their parents after being separated at the border, the Trump administration said in a Thursday evening filing. That was one more than the government had announced earlier in the day. The new tally comes as part of a class action lawsuit the American Civil Liberties Union filed against the administration.Though the deadline for reuniting children under 5 has passed, in two weeks the government will need to reunite thousands more children aged 5 to 17 to meet the judge's next deadline.

In trying to meet the first deadline , the government began with a list of 102 children potentially eligible to be Asked about the missed deadline , the president said: “Well, I have a solution. Related. Testing DNA to reunite immigrant families in U.S. brings social and ethical problems, experts say.

Government falls short of deadline to reunite kids, families . Asked about the missed deadline , the president said: "Well, I have a solution. Tell people not to On Monday, a federal judge in Los Angeles emphatically rejected the Trump administration's efforts to detain immigrant families for an

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who originally set the deadline for reuniting families, reduced the number to 63 Tuesday after testimony by the government on why some families could not be reunited. He also called for a more "streamlined approach" to the process. The federal government will have to testify to Sabraw Thursday on how many children of the 63 they were able to reunite.

The Department of Health and Human Services, which is handling the reunification of families along with the Department of Homeland Security and, to a lesser extent, the Department of Justice, sent an email to lawmakers Tuesday afternoon detailing the process. Some steps will have to be changed, due to Sabraw's ruling.

Reunification is a four-step process once the alleged parent's location is identified, according to the email obtained by McClatchy.

Border officials may have taken child of US citizen into custody

  Border officials may have taken child of US citizen into custody <p>U.S. officials at the southern border may have taken a child of a U.S. citizen into custody, administration lawyers revealed Tuesday. In a court filing to give an update on efforts to reunite families, lawyers for the Department of Justice (DOJ) said the administration is unable to determine if the child was separated from the parent, and the government hasn't been able to locate the parent for more than a year.</p>U.S. officials at the southern border may have taken a child of a U.S. citizen into custody, administration lawyers revealed Tuesday.

Trump administration misses deadline to reunite immigrant children with parents. Federal judge denies Trump administration request for extension to reunite migrant families . Why Study the Russian Revolution?

The government missed its deadline today to reunify all of 98 immigrant children under five years Among the reasons the government gave as to why the others cannot be reunified: 12 Once these measures are taken, the families are being reunited at neutral locations near the HHS youth shelters.

It begins with HHS assessing all alleged parents both for criminal history and for actual relation to the child. All are put through a criminal background check, which eight parents failed, according to the email. Charges for those eight include child cruelty, child smuggling, narcotics crimes, robbery convictions and a warrant for murder. One other parent faces "credible evidence" of child abuse.

Those who pass the criminal background check are submitted for a DNA test, which HHS says has determined five people were not the true parents of the child.

"Some adults claimed to be parents but when approached about doing a DNA test to verify parentage admitted they were not parents," the email reads.

Sabraw told the federal government Tuesday that from now on they could only use DNA tests when they could not verify parentage in other ways, such as birth certificates.

Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Immigrants' Rights Project, which has been challenging the federal government in court, said Sabraw's decision means the health and human services agency can only use DNA tests if they have reason to believe the person is not the parent, rather than in every case. The ruling also means HHS can conduct only one criminal background check, based on fingerprints taken from the parent when they were originally taken into custody. Gelernt said he believes the government has been conducting multiple background checks, furthering delays.

Reuniting separated families: Why is it taking so long?

  Reuniting separated families: Why is it taking so long? HOUSTON — The Trump administration hit a court-ordered deadline Tuesday to return immigrant children under the age of 5 to their parents, forcing the government to roll back many of the family separations that resulted from its "zero-tolerance" border enforcement policy. Last month, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw gave authorities 14 days to reunite parents with children under 5, and 30 days to reunite parents with all other children. Here are Last month, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw gave authorities 14 days to reunite parents with children under 5, and 30 days to reunite parents with all other children.

Asked about the missed deadline , the president said: “Well, I have a solution. Tell people not to come to our On Monday, a federal judge in Los Angeles emphatically rejected the Trump administration’s efforts to detain immigrant families for an Why Is Reuniting Separated Families Taking So Long?

Government misses court-ordered deadline to reunite youngest migrant children with families . " Why was it so easy for them to take our children but so hard to give them back?" asked Digna, 37-year-old Salvadoran mother who has his been separated from her two children since crossing the

"If they don't have red flags before reunification, they can't then say, 'Oh, we need to investigate more,' which is what has been happening," Gelernt said.

At this step of the process, HHS assesses if the parents are being treated for communicable diseases, have already been deported or have already been released within the U.S., according to the email, all of which delays reunification. One parent is being treated for a communicable disease. In another case, HHS identified a living situation where it says an adult in the household has an outstanding warrant for criminal sex abuse of a 10-year-old girl. Both of those families are currently not eligible for reunification.

An additional 10 parents are in criminal custody and will not be reunited with their children until that ends. Eight more have been released into the U.S. and have to undergo additional safety screenings. Another 12 parents have been deported, and HHS said in the email they are working with lawyers for those parents to determine whether the parents wish to have their children deported to their custody.

Pence: 'I do' still want Roe v. Wade to be overturned

  Pence: 'I do' still want Roe v. Wade to be overturned Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday that he still wants Roe v. Wade to be overturned, but declined to say if President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will comply with the campaign promise to do away with the landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide. Kavanaugh has not expressed outright opposition to Roe v. Wade, but abortion rights activists are alarmed that it could be on the chopping block if he is confirmed. During the 2016 campaign, Pence said that he hoped to see the ruling end up on "the ash heap of history," while Trump predicted that Roe v.

The Trump administration said nearly half of the 102 youngest immigrant children who were separated from their parents at the border won’t be reunited with the adults in time to meet a court-imposed deadline .

On June 26, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego ordered the government to reunite children under five years old with their parents by Tuesday. Of the remaining 96 children, the Justice Department predicts it will be able to reunite 59 by Tuesday’s deadline .

If parents pass the criminal background check and are determined to be the child's true parents, they are transferred to Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement, a division within HHS that handles the children who have been separated, then prepares the children to be transported to ICE with their parents.

"Programs will transport the child, the child's possessions, and - if applicable - a supply of necessities (such as medications and diapers) along with the child to an ICE custody," the email reads.

Once the child arrives, the health and human services agency officially transfers custody to ICE, and provides ICE with documentation that the parent "does not present a danger to the child."

The Department of Homeland Security then determines the next steps for the parent and the child, which could include deportation or release into the U.S.

Sabraw has ordered that the more than 2,000 total immigrant children who were separated from their parents at the border be reunited by July 26.

Visit the McClatchy Washington Bureau at www.mcclatchydc.com

The Trump Administration Won't Say How Many Separated Children It's Still Holding. The Clock Is Ticking .
It’s been nearly two weeks since President Donald Trump ordered the end to his administration’s policy of separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border – and the agency in charge of reuniting them won’t say how many of the children are still in its care.&nbsp;Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told lawmakers last week that 2,047 separated minors were in the care of the agency’s Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). But when TIME reached out to HHS to see how many separated minors are still being cared for in HHS-funded facilities on Monday, a spokesperson would only say how many minors remain in their care, generally.

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