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Offbeat States brace for abortion fights after Kavanaugh nomination

17:33  12 july  2018
17:33  12 july  2018 Source:   msn.com

Schumer vows to fight Trump's Supreme Court pick

  Schumer vows to fight Trump's Supreme Court pick The Senate's top Democrat says President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court puts abortion rights and health care protections for women "on the judicial chopping block."New York Sen. Chuck Schumer says by picking Kavanaugh, Trump is delivering on his pledge to "punish" women for their choices.

The day after Brett Kavanaugh ’s nomination to the supreme court, partisan battle lines in the Senate remained unmoved in the coming confirmation fight . Red state Democrats also kept an open mind on Tuesday. 'Five-alarm fire': activists say supreme court pick threatens abortion rights. Read more.

The groundswell for Barrett, unusual in a nomination process, was a foretaste of what the rebellions would look like. And it’s one indicator of a larger truth: One way or another, after Brett Kavanaugh , the politics of abortion will never be the same.

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017, file photo, a Planned Parenthood supporter and opponent try to block each other's signs during a protest and counter-protest of abortion in St. Louis. If a Supreme Court majority shaped by President Donald Trump overturns or weakens the right to abortion, the fight over its legalization could return to the states. (AP Photo/Jim Salter, File)© The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017, file photo, a Planned Parenthood supporter and opponent try to block each other's signs during a protest and counter-protest of abortion in St. Louis. If a Supreme Court majority shaped by President Donald Trump overturns or weakens the right to abortion, the fight over its legalization could return to the states. (AP Photo/Jim Salter, File)

BOSTON — Anticipating renewed fights over abortion, some governors and state lawmakers already are looking for ways to enhance or dismantle the right in their own constitutions and laws.

President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court has raised both fears and hopes that a conservative court majority could weaken or overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that created a nationwide right to abortion. That could fan an already raging battle in states over what should and should not be legal.

2020 White House contenders race to oppose Trump's Supreme Court pick

  2020 White House contenders race to oppose Trump's Supreme Court pick Several Democratic senators considered contenders for the party's 2020 White House nomination are racing to oppose Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court pick. Democratic Sens. Cory Booker (N.J.), Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.) were among a group of senators who said on Monday night that they would oppose Kavanaugh."Judge Brett Kavanaugh represents a direct and fundamental threat to that promise of equality and so I will oppose his nomination to the Supreme Court.

If Judge Kavanaugh ’s nomination is successful, two of Justice Kennedy’s clerks from a single term will serve together, probably for decades. Judge Kavanaugh ’s first nomination to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit stalled in the Senate, but he was confirmed after

Colorado seen as “safer ground than most states ” on abortion issues. Trump tosses abortion fight into crucial midterm elections. President Donald Trump announced his nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.

Although a complete reversal of Roe remains a longshot, some Democratic elected officials want to enact new abortion protections and repeal dormant laws that criminalize abortion. While those laws have been ignored for decades, some stretching back to the 19th century, Democrats want to erase them so they cannot be revived in the future.

"As long as they are enshrined in statute, they can be picked up and used by people who do not feel the same way about women and their bodies that I would say most people in this state feel," said Massachusetts state Senate President Harriette Chandler, a Democrat.

Chandler is pushing to repeal an abortion ban from the 1800s that has remained unenforced, in part because of a 1981 state court ruling protecting access to abortion.

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Judge Kavanaugh ’s first nomination to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit stalled in the Senate, but he was confirmed after His opinions on abortion rights, religious exemptions and Mr. Obama’s health care law shared a common quality: they were all conservative

The groundswell for Barrett, unusual in a nomination process, was a foretaste of what the rebellions would look like. And it’s one indicator of a larger truth: One way or another, after Brett Kavanaugh , the politics of abortion will never be the same.

The Massachusetts Senate approved the bill unanimously in January. The House speaker, also a Democrat, said that chamber will take it up before the end of the formal legislative session July 31.

In New York, Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been holding rallies after Kavanaugh's nomination this week urging the state Senate to reconvene. He wants it to strengthen the right to an abortion, a seemingly unlikely event in the Republican-led chamber.

Democratic Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state law legalizing abortion, passed three years before the Roe ruling, includes a ban on third-trimester abortions and offers very limited exceptions. The Assembly has passed legislation codifying Roe six consecutive times, but the Senate has repeatedly blocked it.

"There may have once been a time when we felt comfortable with the protections Roe v. Wade offered," Heastie said. "But that time has passed, and now these fundamental rights are threatened like never before. We cannot afford to take this right for granted."

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Judge Kavanaugh ’s first nomination to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit stalled in the Senate, but he was confirmed after His opinions on abortion rights, religious exemptions and Mr. Obama’s health care law shared a common quality: they were all conservative

"I will oppose Judge Kavanaugh 's nomination with everything I have, and I hope a bipartisan majority will do the same," Schumer said in a statement. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., all of whom are running for re-election in states Trump won in 2016.

Seventeen states already have laws that could be used to restrict the legal status of abortions if Roe is overturned or severely limited. Of those, Massachusetts is one of 10 states that still have pre-Roe abortion bans on the books, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a national research group that supports abortion rights.

The institute says nine other states have laws specifically protecting abortion rights.

Lawmakers in some Republican-led states have been attempting for decades to chip away at the Roe ruling by restricting when, where and how abortions can be provided. Kavanaugh's appointment could lead to a surge in such measures.

"The time is right. We need to act on it," said Missouri Rep. Mike Moon, who is hoping Trump's Supreme Court appointment breathes new life into an anti-abortion state constitutional amendment that stalled earlier this year.

The Missouri proposal states that "nothing in this constitution secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion." It mirrors one first adopted by Tennessee voters in 2014 and placed on this November's ballot by Republican-led legislatures in Alabama and West Virginia.

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The groundswell for Barrett, unusual in a nomination process, was a foretaste of what the rebellions would look like. And it’s one indicator of a larger truth: One way or another, after Brett Kavanaugh , the politics of abortion will never be the same.

(CNN) Just minutes after President Donald Trump announced he'd nominate Judge Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court on Monday night, the fight for his confirmation began, a "I will oppose Judge Kavanaugh 's nomination with everything I have, and I hope a bipartisan majority will do the same.

The Tennessee measure was intended to overturn a state Supreme Court determination that the state constitution provided an even greater protection for abortion than the federal one. If the Roe precedent is reversed or weakened, similar constitutional amendments in other states could erect a shield against lawsuits asserting state-based abortion rights.

At the time of the Roe v. Wade decision, just four states — Alaska, Hawaii, New York and Washington — allowed abortion on demand prior to fetal viability. California also broadly interpreted a woman's "mental health" exception to allow many abortions, according to the National Right to Life Committee. Most states had strict bans.

David O'Steen, executive director of the National Right to Life Committee, said the high court's 1973 ruling "bottled up the discussion" and imposed a nationwide policy at a time when there was no public consensus in favor of abortion rights.

"We've had the subsequent 45 years where (the) pro-life movement has been seeking one way or the other to bring this back to the domain of elected representatives, rather than the courts," he said.

If Roe is overturned, O'Steen anticipates that some states would swiftly implement sweeping bans on abortion, some would maintain broad access to the procedure and others would plunge into legislative debate over what types of abortion laws they should have.

Kavanaugh works Capitol Hill, Dems warn of rightward tilt

  Kavanaugh works Capitol Hill, Dems warn of rightward tilt Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh returns to Capitol Hill Wednesday for a round of meetings with key Republican senators as Democrats ramp up their efforts to block his confirmation. Kavanaugh, the conservative appellate court judge President Donald Trump chose to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, is set to meet separately with Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and other senators.Democrats, as the Senate minority, have few options to block Kavanaugh.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh speaks after President Donald Trump announced his nomination in the East would overturn Roe v. Wade and cause abortion to become “illegal in 20 states in 18 months.” We’ll see. Meanwhile, Kavanaugh can brace himself for weeks of pummeling.

President Donald Trump has nominated Brett Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court. Democrats are alarmed that he will overturn rulings about abortion and same-sex marriage. I will oppose Judge Kavanaugh ’s nomination with everything I have, and I hope a bipartisan majority will do the same.

"The idea that a reversal of Roe would end abortion — that's simply not correct," he said.

Assertions that Kavanaugh could sway Supreme Court opinion to allow states to ban abortion are "a lot of hyperbole coming out of the left," Florida Republican Party Chairman Blaise Ingoglia said Wednesday in a media conference call with Republican U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz.

Gaetz said some abortion limitations "could receive more favorable treatment, bringing our country a more pro-life position, but it wouldn't necessarily have to fundamentally alter the holding in Roe."

Florida politics are dominated by Republicans, yet the state also has dozens of clinics that provide abortions.

Earlier this year, before Anthony Kennedy announced he was retiring from the court, Rhode Island Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello called concerns about Roe being overturned "irrelevant" and "not founded in reality." But now, Rhode Island Democratic Rep. Edie Ajello, a longtime abortion rights advocate, said it's important to codify the Roe decision into state law before it is further eroded at the federal level.

Ajello has sponsored unsuccessful legislation that would strike several old state laws. One of those, passed shortly after the Roe decision, imposed prison sentences on those who provide aid or counsel "to procure a miscarriage" unless necessary to save a woman's life.

Ajello said such laws are insulting and demeaning to women.

"For that reason, they ought to be off the books," she said.

___

Lieb reported from Jefferson City, Missouri. Contributing were Associated Press writers David Crary in New York City; David Klepper in Albany, New York; Brendan Farrington in Tallahassee, Florida; and Michelle R. Smith in Providence, Rhode Island.

States brace for abortion fights after Kavanaugh nomination .
Anticipating renewed fights over abortion, some governors and state lawmakers already are looking for ways to enhance or dismantle the right in their own constitutions and laws. President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court has raised both fears and hopes that a conservative court majority could weaken or overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that created a nationwide right to abortion. That could fan an already raging battle in states over what should and should not be legal.

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