Offbeat: Human Rights Watch: Saudis arrest prominent women's rights activists - - PressFrom - US
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Offbeat Human Rights Watch: Saudis arrest prominent women's rights activists

17:15  01 august  2018
17:15  01 august  2018 Source:   msn.com

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Saudi activists say at least four other women ’ s rights defenders have also been arrested since May 15 Saudi activists told Human Rights Watch that the seriousness of the allegations and the In mid-September 2017, Saudi authorities arrested dozens of people, including prominent clerics and

Saudi authorities have arrested two more women ’ s rights activists in recent days in what appears to be an unrelenting crackdown on the women ’ s rights Human Rights Watch has documented Saudi Arabia’s use of its Specialized Criminal Court and counterterrorism law to unjustly prosecute human

Saudi activists Samar Badawi (C) with Hillary Clinton (R), then US Secretary of State, and Michelle Obama in Washington, DC on March 8, 2012: Activist Samar Badawi, shown with Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton in Washington in 2012, was arrested this week. © Provided by AFP Activist Samar Badawi, shown with Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton in Washington in 2012, was arrested this week.

Saudi Arabian authorities have arrested two high-profile women's rights activists, Human Rights Watch said Wednesday, amid what the organization called an "unprecedented" crackdown on dissent.

Award-winning gender rights activist Samar Badawi was arrested along with fellow campaigner Nassima al-Sadah this week, "the latest victims of an unprecedented government crackdown on the women's rights movement," HRW said in a statement.

Their arrests "signal that the Saudi authorities see any peaceful dissent, whether past or present, as a threat to their autocratic rule," said Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch.

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A study at that time by Human Rights Watch said Saudi Arabia’s male guardianship system was the most significant impediment to realizing women ’ s rights in Following the warnings, some women left the country for a period of time and others stopped voicing their opinions on Twitter. Activists say it's

(Beirut) – Saudi Arabia’s public prosecution agency announced on March 1, 2019 that the country’s leading women ’ s rights activists who have been detained following arrests that began in May 2018 would face charges and be put on trial, Human Rights Watch said today. The prosecutors did not

Amal al-Harbi, the wife of jailed civic rights activist Fowzan al-Harbi, was also taken into custody this week, HRW, said while adding that it was unclear why she was targeted.

Saudi authorities did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The arrests come weeks after more than a dozen women's right campaigners were detained and accused of undermining national security and collaborating with enemies of the state. Some have since been released.

Samar Badawi is the recipient of the 2012 International Women of Courage Award, handed out by the U.S. secretary of state.

She is also a vocal campaigner for rights activist Raif Badawi, her brother and Saudi Arabia's top blogger, and Waleed Abu al-Khair, her former husband. Both men are serving lengthy jail terms for charges linked to their activism.

Like Badawi, Sadah is a longtime opponent of Saudi Arabia's guardianship system, under which women require male permission to study, marry or travel.

Saudi Arabia, a major U.S. ally, has introduced a string of reforms over the past year aimed at improving the kingdom's image and oil-dependent economy.

Under the helm of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, heir to the region's most powerful throne, Saudi Arabia in June ended a longstanding ban on women driving and launched a number of projects aimed at attracting tourists.

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