•   
  •   
  •   

Offbeat Thousands in France, California say 'no' to climate change

02:25  09 september  2018
02:25  09 september  2018 Source:   msn.com

Trump to name climate change skeptic as emerging tech adviser

  Trump to name climate change skeptic as emerging tech adviser William Happer, a Princeton atomic physicist and prominent skeptic questioning whether humans are causing rapid climate change, is joining the National Security Council as senior director for emerging technologies, according to NSC officials. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Happer, 79, is an emeritus professor of physics at Princeton who served in the Department of Energy under President George H.W. Bush in the early 1990s. He did not respond to CNN's requests for comment.

14. California 's governor proposed the event after President Donald Trump vowed to pull the U.S. out of a landmark 2015 climate accord. Police estimated that 18,500 took part in the Paris march, while organizers put the number at some 50,000. Several hundred people gathered in France 's southern

Thousands of people gather in front of Paris town hall during a protest, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018. Demonstrators in cities across France and Europe were marching on Saturday as part of a global day of protest ahead of a climate action summit this month in San Francisco, California .

Thousands of people gather in front of Paris town hall during a protest, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018. Demonstrators in cities across France and Europe were marching on Saturday as part of a global day of protest ahead of a climate action summit this month in San Francisco, California. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)© The Associated Press Thousands of people gather in front of Paris town hall during a protest, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018. Demonstrators in cities across France and Europe were marching on Saturday as part of a global day of protest ahead of a climate action summit this month in San Francisco, California. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

PARIS — More than 18,000 people marched Saturday in Paris as part of an international mobilization to show popular support for urgent measures to combat climate change in advance of a San Francisco summit.

Crowds overflowed a plaza in front of City Hall before marching east to the Place de la Republique, carrying an urgent message that it's up to the public to put global warming at the top of the political agenda.

Thousands march in French cities to demand action against climate change

  Thousands march in French cities to demand action against climate change Tens of thousands of people demonstrated in France's main cities on Saturday to demand action against climate change and to show support for former environment minister Nicolas Hulot who quit in frustration over the government's approach.Load Error

PARIS (AP) — Thousands of people have joined a march and rally held in Paris as part of an international mobilization to show popular support for urgent measures to California 's governor proposed the event after President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

In California , these demands were put to Gov. Jerry Brown ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit -- a meeting of public officials and corporate executives from around the world. March organizers urged support for community-led solutions, starting in places most impacted by pollution and climate change .

"Planet in Danger," read some banners.

Activists around the world encouraged "Rise for Climate" protests before the summit taking place Sept.12-Sept. 14. California's governor proposed the event after President Donald Trump vowed to pull the U.S. out of a landmark 2015 climate accord.

The international agreement was negotiated in France, and the French capital's march was more successful than ones held Saturday in other French cities or elsewhere in Europe.

Thousands of people took to the streets of San Francisco, marching about 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) from the city's piers to City Hall. Demonstrators banged drums, sang and hoisted signs that said "Rise for climate justice" and "Not a penny more for dirty energy." They called for politicians to spearhead a transition to 100 percent renewable energy.

Rich Nations Vowed Billions for Climate Change. Poor Countries Are Waiting.

  Rich Nations Vowed Billions for Climate Change. Poor Countries Are Waiting. Some delegates to a climate change conference in Thailand lament the shortfall in a United Nations program meant to help poor countries.HONG KONG — When industrialized nations pledged in 2009 to mobilize $100 billion a year by 2020 to help the poorest countries deal with climate change, it won over some skeptics in the developing world who had argued that industrialized nations should pay up for contributing so much to the problem.

More than 18,000 people marched Saturday in Paris as part of an international mobilization to show popular support for urgent measures to combat climate

Thousands of people gather in front of Paris town hall during a protest. Demonstrators in cities across France and Europe were marching on Saturday as part of a global day of California ’s governor proposed the event after President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

Police estimated that 18,500 took part in the Paris march, while organizers put the number at some 50,000.

Several hundred people gathered in France's southern port city of Marseille. Several dozen called for an end to the use of fossil fuels outside London's Tate Modern art gallery. Only about two dozen showed up in Barcelona, Spain.

The front-page of France's daily Liberation newspaper featured a call from 700 French scientists for the government to "move from incantations to acts to move toward a carbon-free society."

The language was a reference to French President Emmanuel Macron's use of the phrase "Make our planet great again," a takeoff on Trump's "Make America Great Again" campaign slogan.

The signing scientists also called for "strong and clear political choices" and said "solutions are available."

The march in Paris, organized with the theme "Change the system, but don't change the climate," was both festive and serious.

One protester, Manuel Bibes, denounced the plastic that inundates daily life. Another, Rodgrigo de la Vega criticized the practice of driving down the road to buy bread.

"There is no Planet B," a sign read.

___

Elaine Ganley and Chris den Hond in Paris and Christopher Weber in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Trump rolls back pollution rules for drilling on US lands .
The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era rule meant to curb climate-changing pollution caused by huge volumes of natural gas that escapes after being drilled from U.S. lands. The move cancels a 2016 rule adopted under President Barack Obama that forced energy companies to capture methane, a key contributor to climate change. The replacement rule does not have the same mandates for companies to reduce gas pollution.It comes a week after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed weakening a similar rule for emissions from public and private lands.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!