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Offbeat Florence death toll at 15, including 2 from carbon monoxide

21:30  16 september  2018
21:30  16 september  2018 Source:   msn.com

'There is no access to Wilmington' as flooding overwhelms North Carolina

  'There is no access to Wilmington' as flooding overwhelms North Carolina At least 17 people have died in the wreckage of the hurricane-turned-tropical depression that dumped 30 inches of rain in parts of the state.(Pictured) Members of the North Carolina Task Force urban search and rescue team wade through a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who stayed behind as Florence continues to dump heavy rain, on Sept., 16, in Fayetteville, N.C.

The death toll attributed to Florence stands at 15, including 10 in North Carolina and five in South Carolina.

—A driver died Sunday when a pickup truck struck an overpass support beam in Kershaw County, South Carolina, state troopers said.

Storm Tracker: Click Here to Follow Florence's Path

—23-year-old Michael Dalton Prince died Sunday after the truck he was riding in lost control on a flooded two-lane road in Georgetown County, South Carolina, said Coroner Kenny Johnson. The driver and another passenger escaped after the truck landed upside down in a flooded ditch.

One man plans to ride out Hurricane Florence on his boat

  One man plans to ride out Hurricane Florence on his boat A mountain man from North Carolina is planning to remain aboard his 46-foot cabin cruiser as Hurricane Florence strikes near Myrtle Beach.LITTLE RIVER, S.C. – Rolling up some plastic windows on his 46-foot cabin cruiser Wednesday, Masten Cloer admitted he was nervous. A new weather forecast predicted Hurricane Florence changing paths to make a landfall near his marina at the border of North Carolina and South Carolina.

—63-year-old Mark Carter King and 61-year-old Debra Collins Rion of Loris, South Carolina, died of carbon monoxide poisoning from running a generator indoors, authorities said

Slideshow by Photo Services

—A husband and wife died in a Fayetteville, North Carolina, house fire Friday

—A mother and her 8-month-old child were killed when a massive tree crushed their brick house Friday in Wilmington, North Carolina

—An 81-year-old man died while trying to evacuate Wayne County, North Carolina, on Friday

— A 78-year-old man was electrocuted in the rain while trying to connect extension cords for a generator in Lenoir County, North Carolina

a group of people standing on a rock: Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard reinforce a low-lying area with sandbags as Hurricane Florence approaches Lumberton, N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.

Slideshow by USA Today

—A 77-year old man died after he went outside to check on his hunting dogs and was blown down by strong winds

—Three people died in Duplin County, North Carolina, because of flash flooding and swift water on roadways

—61-year-old Amber Dawn Lee died late Friday when the vehicle she was driving struck a tree near the town of Union, South Carolina

Authorities say the storm did not cause some other deaths that occurred during Florence in North Carolina: a woman who died of undetermined causes in a shelter, a woman who suffered a heart attack at home during the storm, and a couple whose apparent murder-suicide was investigated during hurricane conditions in Otway.

Florence moves deeper into North Carolina and the worst may still be to come .
Darkness and danger spread across North Carolina Saturday, as Tropical Storm Florence blasted an ever-widening swath of the state with torrential rain and dangerous wind. Eleven people in North Carolina and one in South Carolina had died from storm-related incidents as of Saturday. The fatalities illustrate the scope of hazards facing people in Florence's broad path: Two were killed by a tree falling on their home, one was electrocuted while connecting extension cords in water and one was blown over by wind while tending his dogs. Another died of a heart attack while emergency workers coming to her aid were blocked by fallen trees.

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