Offbeat: American, Russian alive after Soyuz rocket headed to space station fails on launch - PressFrom - US
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Offbeat American, Russian alive after Soyuz rocket headed to space station fails on launch

15:52  11 october  2018
15:52  11 october  2018 Source:   msn.com

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"MOSCOW —A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the astronaut and

A Russian Soyuz MS-10 rocket was carrying two crew when a booster malfunctioned. Russia halted all crewed space flights, probably extending the time They were quickly located by rescue teams and flown back to the launch site for an emotional reunion with their families. The failure of the Soyuz

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MOSCOW —A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the astronaut and cosmonaut to careen back to Earth in a dramatic emergency landing.

U.S. astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin parachuted to the ground safely in their capsule after a booster on the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft failed, NASA and Russia’s space agency said. They were met by rescue teams in remote Kazakhstan more than 200 miles from their launchpad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

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Russian space launch goes awry. Watch rocket explode seconds after liftoff. SpaceX completes historic rocket launch , sea landing. (CNN) Russia has launched an investigation into the failed launch of a Soyuz rocket ferrying a crew to the International Space Station (ISS) which resulted in

Two astronauts are alive after dramatically aborting their voyage to the International Space Station when their Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned while it MOSCOW —A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the

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Manned space launches have been suspended pending an investigation.

It was the first time that the Soyuz — the main workhorse of manned space flight today — had failed on a launch to the 20-year-old International Space Station. The spacecraft has been the sole means of bringing humans to the space station since the end of the U.S. Space Shuttle program, but commercial providers aiming for manned spaceflight are increasingly nipping at Russia’s heels.

“Shortly after launch, there was an anomaly with the booster and the launch ascent was aborted,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a statement. “Hague and Ovchinin are out of the capsule and are reported to be in good condition.”

No more taxi service to Space Station after Soyuz failure

  No more taxi service to Space Station after Soyuz failure The taxi service to the orbiting International Space Station is taking no passengers until further notice. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to send astronauts to the ISS until investigators determine why a Soyuz rocket failed after blast-off Thursday, complicating an already tricky launch calendar for 2019. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The only way to get astronauts from Earth to the ISS since 2011 has been aboard Russian Soyuz rockets.

The Soyuz craft experienced a problem minutes after liftoff, en route to the International Space Station , but the capsule landed safely. A rocket launched from Kazakhstan failed several minutes after liftoff. Both astronauts on board returned to earth safely.

A Russian cosmonaut and a U.S. astronaut were safe on Thursday after a Soyuz rocket bound for the International Space Station failed in mid-air two minutes after The mishap occurred as the first and second stages of a Russian booster rocket separated shortly after the launch from Kazakhstan’s

Dmitry Peskov, the Kremlin’s spokesman, put it more bluntly in his daily conference call with journalists: “Thank God everyone is alive.”

Slideshow by photo services

New Russian space station flight planned for spring - space agency

  New Russian space station flight planned for spring - space agency The head of Russia's space agency said on Friday that two astronauts who survived the mid-air failure of a Russian rocket would fly again and would provisionally travel to the International Space Station (ISS) in spring of next year. Dmitry Rogozin, the head of Russian space agency Roscosmos, was speaking a day after Russian cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and American Nick Hague made a dramatic emergency landing in Kazakhstan after the failure of the Soyuz rocket carrying them to the orbital ISS.Rogozin on Friday posted a picture on Twitter of himself sat next to the two astronauts and said they had now arrived in Moscow.

Editor's note: A Soyuz rocket suffered an anomaly on Oct. 11, 2018, shortly after launching the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin toward the International Space Station .

The Soyuz -FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-10 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station , ISS, flies in The two astronauts are making an emergency landing after a Russian booster rocket carrying them into orbit to the International Space Station has failed after launch .

After the booster failed, Ovchinin and Hague were forced to make a ballistic descent, coming back to the ground at a sharper angle than normal and causing higher gravitational forces on their bodies. But soon after the landing, U.S. and Russian officials said that rescue forces were in contact with the astronaut and cosmonaut.

After their rescue, Hague and Ovchinin were set to be airlifted to a space flight training center outside of Moscow.

Russian space chief Dmitry Rogozin said he was forming a state commission to investigate what caused the failure.

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yury Borisov, who oversees space flight, promised to share all information from the investigation with the United States and said that manned space launches would be suspended until the end of the probe, according to Russian news agencies.

The rare failed launch of the Soyuz rocket is the latest and most grave problem to beset U.S.-Russian cooperation in space. Last month, an oxygen leak was found in the International Space Station that Rogozin said was caused deliberately. Its cause still hasn’t been determined. Russian officials have also insisted on a bigger role in a U.S.-led plan to build a space station orbiting the moon.

NASA says will use Russia's Soyuz rocket again despite accident

  NASA says will use Russia's Soyuz rocket again despite accident NASA chief Jim Bridenstine on Friday praised the Russian space programme and said he expected a new crew to go to the International Space Station in December despite a rocket failure. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "I fully anticipate that we will fly again on a Soyuz rocket and I have no reason to believe at this point that it will not be on schedule," he told reporters in Moscow.

A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the astronaut and U.S. astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin parachuted to the ground safely in their capsule after a booster on the Soyuz MS-10

A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying a new U.S.- Russian crew to the International Space Station failed during its ascent Thursday (Oct. "Confirming again that the today's Soyuz MS10 launch did go into a ballistic re-entry mode a little bit after its launch ," Dean said during live television commentary.

Nevertheless, officials in both countries continue to refer to space flight as a rare example of U.S.-Russian cooperation continuing despite geopolitical tensions.

“I strongly believe we’re going to get the right answer to what caused the hole on the International Space Station and that together we’ll be able to continue our strong collaboration,” Bridenstine said on a visit to Moscow this week, according to the Associated Press. “What we’ve got to do is we’ve got to very dispassionately allow the investigation to go forward without speculation, without rumor, without innuendo, without conspiracy.”

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The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-10 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018.© Dmitri Lovetsky/AP The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-10 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018.

No time to be nervous: cosmonaut shrugs off emergency landing.
Russian cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin shrugged off on Tuesday his emergency landing last week, saying there had been no time to worry as his capsule plunged back to earth. Ovchinin and American astronaut Nick Hague had to abort their mission on Oct. 11 after the Soyuz rocket supposed to carry them to the International Space Station failed. In an interview with Rossiya-24 television, Ovchinin described the huge G-forces the crew experienced. "Imagine if a reinforced concrete block seven times your weight was placed on your chest," he said.

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