Opinion: Voters May Be Wising Up - - PressFrom - US
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Opinion Voters May Be Wising Up

19:29  19 march  2018
19:29  19 march  2018 Source:   nytimes.com

Special election: How to look at returns from the Pennsylvania House race

  Special election: How to look at returns from the Pennsylvania House race The Pennsylvania 18th special congressional election between Democrat Conor Lamb and Republican Rick Saccone is finally here! Load Error The good news for poll watchers, no matter your party affiliation, is it shouldn't be too late a night if the returns come in at the same rate they have in prior years. We should have a clear idea of who has won the race by 11 p.m. ET.But when polls close at 8 p.m.

There’s no mystery about the Republican agenda. For at least the past 40 years, the G.O.P.’s central policy goal has been upward redistribution of income: lower taxes for the wealthy, big cuts in programs that help the poor and the middle class.

But if special elections in the Trump era are any indication, voters are wising up . Rick Saccone, the Republican candidate in a deep-red Pennsylvania congressional district that Mr. Trump won by almost 20 points, tried not one, not two, but three different bait-and-switch strategies. And on Tuesday he still

a sign in front of a brick building: A voter’s politics were on display in Waynesburg, Pa. © Maranie Staab/Reuters A voter’s politics were on display in Waynesburg, Pa.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

There’s no mystery about the Republican agenda. For at least the past 40 years, the G.O.P.’s central policy goal has been upward redistribution of income: lower taxes for the wealthy, big cuts in programs that help the poor and the middle class. We’ve seen that agenda at work in the policies of every Republican president from Reagan to Trump, every budget proposal from party stars like Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House.

No mandatory recount for Pennsylvania special election

  No mandatory recount for Pennsylvania special election A recount is not mandatory in Tuesday's special election for Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District, according to Pennsylvania Secretary of State spokesperson Wanda Murren. Despite the tight vote count, Murren said there was no recount requirement for this election because it's a district race, not statewide. Early Wednesday morning, there was still no clear-cut winner, as the vote margin remained neck and neck between Republican Rick Saccone and Democrat Conor Lamb with all votes counted except absentee ballots. However, Murren noted that petitions for a recount are allowed.

Wise up , voters - latimes - articles.latimes.com. Others, such as professors Benjamin Page and Robert Shapiro, argue that although each voter may not possess considered views, the mistakes cancel each other out when all views are added up , producing a coherent overall picture.

The voters may wise up soon. They already calling for a stop to development in the East, South and North Bay. Sunnyvale emergency responders are sending warnings. Wiener barely won the election and is acting like he had a mandate. Local authorities are giving voters a chance to decide.

This policy agenda is, however, deeply unpopular. Only small minorities of voters favor tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations; even smaller minorities favor cuts in major social programs. So how does the G.O.P. stay politically competitive? The answer is that the party has mastered the tactics of bait and switch: pretending to stand for one thing, then doing something quite different in office.

But if special elections in the Trump era are any indication, voters are wising up. Rick Saccone, the Republican candidate in a deep-red Pennsylvania congressional district that Trump won by almost 20 points, tried not one, not two, but three different bait-and-switch strategies. And on Tuesday he still seems to have suffered a hair-thin defeat.

U.S. hits Russians with sanctions for election meddling, cyber attacks

  U.S. hits Russians with sanctions for election meddling, cyber attacks The United State announced sanctions on Thursday against 19 Russian individuals and five groups."The administration is confronting and countering malign Russian cyber activity, including their attempted interference in U.S. elections, destructive cyber-attacks, and intrusions targeting critical infrastructure," Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said in a statement.

The Pennsylvania special election vote suggests Republican bait and switch doesn’t work like it used to. Mark Thoma 545d ago. Voters May Be Wising Up - Paul Krugman.

When Mr. Trump’s voters finally get hit, then they may finally abandon him. (His support among key groups such as suburban men and white, non-college educated men dropped significantly.) We’d like to think all Americans care about one another, want to point to the president as a role model for their

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At first, Republicans tried to sell their candidate by touting the 2017 tax cuts, which they portrayed as a boon to the middle class. This was classic Bush-era strategy: The Trump tax cuts, like the Bush tax cuts, did indeed offer some temporary relief to middle-class families, although they offered far more to the wealthy.

What makes this a bait and switch is the hard truth that tax cuts must, eventually, be paid for — in fact, people like Ryan barely waited for the ink on the tax bill to dry before proclaiming that social programs must be cut to reduce the budget deficit the tax cuts will do so much to inflate. And under any plausible allocation of the spending cuts needed to offset lost revenue, the tax cuts will leave most Americans worse off (while, of course, benefiting the top 1 percent).

The thing is, voters seem to have realized this. Republican groups pretty much stopped running ads about the tax cuts weeks before the election, apparently concluding that they weren’t gaining much traction. And election night polling suggests that health care — specifically, opposition to G.O.P. efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act — was a key issue in PA-18.

White House rips Clinton for remarks on Trump voters

  White House rips Clinton for remarks on Trump voters The White House on Thursday lashed out at former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, who has been under fire for disparaging remarks she made this week about President Trump's voters."I think that is a perfect example of why Hillary Clinton is not in the White House," press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said during a press briefing. "She is completely disconnected fro m the American public and certainly I think shows her disdain for the millions and millions of Americans who came out and voted for President Trump and still support him today.

"Indeed, many traditional Alliance voters have in the past voted for her." 'Small pool' of voters . There have been fake Alliance Party leaflets, rogue posters have been put up and Mr Easton has She may not on the ballot paper, but her former supporters will have a big say on who becomes North

1. Voters having NO MEMORY of countless broken promises for decades, not just four years ago. 2. Voters remain ignorant of active socialist engineering Some great deal that is . Do not feel sorry for thousands of Americans that bought into this lie. It is their job to do basic research BEFORE signing up .

If tax cuts won’t sell, how about tariffs? In 2016 Trump portrayed himself as a different kind of Republican, an economic populist who would stand up for the little guy. In practice, he has been utterly orthodox except for one thing, his willingness to break with free trade. And it’s possible that he announced steel tariffs partly in an effort to swing a district in what used to be steel country. Or he may have been trying to steal Stormy Daniels’s thunder. With Trump, you never know.

Anyway, it didn’t work, perhaps because many Pennsylvania voters realize that steel country isn’t what it used to be, and the old days aren’t coming back. These days there are about 10 times as many hospital workers as steel workers in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area — and surely at least some voters realize that G.O.P. efforts to slash health care threaten their jobs as well as their coverage.

Finally, Republicans pulled out their old standby: trying to distract voters from their economic agenda by appealing to racial, cultural and religious enmity. That’s what Ed Gillespie tried in the Virginia gubernatorial race, and in this latest campaign Saccone proclaimed that Democrats are motivated by “hatred for our country” and “hatred of God.” But it didn’t work either time.

GOP asks voters for Pa. voting irregularities ahead of potential challenge

  GOP asks voters for Pa. voting irregularities ahead of potential challenge House Republicans' campaign arm is reaching out to Republicans who may have faced problems at their polling locations during Tuesday's Pittsburgh-area special election as they gather information for a potential recount. Democrat Conor Lamb has 627 more votes than Republican state Rep. Rick Saccone as of the latest tally after the Tuesday election in the 18th District, with just a few hundred provisional and military votes left to be counted.But Republicans are preparing for a potential recount or lawsuit challenging those results.

Good also to see The Florida Project acknowledged, with Willem Dafoe up for Best Supporting Actor, and for Get Out to get in across the board. It isn’t a perfect film (it has a cop-out ending when it might have plumped instead for a horrifying one) but it is a provocative and popular inclusion among the

1. Fully 65 percent of voters say that funding for the state’s public schools remains too low — a statistic which most significantly cuts across demographic lines And not only that, but in what I thought at first might be a typo, according to the survey, 71 percent of Mississippians say they would now favor early

Why not? One answer may be that despite the eruptions of racism and anti-Semitism under Trump, America is on the whole a far more tolerant country than it used to be.

But there are also Trump-specific issues. It’s hard for Republicans to pose as the party of patriotism while slavishly defending a man who holds office in part thanks to Russian intervention, and seems almost eager to demonstrate that he really is Vladimir Putin’s puppet.

And despite receiving overwhelming support from white evangelicals — which tells you something about the state of conservative Christianity — Trump is surely the least godly man ever to occupy the White House.

So the upset in Pennsylvania wasn’t just a harbinger of likely Democratic gains to come. It also showed the bankruptcy of all the political strategies Republicans have used to distract voters from an unpopular agenda.

Yet I have to admit that while the wising-up of American voters is deeply encouraging, it also makes me nervous. History says that Republicans won’t change course, because they never do. They’ll just look for bigger distractions.

And with everyone who showed even an occasional sense of responsibility leaving the Trump administration, you have to wonder what comes next. In particular, regimes in trouble — like, say, the Argentine junta in the 1980s — often try to rally the public with dangerous foreign policy adventurism. Are you sure that Trump won’t go that route? Really sure?

Follow me on Twitter (@PaulKrugman) and Facebook.

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CNN poll: Democrats' edge dips to 6 points in midterm race for control of Congress .
The Democratic advantage on the generic congressional ballot has tightened to 6 percentage points, a new CNN poll conducted by SSRS finds The poll finds that 50% of registered voters say they prefer a Democrat in their congressional district, while 44% say they want a Republican. That's a major shift in favor of the GOP since February, when Democrats held a 16-point edge. It's much closer to January, when their lead was just 5 points. But Democratic voters are much more enthusiastic about casting ballots in November's midterm elections.

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This is interesting!