Opinion: MThere is nothing wrong with a census question about citizenship - - PressFrom - US
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Opinion MThere is nothing wrong with a census question about citizenship

18:47  30 march  2018
18:47  30 march  2018 Source:   foxnews.com

Citizenship question to return to 2020 census, Commerce Department announces

  Citizenship question to return to 2020 census, Commerce Department announces The Trump administration announced Monday night that the 2020 Census will ask respondents if they are citizens of the United States. In a statement, the Commerce Department said the citizenship question would be added in response to a request by the Justice Department made in December. The statement said that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross "has determined that reinstatement of a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census questionnaire is necessary to provide complete and accurate census block level data.

No, it's not. There is nothing wrong with asking about citizenship . Canada asks a citizenship question on its census . So do Australia and many Democrats are worried that adding a citizenship question will dampen participation in the census by illegal immigrants, reducing the total population

No, it’s not. There is nothing wrong with asking about citizenship . Canada asks a citizenship question on its census . So do Australia and many Democrats are worried that adding a citizenship question will dampen participation in the census by illegal immigrants, reducing the total population

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WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration is being sued over its plans to include a question about citizenship in the 2020 Census, which California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D) says "is not just a bad idea - it is illegal."

No, it's not. There is nothing wrong with asking about citizenship. Canada asks a citizenship question on its census. So do Australia and many other U.S. allies. The U.S. government asked about citizenship for 130 years - from 1820 to 1950 - as part of the decennial "short form" census and continued to do so in the "long form" survey - distributed to 1 in 6 people - through 2000, when the long form was replaced by the annual American Community Survey. The ACS goes to about 2.6 percent of the population each year and asks about citizenship to this day.

California AG to sue Trump administration over census citizenship question

  California AG to sue Trump administration over census citizenship question California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said late Monday he is filing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over its decision to include a question on citizenship in the 2020 Census. "We're prepared to do what we must to protect California from a deficient Census. Including a citizenship question on the 2020 census is not just a bad idea - it is illegal," Becerra said in a statement.#BREAKING: Filing suit against @realdonaldtrump's Administration over decision to add #citizenship question on #2020Census. Including the question is not just a bad idea - it is illegal: https://t.

There is nothing wrong with asking about citizenship . Canada asks a citizenship question on its census . But there is no evidence that a citizenship question would dramatically impact census participation. The census is not like a telemarketing survey where people have the option of adding

But there is no evidence that a citizenship question would dramatically impact census participation. The census is not like a telemarketing survey where people have the option of adding their names to a “do not call” list. Everyone is required by law to respond.

So why are many on the left up in arms over a question that should be relatively uncontroversial? Answer: Money and power. Democrats are worried that adding a citizenship question will dampen participation in the census by illegal immigrants, reducing the total population count in the Democratic-leaning metropolitan areas where illegal immigrants are largely concentrated. Because census data is used to determine the distribution of federal funds, that could decrease the cities' share of more than $675 billion a year in federal funding. And because census data is also used to create and apportion congressional seats, Democrats fear that if illegal immigrants don't participate it could shift power from Democratic cities to rural communities, which tend to vote Republican.

New York state will sue to block Census citizenship question

  New York state will sue to block Census citizenship question New York state's attorney general said on Tuesday he will lead a multistate lawsuit to try to stop the federal government from asking people whether they are citizens in the 2020 Census, arguing the move will discourage immigrants from participating. The U.S. Commerce Department, which runs the Census Bureau, announced on Monday that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross had decided to include the citizenship question after a Justice Department request based on a desire for better enforcement of the Voting Rights Act. The act protects minorities' voting rights.

There is nothing wrong with asking about citizenship . Canada asks a citizenship question on its census . So do Australia and many other U.S. allies. Moreover, if asking about citizenship is a deterrent to participation by illegal immigrants, then what about the existing census question that

Ever notice how we so often ask the wrong question ? Which usually leads to the wrong and/or the irrelevant answer. Sometimes I think our public We’re currently roiled by the question of whether or not the 2020 census form should ask if the person filling out the form is a citizen of the United States.

At least, that's Democrats' theory. But there is no evidence that a citizenship question would dramatically impact census participation. The census is not like a telemarketing survey where people have the option of adding their names to a "do not call" list. Everyone is required by law to respond. If a household does not fill out the census form, then census workers visit that household to gather census data. If they still cannot get a household to cooperate, nonrespondents can be fined or prosecuted - though in practice they rarely are. Usually, the Census Bureau instead asks neighbors about the household in order to get as much accurate information as possible. This may add costs to the census, but it is not likely to produce inaccurate data.

Moreover, if asking about citizenship is a deterrent to participation by illegal immigrants, then what about the existing census question that asks whether respondents are "of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin" - the only ethnic group specifically called out. Respondents are required by law to tell the government whether they are of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban or other Hispanic origin, which they are required to list ("print origin, for example, Argentinean, Colombian, Dominican, Nicaraguan, Salvadoran, Spaniard, and so on"). If that does not deter the participation of many illegal immigrants, how would a question on citizenship?

That citizenship question on the 2020 census? Kobach says he pitched it to Trump

  That citizenship question on the 2020 census? Kobach says he pitched it to Trump Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach encouraged President Donald Trump to add a question about citizenship status to the U.S. census during the early weeks of Trump's presidency. More than a year later, Trump's administration has moved to enact that exact policy for the 2020 census.

In these times it is a question that would make too many people afraid to cooperate with the Census , fearing the Census would be used a to track down people whose lives w I do not think there should be a citizenship question on the 2010 US Census .

Citizenship question to be put back on the 2020 Census for first time in 70 years. The Commerce Department is reinstating a citizenship question to the 2020 Census for the first time in decades, a move that some arguewill He said asking about citizenship has nothing to do with voting rights.

There is no good reason not to answer the census, whether one is here legally or illegally. As the Census Bureau points out, "It is against the law for any Census Bureau employee to disclose or publish any census or survey information that identifies an individual or business .?.?. the FBI and other government entities do not have the legal right to access this information." Furthermore, the proposed question is about citizenship, not legal status. This question should not be a deterrent to participation for anyone.

But let's say for the sake of argument that some illegal immigrants do decide not to participate in the 2020 Census. So what? Illegal immigrants are here illegally. If they choose to violate U.S. law yet again by refusing to participate in the census because of a perfectly legitimate question about citizenship, that's not the U.S. government's fault.

This is a losing issue for Democrats. They are effectively arguing that sanctuary cities should be rewarded with more federal money for interfering with the federal enforcement of our immigration laws and turning themselves into magnets for illegal immigrants. And Democrats, who claim to be deeply concerned about foreign interference in our democracy, seem to have no problem with foreign interference when it comes to noncitizens in the United States illegally affecting the distribution of seats in Congress. If Democrats want to make that argument to the American people, go for it. It will further alienate millions of voters who abandoned the Democratic Party in the 2016 election.

States, cities sue U.S. to block 2020 census citizenship question .
A group of U.S. states and cities on Tuesday filed a lawsuit to block the Trump administration from asking people filling out 2020 census forms whether they are citizens. The lawsuit, filed by 17 states, Washington D.C. and six cities, challenged what it said was an "unconstitutional and arbitrary" decision announced last month by the U.S. Department of Commerce, which oversees the Census Bureau, to add the citizenship question.The census, authorized by the U.S. Constitution and conducted every 10 years, is used to determine the allocation to states of seats in the U.S.

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This is interesting!