•   
  •   
  •   

Opinion Trump's deference to Putin is less about collusion than character

17:57  18 july  2018
17:57  18 july  2018 Source:   msn.com

Analysis: Trump’s news conference with Putin was everything Putin could have dreamed

  Analysis: Trump’s news conference with Putin was everything Putin could have dreamed Trump handed Putin the propaganda win we all suspected might be coming, siding with Russia over his own government repeatedly.Supporters of President Trump cheer as the motorcade passes by in Helsinki, Finland on July 15, ahead of his meeting with his Russian counterpart.

Monday, we literally saw President Trump on an international stage, in Helsinki, and he seemed hell-bent on proving me right. During a joint news appearance with Russian President Vladimir Putin , Trump demonstrated that , when put to the test, he cannot see any issue through a prism other than

When President Trump had the chance to confront Russian President Vladimir Putin publicly, he backed down. He backtracked Tuesday, but when it mattered, at a high-profile Whether there was collusion is still an open question, even if many Trump supporters have made up their minds about it.

MOSCOW, RUSSIA - JULY 18: (RUSSIA OUT) Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during the Moscow Urban Forum 2018 on July 18, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has visited a forum in Central Moscow together with Kremlin-backed Moscow's Mayor Sergei Sobyanin who is expected to be re-elected.  (Photo by Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images) © Getty MOSCOW, RUSSIA - JULY 18: (RUSSIA OUT) Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during the Moscow Urban Forum 2018 on July 18, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has visited a forum in Central Moscow together with Kremlin-backed Moscow's Mayor Sergei Sobyanin who is expected to be re-elected. (Photo by Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Last week, I wrote that the best way to think about a Trump Doctrine is as nothing more than Trumpism on the international stage. By Trumpism, I do not mean a coherent ideological program, but a psychological phenomenon, or simply the manifestation of his character.

Trump’s Meeting With Putin Was A Major Missed Opportunity For American Interests

  Trump’s Meeting With Putin Was A Major Missed Opportunity For American Interests Today the president let Vladimir Putin save too much face, which could delay improvement in U.S.-Russia relations. What Putin Wants from the United StatesPutin is not interested only in the removal of sanctions and an end to U.S. strikes against his allies. He certainly wants that. But above all Putin wants to stay in power. It is a matter of survival for him. Unlike Western leaders, who win and hold power by elections, Putin holds and wields power by appearing strong and in charge.

A less innocent explanation among aides is that Trump is simply envious of Putin 's power and that his admiration for him is genuine. In this sense, Trump ' s deference to Putin is not an outlier but part of a pattern, consistent with the admiration he has shown for other despots, from North Korea's Kim

America' s image around the world has plummeted in the wake of its coronavirus response, according to a new Pew survey, which found that a number of countries view President Trump as less trustworthy than Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping.

Monday, we literally saw President Trump on an international stage, in Helsinki, and he seemed hell-bent on proving me right.

During a joint news appearance with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump demonstrated that, when put to the test, he cannot see any issue through a prism other than his grievances and ego.

In a performance that should elicit some resignations from his administration, the president sided with Russia over America's national security community, including Dan Coats, the Trump-appointed director of national intelligence.

Days ago, Coats issued a blistering warning that not only had Russia meddled in our election -- undisputed by almost everyone save the president himself -- but that it is preparing to do so again. But when asked about Russian interference in Helsinki, Trump replied, "All I can do is ask the question. My people came to me, Dan Coats came to me and some others. They said they think it's Russia. I have President Putin. He just said it's not Russia. I will say this. I don't see any reason why it would be [Russia]. ... I have confidence in both parties."

The facts missing from Trump and Putin’s news conference

  The facts missing from Trump and Putin’s news conference The two presidents omitted key facts while answering questions about Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election.Trump was asked whether he believed the U.S. intelligence community’s assessment that Russia interfered in the presidential election in 2016, or whether he believed Putin’s denials. Remarkably, Trump said he had “confidence in both parties.

US President Donald Trump has defended Vladimir Putin when questioned over allegations of murders carried out by the Russian state. He added: "I say it' s better to get along with Russia than not. And if Russia helps us in the fight against Isis [so-called Islamic State], which is a major fight, and Islamic

Trump ’ s “America First” stance has manifested as a neo-mercantilist and semi-isolationist strategy that views many of America’s economic, military and political commitments around the world as opportunities to be exploited for short-term gain. He seems happy to cede U.S. influence in the Middle

Separately, when asked about the frosty relations between the two countries, Trump said, "I hold both countries responsible. ... I think we're all to blame. ... I do feel that we have both made some mistakes."

Amid these and other appalling statements, Trump made it clear that he can only understand the investigation into Russian interference as an attempt to rob him of credit for his electoral victory, and thus to delegitimize his presidency.

For most people with a grasp of the facts -- supporters and critics alike -- the question of Russian interference and the question of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign are separate. Russia did interfere in the election, full stop. Whether there was collusion is still an open question, even if many Trump supporters have made up their minds about it. Whether Russian interference, or collusion, got Trump over the finish line is ultimately unknowable, though I think it's very unlikely.

Trump Feels GOP Heat on Putin, But Will It Linger?

  Trump Feels GOP Heat on Putin, But Will It Linger? With sharp statements that underscored a deep disconnect between the president and his party's orthodoxy in dealing with Russia, GOP lawmakers condemned Donald Trump's apparent appeasement of Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on Monday.With sharp statements that underscored a deep disconnect between the president and his party's orthodoxy in dealing with Russia, GOP lawmakers condemned Donald Trump's apparent appeasement of Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on Monday.

A non-dogmatic Trump takes a wider view of situations, and is less limited in his options. For that reason alone, Putin or any other US rival, might prefer collusion against Bernie Sanders during the Democratic primary to the point that it was clear that they were actively working against Sanders and

Putin described the claims of collusion between Trump and Russia as “sheer nonsense aimed at a domestic audience and used for domestic political infighting in the United States”. He also said political tensions in the US had not abated since Mueller finished his investigation and Trump ’ s foes were

But for Trump these distinctions are meaningless. Even when his own Department of Justice indicts 12 Russian intelligence agents, the salient issue for Trump in Helsinki is that "they admit these are not people involved in the campaign." All you need to know is: We ran a brilliant campaign, and that's why I'm president.

The great parlor game in Washington (and beyond) is to theorize why Trump is so incapable of speaking ill of Putin and so determined to make apologies for Russia.

Among the self-styled "resistance," the answer takes several sometimes overlapping, sometimes contradictory forms. One theory is that the Russians have "kompromat" -- that is, embarrassing or incriminating intelligence on Trump. Another is that he is a willing asset of the Russians -- "Agent Orange" -- with whom he colluded to win the presidency.

These theories can't be wholly dismissed, even if some overheated versions get way ahead of the available facts. But their real shortcoming is that they are less plausible than the Aesopian explanation: This is who Trump is. Even if Russia hadn't meddled in the election at all, Trump would still admire Putin because Trump admires men like Putin -- which is why he's praised numerous other dictators and strongmen.

The president's steadfast commitment to a number of policies -- animosity toward NATO, infatuation with protectionism, an Obama-esque obsession with eliminating nuclear weapons, and his determination that a "good relationship" with Russia should be a policy goal rather than a means to one -- may have some ideological underpinning. (These policies all seem to be rooted in intellectual fads of the 1980s.)

But Trump's stubborn refusal to listen to his own advisers in the matter of the Russia investigation likely stems from his inability to admit that his instincts are ever wrong. As always, Trump's character trumps all.

(Jonah Goldberg's new book, "Suicide of the West," is now available wherever books are sold. You can write to him by e-mail at goldbergcolumn@gmail.com, or via Twitter @JonahNRO.)

Trump's Two Hours Alone With Putin Still Rattling Washington .
President Donald Trump’s one-on-one meeting with Russian leader Vladimir Putin continues to unsettle lawmakers and foreign policy experts, who also gave the thumbs-down to a possible follow-up meeting at the White House. “We need to know everything, and the president’s national security team needs to know everything” about the leaders’ two-hour meeting in Helsinki on July 16, Susan Rice, national security adviser to President Barack Obama, said on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.Rice said it was an “historic mistake” to allow Trump -- or any U.S. president -- to sit down with Putin without note-takers or aides present in the room.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!