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OpinionNeeded in the Russia investigation: More skepticism of Manafort and the media

21:15  11 january  2019
21:15  11 january  2019 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Judge accepts Manafort's resignation as Connecticut lawyer

Judge accepts Manafort's resignation as Connecticut lawyer A Connecticut judge has accepted former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort's proposal to permanently give up his right to practice law in the state.

Paul Manafort was convicted of eight bank and tax fraud charges on Aug. 21 after four days of deliberations, becoming the first campaign associate of President Trump found Read on for a look at Manafort 's work with the Trump campaign and how he is connected to the Russia investigation .

How Trump and Manafort Are Helping Each Other in the Russia Investigation . Trump’s and Manafort ’s lawyers can share as much or as little as they’d like under the agreement, which can be “As we’ve seen from Trump’s past pardons, Manafort won’t need to wait on career prosecutors or the

Needed in the Russia investigation: More skepticism of Manafort and the media© (Alex Brandon/AP) Paul Manafort departs Federal District Court for a hearing, Thursday, April 19, 2018, in Washington.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

The Russia-collusion story manages to be at once frenetic and humdrum. Apparent bombshell revelations arise but without advancing the public's knowledge beyond a couple of truths we all knew back in 2016: First, when it comes to President Trump, the media can’t control itself. Second, Paul Manafort is no friend.

In perhaps the 1,000th “ bombshell” report on the Russia investigation, the New York Times reported earlier this week that Manafort, as Trump’s campaign chairman, had sent internal polling data to Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska, who is “close to the Kremlin.”

Mystery shrouds Manafort case as attorneys appear to miss key deadline

Mystery shrouds Manafort case as attorneys appear to miss key deadline Attorneys for Paul Manafort appear to have missed a court-ordered deadline to reply to Robert Mueller's accusations that Manafort lied to federal prosecutors.

The Russian identified in court records as a Ministry of Foreign Affairs Connection sent an email to Papadopoulos and the Professor, saying: “I have just The Professor said: “We will continue to liaise through you with the Russian counterparts in terms of what is needed for a high level meeting of Mr

Mr. Manafort is also facing investigations by state and local authorities in New York. Here are some of the key points in the indictment , or you can The charges are a significant escalation in the Russia inquiry. The special counsel leading the investigation , Robert S. Mueller III, was assigned in May to

This revelation perturbed us. Seeing how close Manafort and Michael Flynn were to both Russia and Trump, we have kept an open mind about the investigation into collusion. We don’t know all the facts, and so we try to process all new information on its merits.

Yet while many media outlets — see Esquire, Talking Points Memo, and others — took the Times report as conclusive proof of collusion, we held our fire. Why? Because while we have tried to keep cool about this investigation, the largest media outlets have not. We recall ABC reporting that Flynn met with the Kremlin during the campaign. That was a “bombshell” of the first order. Except that it turned out to be false.

And so it was with the latest Times report. Manafort was sending the polling data to Ukranians, it turns out, not to Russians as the Times claimed.

Manafort claimed to be placing people in Trump administration: filing

Manafort claimed to be placing people in Trump administration: filing Manafort claimed to be placing people in Trump administration: filing

Trump, Jr. tweeted from his Twitter accounts, saying " Media & Dems are extremely invested in the Russia story. The final meeting overlapped with Manafort 's joining the Trump campaign and Russian Intelligence's hacking of the Democratic National Committee's emails.

Documents also state that Gates had admitted knowing the associate was a former officer with Russian military intelligence.

This incident confirmed both of our general operating assumptions on the Russia investigation: Don’t fall for the media “bombshells,” and never count Manafort as a friend.

Manafort went to work for the Trump campaign in the spring of 2016. Trump wasn’t paying Manafort, which should have been a clear warning sign. Manafort was free to Trump for the same reason Facebook is free to you: You are not the customer; you’re the product. Manafort was working for Ukrainian oligarchs and other shady foreign clients, and part of the value he was delivering was proximity to the Republican presidential nominee and the information, such as internal polling, that proximity allowed him.

We have repeatedly warned Trump about this. “Manafort is not your friend,” we wrote in an editorial addressed to the president. “Manafort is a shady foreign agent who tried to exploit you. And if he had never been involved in the Trump campaign, there may not be a Russia investigation at all.”

There’s some worry that Trump has considered pardoning Manafort. At the very least, we’ve seen Trump praise Manafort. This praise is unwarranted.

Trump should turn his back on this double-dealer who has caused him so much trouble. And we all should show more skepticism of the media “bombshells” that have caused commentators and other reporters so much trouble.

Mnuchin meets with Senate GOP to shore up ranks on Russia sanctions vote.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin met with Senate Republicans on Tuesday ahead of a key vote on Russia sanctions to prevent GOP defections on a Democratic-sponsored resolution that could embarrass President Trump. Senate Republican Whip John Thune (S.D.) said ahead of Mnuchin's lunchtime briefing that it would factor heavily into GOP colleagues' votes on a resolution disapproving of the Treasury Department's proposals to relax sanctions on a Russian oligarch, Oleg Deripaska, connected to Russian intelligence and organized crime.

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