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OpinionCongress hates Trump's tariffs, yet sits by idly instead of acting

20:16  20 may  2019
20:16  20 may  2019 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

AP FACT CHECK: Trump sugar-coats a trade war with China

AP FACT CHECK: Trump sugar-coats a trade war with China President Donald Trump let loose with a morning round of tweets that sugar-coat the consequences of his trade war with China. Trump minimized the worth of China's purchases of U.S. goods and services, which support nearly 1 million jobs in the U.S., misstated the trade deficit and ignored the inevitable rise in many costs to consumers when imports are heavily taxed. This, as his tariffs kicked in Friday on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, with another round of tariffs in the offing, and as U.S. and Chinese officials negotiated in Washington.

Yet Article I of the Constitution empowers Congress to legislate in all areas related to tariffs , regardless of what the Trade Security Act covers. To check the president, Congress must instead require all presidential decisions to adjust tariffs under Section 232 to be approved by Congress

President Trump will enact steel and aluminum tariffs by the end of the week, the White House says. The Trump administration is using a law not The law – specifically, Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 – allows the president to bypass Congress and impose tariffs by executive

Congress hates Trump's tariffs, yet sits by idly instead of acting© Provided by MediaDC: Washington Newspaper Publishing Company, Inc.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

There are numerous ways for Congress to check the president. In recent years, its members have frequently opted to pass so-called resolutions of disapproval to reverse administrative actions after they have been taken. An example of this is the process that Congress established in the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 112-25) to reverse prospective decisions by the president to raise the debt ceiling.

Trump warns China not to retaliate against tariff hike

Trump warns China not to retaliate against tariff hike U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday warned China not to retaliate against a hike in tariffs he imposed last week and said U.S. consumers would not pay for any increase in duties. There "is no reason for the U.S. Consumer to pay the Tariffs, which take effect on China today ... China should not retaliate-will only get worse!" Trump tweeted, adding that tariffs can be avoided if manufacturers shift production from China to other countries.

U-S President Donald Trump is on his way to Northern California, where he'll see the devastation from the deadliest American wildfire in a century. Congress Hates Trump ' s Tariffs , Yet Sits by Idly Instead of Acting By Wallner, James Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, May 20, 2019.

Trump ’ s quest to shatter GOP economics reached its peak in 2019. From trade to spending, from the Federal Reserve to paid parental leave, the president has embraced policy changes that historically are more in line with the Trump ’ s stock market rally is very good, but still lags Obama and Clinton.

But resolutions of disapproval only make it look like Congress is checking the president. This is because Congress must first give the president the power to take action before it can pass a disapproval resolution to reverse it.

The debate over trade policy in the nation’s capital highlights the superficial nature of disapproval mechanisms. One proposal ostensibly aimed at limiting President Trump's power to adjust tariffs underscores how legislators use resolutions of disapproval to make it look like they are taking meaningful action while doing the opposite. While support among Republicans in Congress for Trump’s aggressive stance in the trade war with China remains strong, frustration is mounting there due to its impact on Americans.

Republicans surrender to Trump’s China tariffs

Republicans surrender to Trump’s China tariffs GOP senators have no plans to even try to stop a trade war they oppose.

WASHINGTON — President Trump said Thursday that he would impose a 5 percent tariff on all imported goods from Mexico beginning June 10, a tax that would “gradually increase” until the flow of undocumented immigrants across the border stopped.

Trump ’ s future actions, including possible auto tariffs , could be more economically There is another trade fight Trump may soon pick with Congress . Trump wants to secure approval of his Nazworth, who sits on the editorial board as politics editor, said the website has sought to represent both sides

In the Senate especially, Republicans are increasingly willing to criticize the president’s decision to raise tariffs on goods imported from China. Even so, senators remain unwilling to limit his ability to do so in the first place. Senators may blame the president, but he cannot adjust tariffs under the Constitution without their prior permission.

If the Senate ever decides to take action, it will likely be only a modest step like limiting the president’s ability to adjust tariffs under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. Technically limited to imports that pose a threat to national security, the statute’s ambiguous definition of what constitutes such a threat empowers the president to raise tariffs for virtually any reason. Trump used this sweeping power last year to raise tariffs on several products that do not appear to pose actual national security threats to the United States.

Trump’s Tariffs Only Work if Americans Pay Them

Trump’s Tariffs Only Work if Americans Pay Them This fact is inseparable from the president’s eagerness to impose them.

Mr. Trump ’ s tariffs do not fit within any of those boxes. Moreover, the Trump administration is sacrificing real national security concerns for short-term economic gains. Congress needs to recognize the danger and limit the president’s authority to raise the specter of national security at

Congressional Republicans know that Trump ' s trade war will kill jobs and hurt the economy. An obscure provision in the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, intended to be used to address specific national security concerns, has been invoked by the White House to push through sweeping import taxes on

In response, Sens. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Pat Toomey, R-Pa., introduced competing proposals to check the president’s expansive power to adjust tariff rates under Section 232. Portman’s Trade Security Act does so by establishing a special process in Congress to disapprove administrative actions after they have become effective. In contrast, Toomey's Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act aims to check the president by requiring that Congress approve all administrative actions taken under Section 232 before they take effect.

At first glance, the two bills appear almost identical. They both aim to check the president. Yet on closer inspection, the effect that the proposals have on Congress’ ability to do so is drastically different. It turns out that the special process established by the Trade Security Act is not very special. The president remains structurally advantaged under it because of the legislation’s reliance on a disapproval process to check him. Trump’s ability to veto a joint resolution of disapproval effectively requires a two-thirds majority of the House and Senate to block the president in this area. The president’s supporters in the Senate could also filibuster a joint resolution, thereby making its passage through the chamber less likely. For these reasons, the Trade Security Act appears intended, not to check the president, but rather to help senators look like they are checking the president.

China’s state party posts defiant message about trade war with U.S. on social media site

China’s state party posts defiant message about trade war with U.S. on social media site The Chinese government posted a defiant message about its trade war with the U.S. on social media. "Bully us, wishful thinking!” it said in part.

This flaw is not unique to the Trade Security Act. Disapproval mechanisms, in general, are not an effective way to check the president because they profess to give Congress a power that it already has. Portman argues that his bill expands the current Section 232 disapproval process to cover all administrative actions taken under Section 232, not merely those already authorized in the original statute. Yet Article I of the Constitution empowers Congress to legislate in all areas related to tariffs, regardless of what the Trade Security Act covers.

Portman maintains that his disapproval process strikes the right balance between asserting congressional prerogatives in the policymaking process and protecting national security. Proponents of the Trade Security Act argue that an approval process, such as that included in Toomey’s Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act, endangers national security. According to this view, requiring Congress to approve trade policy before it can take effect, as directed by the Constitution, is too risky. It also assumes that Congress will not support a president's requested tariff adjustment when it is confronted with a clear threat to the nation's security. And it ignores the Article II powers that presidents possess to protect the nation's security as commander-in-chief of the armed services. Limiting Congress's Article I power to make trade policy is therefore unnecessary for defending the homeland.

The media is lying to you about Trump’s China tariffs

The media is lying to you about Trump’s China tariffs The hysteria must have a political agenda because the amount that’s being charged is peanuts.

The procedural approach to checking the president featured in Trade Security Act suggests that its real aim is to make it look like Congress is changing the status quo when, in reality, it is reinforcing it. As with the process established to disapprove presidential decisions to increase the debt ceiling, expanding the disapproval process in Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act will not limit presidential power in this area.

To check the president, Congress must instead require all presidential decisions to adjust tariffs under Section 232 to be approved by Congress before they can take effect. Of course, an approval mechanism does not guarantee that Congress will block the president's proposed action. Its members may decide to back the president. And then again, they may. Regardless, they must choose. That is what the Constitution requires.

James Wallner (@jiwallner) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a senior fellow at the R Street Institute. Previously, he was a Senate aide and a former group vice president for research at the Heritage Foundation.

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Joni Ernst, Iowa GOP senator, says US-China trade war 'hurtful' to farmers.
Republican Sen. Joni Ernst said Sunday that the US-China trade war is "hurtful" to farmers, a group that makes up a considerable portion of her Iowa constituency. "But as we have heard from our farmers, they do want us to find a path forward with China. The tariffs are hurtful right now, but the President will continue negotiating. We hope that we can get a deal soon," Ernst told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union." "This is a really difficult situation that the farmers are in. Just to remind the viewers that one in five jobs in Iowa is tied directly to trade.

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