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OpinionHow a Lone Republican Set an Example for Democrats on the Mueller Report

18:05  21 may  2019
18:05  21 may  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Mueller and House Democrats at impasse over how much of his testimony would be public

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“ Mueller ’s report reveals that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment,” Mr. Amash wrote on Twitter. “In fact,” he added in a 13-tweet explanation of his conclusions, “ Mueller ’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all

Republicans and the Justice Department have criticized Democrats for not at least reading the less-redacted version of the report released to lawmakers while Doug Collins, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, have seen it, according to the source, while House Intelligence ranking member

How a Lone Republican Set an Example for Democrats on the Mueller Report© Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Getty Images Representative Justin Amash, Republican of Michigan, said that President Trump had committed impeachable offenses.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

More than a year before the House Judiciary Committee adopted articles of impeachment against President Richard Nixon, Representative Pete McCloskey, a California Republican, became the first member of Congress to call for a discussion about whether to begin an impeachment inquiry over Watergate.

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[Read the Mueller Report : Searchable Document and Index]. Few Republicans expressed concern about Mr. Mueller ’s findings, with most lawmakers Other Democrats were more reluctant, arguing that the party was better off litigating the future on the campaign trail. “We should certainly see the

How many Democrats and Republicans are on Mueller ’s team? The Special Counsel’s office had made public the identities of 17 attorney staff members However, Trump’s assertion that there are no Republicans on the team is undercut by the fact that its leader is Mueller , who is registered as a

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Over the weekend, Representative Justin Amash of Michigan pulled a McCloskey of sorts. He became the first Republican in Congress to say that the report of the special counsel, Robert Mueller, showed that President Trump had committed impeachable offenses.

“Mueller’s report reveals that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment,” Mr. Amash wrote on Twitter.

“In fact,” he added in a 13-tweet explanation of his conclusions, “Mueller’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence.”

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The end of Mr. Mueller ’s inquiry also left Democrats on the defensive and will force them to decide how vigorously to continue pursuing allegations of misconduct by the president and Until they read the report for themselves, Democrats are hardly going to agree that the president has been cleared.

Why did Republicans block Senate Democrats ’ move on making the Mueller Report public? There is also the argument of whether the precedent set by Watergate proceedings is relevant. The democrats are wrong, without a court order opening up the grand jury testimony there is no way, my

Mr. Trump responded on Sunday by calling Mr. Amash “a total lightweight” and “a loser.” And on Monday, Mr. Amash went at it again on social media, dispelling common misconceptions about the Mueller report and its findings.

Mr. Amash isn’t likely to be a bellwether for his party. He is a libertarian who has long staked out his own positions on issues such as gay marriage, government surveillance and Mr. Trump’s entry restrictions on Muslim travelers.

But what is remarkable about Mr. Amash’s stand is how much tougher it is than that of the House’s Democratic leaders to date. Wary of a move that has little public support, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and prominent committee leaders have avoided talk of impeachment and have focused on learning what Attorney General William Barr redacted from the report, as well as subpoenaing testimony and documents.

That fight has little to show for itself so far. The House Judiciary Committee has already held Mr. Barr in contempt for defying a subpoena, and the administration has blocked the former White House counsel, Donald McGahn, from testifying about actions by the president that are at the heart of accusations of obstruction of justice. It still isn’t clear whether Mr. Mueller himself will testify.

GOP lawmaker says Trump’s conduct meets ‘threshold for impeachment’

GOP lawmaker says Trump’s conduct meets ‘threshold for impeachment’ Rep. Justin Amash is the first Republican congressman to accuse the president of obstruction of justice.

Media captionThe Mueller report - in 60 seconds. Democrats have vowed to continue pursuing Donald Trump over allegations he obstructed justice But while the report does say the president did not collude with the Russians, it did not come to a firm conclusion on the issue of obstruction of justice.

Mueller ’s report left several avenues of inquiry untouched, which he laid out under questioning from Rep. In his most extensive comments yet on the decision not to compel Trump to sit down for an interview, Mueller conceded the president’s written answers to questions — which he ultimately had

Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, who has long been one of Mr. Mueller’s strongest defenders, said last week that a “sterile report” was no match for direct congressional testimony from Mr. McGahn or Mr. Mueller. As the Watergate hearings showed, there is power in the public hearing directly from key officials.

But there is nothing sterile about the report, as Mr. Amash and others, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, have eloquently noted. In damning detail it describes the depth of Russian interference with our democracy, Mr. Trump’s associates’ willingness to engage with a foreign adversary and the president’s efforts to thwart Mr. Mueller’s operation.

It’s understandable that Democrats are concerned that an impeachment fight could distract from the issues at the heart of their campaign to unseat Mr. Trump and Republican members of Congress next year. The House needs to investigate aggressively the questionable conduct by this president and follow that inquiry where it leads.

But Democratic leaders also need to be stronger and clearer about what we know.

Schiff: Amash criticism not enough to push Trump impeachment

Schiff: Amash criticism not enough to push Trump impeachment A key Democrat says Republican Rep. Justin Amash's accusation that President Donald Trump engaged in "impeachable conduct" in the Russia investigation isn't enough to count as bipartisan support to launch impeachment proceedings. But House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff nevertheless is warning that Democrats remain on that potential path to force White House cooperation with the various congressional investigations into Trump's conduct. "It provides an additional tool," the California Democrat said. "What we have been doing is we have been gradually escalating the tactics we need to use to get information for the American people.

Walter Dellinger, who led the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel during the Clinton administration, expressed it well in a Washington Post op-ed last week.

“How different would it have been,” he wrote, “if a unified chorus of Democratic leaders in Congress and on the campaign trail had promptly proclaimed the actual truth: This report makes the unquestionable case that the president regularly and audaciously violated his oath and committed the most serious high crimes and misdemeanors.”

That’s what Mr. Amash concluded. And like Mr. McCloskey did all those years ago, he concluded that Mr. Trump’s pattern of obstructive behavior was enough for the House to fulfill its constitutional duties.

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Read More

In and Out of Character, Robert Mueller Makes His Lone Appearance as Special Counsel.
By the standards of Robert S. Mueller III, the government’s most prominent ascetic, Wednesday’s nearly 10-minute statement in a seventh-floor conference room of the Justice Department was a circus. There were dozens of cameras, harsh lighting and live cut-ins on network television. For the first time in his two-year job as special counsel — and fittingly, on the day he announced his retirement — Mr. Mueller tried explaining himself. His performance revealed just how far Mr. Mueller was willing to stray from his highly practiced restraint.

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