•   
  •   
  •   

OpinionEven Democrats Don’t Like Democrats’ Talking Points On Health Care

14:17  28 june  2019
14:17  28 june  2019 Source:   thefederalist.com

Exclusive: 'The VA is two-faced.' Whistleblowers say managers are trying to silence them on veteran care

Exclusive: 'The VA is two-faced.' Whistleblowers say managers are trying to silence them on veteran care Three Veterans Affairs health care professionals who reported patient care issues say the agency continues to try to silence them, jeopardizing veterans and undercutting a key Trump promise of whistleblower protection.

Despite time for all 10 Democratic candidates to lay out a plan in the 2020 presidential health debate, nothing of substance on health care arose. During the first night of the Democratic primary debates, health care was the first major issue up for deliberation, but with little-to-no proposals laid out for the

As Democrats prepare to debate health care reform during the last debate before the first votes, a former top insurance company executive warned “What’s different now is that it’s the Democrats parroting the misleading ‘choice’ talking point — and even using it as a weapon against one another.

Even Democrats Don’t Like Democrats’ Talking Points On Health Care© The Federalist Even Democrats Don’t Like Democrats’ Talking Points On Health Care

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

During the first night of the Democratic primary debates, health care was the first major issue up for deliberation, but with little-to-no proposals laid out for the American people. Instead, there were simply vague references to everything from pharma pricing to Medicare For All (MFA). In fact, Sen. Elizabeth Warren refused to even comment on whether she supports limits on abortions. And Cory Booker got tongue-tied asserting that health care “is not just a human right, it’s an American right.”

Health care, climate change, immigration: What issues will be front and center on the debate stage?

Health care, climate change, immigration: What issues will be front and center on the debate stage? USA TODAY has put together a primer on some of the topics that the candidates are expected to tackle over the two nights of debate.

The Democrats ’ Gamble on Health Care for the Undocumented. And that division underscores a larger point : While the most left-leaning positions in the Led by Senator Bernie Sanders, nearly a half-dozen 2020 Democrats have embraced a clear position of offering full access to health - care

Democrats 2018: It's the health care , stupid. “After the Affordable Care Act passed, Democrats ran away from health care as a campaign talking point while Republicans used the issue as a central point of attack,” said “ Democrats are focused like a laser on health care and will not be diverted.”

While there are currently many flavors of Democrats participating in the first presidential debate—and even more in the 2020 presidential race—and diversity in universal health care “plans,” no one plan seems to be getting much traction within the party.

For example, as Ezekiel Emanuel—the oncologist, bioethicist, advisor to President Obama on the Affordable Care Act, and brother of Rahm Emanuel—pointed out just hours before the debate at an event in DC, Americans like Medicare For All in theory, but not in practice. This makes the “debate” around MFA a waste of time for everyone on stage.

He also asserted that at present, “Wrangling all the Democrats is a challenge,” and wished those running on the Democratic ticket would spend their time more fruitfully than on proposals like Medicare For All.

Democrats spar over health care, immigration at first debate, agree Trump economy rigged

Democrats spar over health care, immigration at first debate, agree Trump economy rigged The 10 candidates, who talked policy and occasionally mixed it up with one another, took the stage in Miami for the face off, hosted by NBC News.

And Democrats , emboldened by the midterm gains they achieved largely by focusing on health Campaign advisers say they've heard little talk of positive messaging on the issue, despite how "While President Trump has expanded health care choices and decreased costs, not to mention

Even in red states, Democrats during the midterms talked up the law's safeguard for people with pre-existing conditions, which became a major talking point in part because it has come under Biden has frequently discussed health care as a right but is yet to stake out a claim in this newer debate.

That didn’t stop a MFA question from quickly dividing the field into those who would eliminate private health insurance and those who would not do so immediately. Warren affirmed that she supported Sen. Bernie Sander’s MFA bill (that she co-sponsored along with Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, and others), as did New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. It would create a single-payer, government-run Medicare system across the U.S. with no private option.

This is in contrast to Beto O’Rourke (among others, such as Amy Klobuchar and Tulsi Gabbard) who stated that he “would not replace private insurance.” Under those versions, there would still be universal coverage, but piecemealed across variations of employer-provided insurance, privately purchased insurance, and government-funded insurance.

But the best line of the night was delivered by John Delaney, who directly confronted his peers who want to do away with private insurance by asserting, “If you go to every hospital in this country and you ask them one question, which is how would it have been for you last year if every one of your bills were paid at the Medicare rate? Every single hospital administrator said they would close. And the Medicare For All bill requires payments to stay at current Medicare rates. So, to some extent we're basically supporting a bill that will have every hospital closed.”

Candidates slam Trump at Democratic debate, but fight over racial issues, health care

Candidates slam Trump at Democratic debate, but fight over racial issues, health care The contenders went after the president on the economy, tax cuts and the border at the face off hosted by NBC in Miami.

This blows a hole in the centrist Democrat talking points about M4A being too extreme and hurting people, and it shows that if Democrats are serious As we have repeatedly said, Medicare for all who want it is basically being set up to fail. Just like the affordable care act, Medicare for all who want it

Democrats running for president have said they would support extending government health care coverage to undocumented immigrants -- a big shift, since undocumented immigrants currently have little access to federal programs.

This brought about a discussion on insurance companies and their role in the broader system. Unfortunately, it was not an honest assessment of the ongoing and future role of health insurance in America.

According to Warren, insurance companies are a “giant industry that wants the system to stay the way it is.” On that part, she’s 100 percent correct. But she failed to follow through with any plan to change that, as did everyone on stage. They know insurance in the U.S. is a trillion-dollar industry. Like it or not, an industry that big can’t be put out of business easily.

There was also a glaring omission of the universal coverage discussion: auto-enrollment, which must be addressed to get the uninsured insured, even if that entails enrolling people the moment they touch the care system. Gabbard came the closest to addressing coverage concerns when she touched on universal coverage. But she asserted it would be a cost-savings to Americans. She claimed it “will reduce administrative costs and bureaucratic costs.”

But it didn’t appear that anyone else on stage or in the audience was buying it. So deeper conversation was avoided.

Liberals Ruled the Debates. Will Moderates Regain Their Voices?

Liberals Ruled the Debates. Will Moderates Regain Their Voices? The Democratic debates provided the clearest evidence yet that many of the leading candidates are embracing sweeping liberal policy changes, even at the risk of political backlash. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

The same avoidance of substantive discussion went for pharmaceutical companies as well. The Democratic candidates were quick to attack pharma pricing. But again, there were no major announcements or plans for change. Instead, there was finger pointing.

Klobuchar blamed President Trump for failing to follow through on his commitments to lower drug prices (although she didn’t propose a solution of her own). Or, as she put it, his attempts to lower drug prices were, “all foam and no beer.”

Despite dedicated time for all 10 Democratic candidates to lay out a plan or set themselves apart in the 2020 presidential health debate, nothing of substance came from the first night of debate.

We can only hope that on the second night candidates might begin to address deeper and more specific problems and solutions, such as coverage for children, cost reduction for the elderly and those responsible for parents in long-term care, mental health reform, or medical school loan payoffs to address the doctor shortages across the country.

Based on the first night of debates, I won’t get my hopes up. Like Emanuel, however, I’ll keep wishing that the Democrats running for president spend their time more fruitfully than on proposals like Medicare For All.

Read More

Trump reaches career-high approval, yet faces a range of reelection risks: Poll.
A new ABC News/Washington Post poll and runs competitively for reelection against four of five possible Democratic contenders. Yet he remains broadly unpopular across personal and professional measures, marking his vulnerabilities in the 2020 election. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Forty-four percent of Americans approve of Trump’s overall job performance, up a slight 5 percentage points from April and 2 points better than his peak early in his presidency.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!