•   
  •   
  •   

OpinionTrump Makes Clear What Black Voters Had to Lose

17:35  30 july  2019
17:35  30 july  2019 Source:   theatlantic.com

White Anxiety, and a President Ready to Address It

White Anxiety, and a President Ready to Address It Two forces convulsing American politics found each other at President Trump’s rally in North Carolina this week: a sense of anxiety among white voters about their standing in a country that is growing more diverse, and a politician intent on stoking those worries. Surveys show fears among some white people that they are losing status in America, and those holding such views are increasingly aligned with the Republican Party. These voters perceive anti-white discrimination. A growing share say the nation risks losing its identity because of openness to foreigners.

“What the hell do you have to lose ?” Trump said, addressing his question to black voters . The point, he said, was that African American communities The Trump administration has also waged a years-long campaign to undermine the Affordable Care Act. The nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation has

“What the hell do you have to lose ?” Trump said, addressing his question to black voters . The point, he said, was that African American communities were Trump has sabotaged a law that guaranteed health insurance for many African Americans. He has undermined protections for voting rights.

Updated on July 30 at 9:32 a.m. ET

Trump Makes Clear What Black Voters Had to Lose© Gerald Herbert / AP Donald Trump at a rally in Dimondale, Michigan, in August 2016

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

In late summer 2016, the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump embarked on what he claimed was an appeal to African American voters. In August, Trump traveled to Michigan for an event that was part of the push, though reporters noted that his speech was actually given in a predominantly white suburb of Lansing.

Mueller testimony won’t lead to Trump’s impeachment

Mueller testimony won’t lead to Trump’s impeachment Anyone hoping that former Special Counsel Robert Mueller will offer explosive testimony before two House committees Wednesday that will lead to President Trump’s impeachment is in for a serious disappointment. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The public’s high expectations for the hearings by the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees have been perpetuated by a constant mainstream media narrative that suggests Mueller’s testimony will be a political bombshell.

“What the hell do you have to lose ?” the president asked in the summer of 2016. The answer is now only all too plain. Trump said, addressing his question to black voters . The point, he said, was that African American communities were already a shambles, and their condition could only improve.

Donald Trump makes a plea for the black and poor vote at a campaign rally Friday night in Dimondale, Michigan following a tour of the devastation of flood-ravaged Just remember it. So, you have nothing to lose . one thing we know for sure is that if you keep voting for the same people, you will keep

“What the hell do you have to lose?” Trump said, addressing his question to black voters. The point, he said, was that African American communities were already a shambles, and their condition could only improve. The remarks drew shocked reactions at the time.

Three years later, as the president attacks Representative Elijah Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, the answer to his question is clear. Trump has sabotaged a law that guaranteed health insurance for many African Americans. He has undermined protections for voting rights. His Justice Department has stopped going after police departments that discriminated against African Americans. He has rolled back environmental protections. Beyond policy, he has used rhetoric that suggests the citizenship of African Americans and other minorities is conditional and less than that of white Americans.

2020 tests if Dems can win enough black voters without Obama

2020 tests if Dems can win enough black voters without Obama When Barack Obama was on the ballot in 2008 and 2012, there was no question that Terrance Holmes would vote for the first black president. But as he helped fix cars this week at a repair shop on Detroit's west side, he recalled his ambivalence about the 2016 campaign. © Provided by The Associated Press In this July 23, 2019, photo, auto repairman Terrance Holmes is interviewed in Detroit.

Black voters would be open to GOP politicians who understand their policy views, but the party has slammed the door on reaching out to African-Americans by selecting Trump (CNN) Donald Trump is making his pitch to African-American voters in these terms: "What the hell do you have to lose ?"

"What do you have to lose ?" Trump asked again and again. It' s a question that Trump first posed to African American voters during a rally in North Carolina on "It could not be clearer how much African Americans have to lose under Donald Trump ," Marlon Marshall, Clinton' s director of state campaigns

Whenever he is accused of racism, which is frequently, Trump is quick to cite black unemployment rates, which are at historic lows. The president invokes this as if it’s a special favor he has bestowed on African Americans, rather than a self-evident policy goal of the government. Insofar as African American employment has improved, it’s simply as part of a generally growing economy, not targeted policies. Moreover, as Peter Nicholas reports, black unemployment remains twice as high as white rates, and the gap in wages between races is growing. Trump has at other times cited the First Step Act, a bipartisan criminal-justice reform law he signed in late 2018. Advocates have widely hailed the law as a positive move.

But in other areas, Trump’s policy record for African Americans is dismal. Begin with policing, a subject of intimate relevance in Baltimore. The city was shaken by protests in April 2015, after the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody. It was one in a long string of deaths of people under arrest, and the city convulsed in violence. In the aftermath, the Obama Justice Department probed the Baltimore Police Department and found a horrifying record of racial discrimination and disparate enforcement. Baltimore was one of several cities where DOJ investigated abuses and used consent decrees to force departments to reform amid evidence of widespread abuses of African Americans at the hands of police officers.

James Comey: 'Millions of 2016 Trump voters are not racists' and should spurn him in 2020

James Comey: 'Millions of 2016 Trump voters are not racists' and should spurn him in 2020 Former FBI Director James Comey joined the chorus of critics lashing out at President Trump for his tweets venting at Rep. Elijah Cummings and calling the Democrat's Baltimore-based district a "disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess." © (J. Scott Applewhite/AP) Former FBI Director James Comey speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill Washington, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, after a second closed-door interview with two Republican-led committees investigating what they say was bias at the Justice Department before the 2016 presidential election.

Donald Trump has a new strategy to win black voters , who are overwhelmingly rejecting him in polls. Black voters consistently support Democrats "Look at how much African American communities are suffering from Democratic control. To those I say the following: What do you have to lose by trying

Donald Trump is continuing his misguided attempt to woo Black voters with a simple question: “What do you have to lose ?” According to many in the African-American community Trump made his tone-deaf appeal during a rally in Dimondale, Michigan, a town with a population that is 93 percent White.

[Read: Can Trump’s Justice Department undo police reform?]

But shortly after the Trump administration took over, then–Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Justice Department would no longer pursue such arrangements. “It is not the responsibility of the federal government to manage non-federal law enforcement agencies,” he said. “The misdeeds of individual bad actors should not impugn or undermine the legitimate and honorable work that law enforcement officers and agencies perform in keeping American communities safe.” DOJ attempted to undo the already agreed-upon Baltimore consent decree. In a speech on Long Island in 2017, Trump even celebrated roughing up suspects.

The Trump administration has also waged a years-long campaign to undermine the Affordable Care Act. The nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation has found that the law significantly increased insurance coverage for African Americans, with uninsured rates falling from 19 percent in 2013 to 11 percent in 2017, but the president has undertaken a number of steps that KFF says will exacerbate racial gaps in health care. In March, the Justice Department reversed its position on a pending case, announcing that it supported a lower-court judge’s ruling that would strike the entire law. Despite promising a better replacement, Trump has not offered a plan to replace the law if it’s struck down, and Congress has given up as well. The administration is also squeezing states that wish to expand Medicaid coverage under the ACA.

How third-party votes sunk Clinton, what they mean for Trump

How third-party votes sunk Clinton, what they mean for Trump For all the talk about why Donald Trump was elected president while losing the popular vote and how he could win again, one of the least discussed results of the 2016 election offers valuable lessons for Democrats. © Provided by CQ Roll Call, Inc. In the 2016, Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton received a smaller percentage of the vote compared to previous major party candidates. That dynamic has ramifications for the 2020 presidential election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo) An astounding 7.8 million voters cast their presidential ballots for someone other than Trump or Hillary Clinton.

Donald Trump made a campaign stop and gave a speech in Dimondale, Michigan on Friday, August 19th, 2016 in which he made the controversial statement: "You're living in poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58% of your youth is unemployed -- what the hell do you have to lose ?"

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump signs a " Make America Great Again" hat after his campaign rally Friday, August 19, 2016 at the Summit Sports and Ice Complex in Dimondale. In his speech Trump appealed to African American voters asking "What do you have to lose ?"

When the Trump administration is not working to reduce health-care access for black Americans, it is taking steps that could make more of them sick. The president has sought to undo a range of environmental protections, even as a study of pollution by Trump’s own Environmental Protection Agency found that “results at national, state, and county scales all indicate that non-Whites tend to be burdened disproportionately to Whites.”

The most potent weapon against policies like these, the guarantor of political rights, is the ability to vote. That has also historically been a fragile right for African Americans, often deprived or eroded. Since taking office, Trump has made it harder for black citizens to exercise their right to vote. The Justice Department switched its position in gerrymandering and voter-ID lawsuits, supporting defendant states against plaintiffs challenging laws. Trump has also subscribed to conspiracy theories about massive numbers of illegal votes, all in service of stricter voter laws that depress minority turnout.

Worse, perhaps, than all of these concrete policy effects has been the symbolic message that Trump has sent, deeming African Americans second-class citizens. This has taken several forms in the past month alone: his suggestion that the black and brown women of the “squad” of progressive Democratic congresswomen “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came” (all four are American citizens, and all but one are native-born); his ratification of a “Send her back” chant at a rally; his attacks on Cummings; and his consistent labeling of people and communities of color as “infested” or “infestations.” These are all, as my colleague Adam Serwer has written, manifestations of “the president’s belief that American citizenship is conditional for people of color, who should be grateful we are even allowed to be here.”

Would Trump overplay his hand against Warren or Harris?

Would Trump overplay his hand against Warren or Harris? President Trump has been on a real Twitter tear lately. He's picked fights with "the Squad" — the quartet of progressive first-term Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (Minn.), Rashida Tlaib (Mich.), and Ayanna Pressley (Mass.) — House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), activist and commentator Al Sharpton, and the entire city of Baltimore, with each salvo widely condemned as racist. It's not just the

Baltimore certainly has its struggles. Since Gray’s death, the murder rate in the city has surged. The mayor resigned amid corruption allegations in May, the second mayor to step down in a scandal in a decade. Parts of the city struggle with intense poverty. But blaming Cummings for this misses the point in two different ways. The median income in Cummings’s district is, as Nicholas notes, above the national average. Beyond that, Trump seems to misunderstand Cummings’s role: He’s a U.S. representative, which means that the oversight that has enraged Trump is very much his responsibility, but he is not the mayor, which means that local governance is not within his ambit.

Besides, Trump in 2016 promised the nation that when it came to problems like poverty and squalor in Baltimore, “I alone can fix it.” He specifically criticized Barack Obama for not doing enough for the city. Now, however, Trump wants Baltimore and other major cities—as well as hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico—to fix themselves. When he travels the country, Trump sticks as much as possible to the white, rural districts that elected him, while avoiding the urban and minority-heavy ones that spurned him.

It is true, as Trump noted, that other politicians, including Bernie Sanders, have lamented conditions in Baltimore. Yet Sanders made those comments while demanding that the federal government do better for the city and after touring West Baltimore. Trump made his remarks while writing off a city. He evinces no interest in visiting or improving the city, which he has never bothered to visit as president, even though it’s just 40 miles from Washington, D.C. The struggles of any African American residents there are useful as a political bludgeon, but otherwise they are up to the residents (and their African American congressman) to deal with.

As the 2020 election approaches, Trump’s question to African American voters is no longer a hypothetical or rhetorical question. So what the hell do they have to lose? Just their health, their health insurance, their right not to be abused by police, their right to vote, and their status as full members of the American polity.

Read More

Buttigieg: 'Systemic racism is a white problem'.
Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg (D) said Thursday that "systemic racism" in the U.S. "is a white problem," following a mass shooting over the weekend that authorities said involved a suspect believed to be a white supremacist. Speaking at the National Association of Black Journalists conference in Miami, the South Bend, Ind., mayor said the U.S. was "by no means even halfway done dealing with systemic racism in this country." "I hope over the course of this campaign, you will see how I speak about these issues - not only with mostly black audiences, but with mostly white audiences," Buttigieg continued.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!