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Opinion Impeach Trump. Then Move On.

01:15  01 november  2019
01:15  01 november  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Trump compares impeachment process to 'a lynching'

  Trump compares impeachment process to 'a lynching' President Donald Trump compared the impeachment process to "a lynching" on Twitter.Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) arrives with Rep. Juan Vargas (D-CA) to hear testimony from U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland behind closed-doors, as part of the impeachment inquiry led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Oct. 17.

The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, bottom, on Thursday during a vote on rules for the impeachment inquiry. Credit Erin Schaff/The New York Times.

On Wednesday, the House voted to impeach Mr Trump on two charges. The charges - that the president abused his power and obstructed Congress - centre on whether or not he improperly sought help from Ukraine to boost his chances of re-election in 2020. Mr Trump now faces a trial in the

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a person standing in front of a store window: The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, bottom, on Thursday during a vote on rules for the impeachment inquiry.© Erin Schaff/The New York Times The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, bottom, on Thursday during a vote on rules for the impeachment inquiry.

Is it possible that more than 20 Republican senators will vote to convict Donald Trump of articles of impeachment? When you hang around Washington you get the sense that it could happen.

The evidence against Trump is overwhelming. This Ukraine quid pro quo wasn’t just a single reckless phone call. It was a multiprong several-month campaign to use the levers of American power to destroy a political rival.

Analysis: Democrats Want to Impeach Trump. They Haven’t Decided Why.

  Analysis: Democrats Want to Impeach Trump. They Haven’t Decided Why. The articles of impeachment could be focused solely on Ukraine — or they could be a broader indictment of the president's wrongdoing.But while that decision helped quell years of frantic debate over whether and why and how Democrats might seek to remove the president, it also foreshadowed the coming battle among House Democrats about what the actual articles of impeachment should look like. Democrats seem to have made strides in their investigation in recent weeks, but they still have this major hurdle to resolve — a hurdle that could have significant implications not just for the success of the inquiry, but for Democrats’ ability to keep control of the House in 2020.

Mr Trump became only the third president in US history to be impeached after two votes in the Democratic Party-controlled House of Representatives - but more on what that means below. President Trump , who is a Republican, strongly denies any wrongdoing.

To impeach or not to impeach ? It’s the question that’s been bitterly dividing Democrats since they gained Since then , pressure has been building for Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi to begin Among them are Democrats on the six critical committees tasked with investigating whether the

Republican legislators are being bludgeoned with this truth in testimony after testimony. They know in their hearts that Trump is guilty of impeachable offenses. It’s evident in the way they stare glumly at their desks during hearings; the way they flee reporters seeking comment; the way they slag the White House off the record. It’ll be hard for them to vote to acquit if they can’t even come up with a non-ludicrous rationale.

And yet when you get outside Washington it’s hard to imagine more than one or two G.O.P. senators voting to convict.

In the first place, Democrats have not won widespread public support. Nancy Pelosi always said impeachment works only if there’s a bipartisan groundswell, and so far there is not. Trump’s job approval numbers have been largely unaffected by the impeachment inquiry. Support for impeachment breaks down on conventional pro-Trump/anti-Trump lines. Roughly 90 percent of Republican voters oppose it. Republican senators will never vote to convict in the face of that.

Defense Department official Laura Cooper to testify in impeachment inquiry about military aid to Ukraine

  Defense Department official Laura Cooper to testify in impeachment inquiry about military aid to Ukraine Congressional investigators want to ask Laura Cooper, who oversees Ukraine policy at the Pentagon, about the withholding of military aid to Ukraine.Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) arrives with Rep. Juan Vargas (D-CA) to hear testimony from U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland behind closed-doors, as part of the impeachment inquiry led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Oct. 17.

Talk of impeachment began long before President Donald Trump was even elected. “If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn’t they be a crime for Donald Trump ?” On Wednesday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told the Associated Press that impeaching

If Trump is impeached , the process will then move to the Senate, where a trial will be held to determine whether Trump is guilty of the charges Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said there is "no chance" Trump will be removed from office and promised to take his cues on how to run the

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Second, Democrats have not won over the most important voters — moderates in swing states. A New York Times/Siena College survey of voters in Arizona, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin found that just 43 percent want to impeach and remove Trump from office, while 53 percent do not. Pushing impeachment makes Democrats vulnerable in precisely the states they cannot afford to lose in 2020.

Third, there is little prospect these numbers will turn around, even after a series of high-profile hearings.

I’ve been traveling pretty constantly since this impeachment thing got going. I’ve been to a bunch of blue states and a bunch of red states (including Kansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah). In coastal blue states, impeachment comes up in conversation all the time. In red states, it never comes up; ask people in red states if they’ve been talking about it with their friends, they shrug and reply no, not really.

Rudy Giuliani associates Parnas and Fruman face arraignment in campaign finance conspiracy case

  Rudy Giuliani associates Parnas and Fruman face arraignment in campaign finance conspiracy case Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman will be arraigned Wednesday on campaign finance charges. Lev Parnas, 46, a U.S. citizen born in Ukraine, and Igor Fruman, 53, a U.S. citizen born in Belarus, are set for arraignment in Manhattan federal court before U.S. District Court Judge Paul Oetken.The arraignment follows delays in posting security for their $1 million bonds, which will allow them to remain free while the court case against them continues.A criminal indictment unsealed on Oct.

Schiff seized on Trump ’s reference to Joe Biden’s bragging about getting a corruption prosecutor in Ukraine fired, to claim that this amounted to “soliciting foreign If Trump wins re-election in November – which increasingly looks like it might happen – expect the Democrats to try to impeach him again.

Узнать причину. Закрыть. BREAKING: House moves to impeach Trump ! M. Tracey. Загрузка "SO SAD DEMOCRATS": President Trump Takes On MEDIA During News Conference - Продолжительность: 22:35 FOX 10 Phoenix 298 406 просмотров.

Prof. Paul Sracic of Youngstown State University in Ohio told Ken Stern from Vanity Fair that when he asked his class of 80 students if they’d heard any conversation about impeachment, only two said they had. When he asked if impeachment interested them, all 80 said it did not.

That’s exactly what I’ve found, too. For most, impeachment is not a priority. It’s a dull background noise — people in Washington and the national media doing the nonsense they always do. A pollster can ask Americans if they support impeachment, and some yes or no answer will be given, but the fundamental reality is that many Americans are indifferent.

Fourth, it’s a lot harder to do impeachment in an age of cynicism, exhaustion and distrust. During Watergate, voters trusted federal institutions and granted the impeachment process a measure of legitimacy. Today’s voters do not share that trust and will not regard an intra-Washington process as legitimate.

Many Americans don’t care about impeachment because they take it as a given that this is the kind of corruption that politicians of all stripes have been doing all along. Many don’t care because it looks like the same partisan warfare that’s been going on forever, just with a different name.

Trump, allies push back on ‘quid pro quo,’ say envoy testified Ukraine initially unaware of aid holdup

  Trump, allies push back on ‘quid pro quo,’ say envoy testified Ukraine initially unaware of aid holdup President Trump and allies in Congress pushed back against damaging revelations from diplomat Bill Taylor’s Tuesday testimony.Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, asserted that this counters claims of a “quid pro quo.

While Democrats could impeach Mr. Trump by themselves on a majority vote in the House, they would need at least 20 In effect, though, Ms. Pelosi’s articulated standard then leaves impeachment in the hands of the president’s own party. So long as Mr. Trump retains strong support among Republican

This documentary on Trump 's adviser and longtime Republican operative, Roger Stone, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival before its upcoming Netflix release on May 12. But then again Republicans running away from Trump is very different from Republicans impeaching him.

Fifth, it’s harder to do impeachment when politics is seen as an existential war for the future of the country. Many Republicans know Trump is guilty, but they can’t afford to hand power to Nancy Pelosi, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders.

Progressives, let me ask you a question: If Trump-style Republicans were trying to impeach a President Biden, Warren or Sanders, and there was evidence of guilt, would you vote to convict? Answer honestly.

I get that Democrats feel they have to proceed with impeachment to protect the Constitution and the rule of law. But there is little chance they will come close to ousting the president. So I hope they set a Thanksgiving deadline. Play the impeachment card through November, have the House vote and then move on to other things. The Senate can quickly dispose of the matter and Democratic candidates can make their best pitches for denying Trump re-election.

Elizabeth Bruenig of The Washington Post put her finger on something important in a recent essay on Trump’s evangelical voters: the assumption of decline. Many Trump voters take it as a matter of course that for the rest of their lives things are going to get worse for them — economically, spiritually, politically and culturally. They are not the only voters who think this way. Many young voters in their OK Boomer T-shirts feel exactly the same, except about climate change, employment prospects and debt.

This sense of elite negligence in the face of national decline is the core issue right now. Impeachment is a distraction from that. As quickly as possible, it’s time to move on.

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'What I said was accurate': Sen. Kennedy defends calling Pelosi 'dumb' .
Sen. John Kennedy defended himself for having called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi "dumb."Sen. John Kennedy defended himself for having called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi "dumb" during a Wednesday night rally with President Trump in Louisiana.

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