Opinion: Who’s Afraid of Elizabeth Warren? - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Opinion Who’s Afraid of Elizabeth Warren?

17:00  12 november  2019
17:00  12 november  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

'Saturday Night Live': Kate McKinnon Shines as Impassioned Elizabeth Warren at Town Hall Rally

  'Saturday Night Live': Kate McKinnon Shines as Impassioned Elizabeth Warren at Town Hall Rally In a rare 'SNL' move, the show's optimistic cold open mocked voters, not politics.McKinnon's Warren got her own punches in, comedically speaking, taking a shot at Donald Trump, who she mocked for moving to Florida to avoid paying taxes. Warren went on to say that she pays taxes in every state on general principal.

President Trump has been good for America’ s billionaires. He slashed corporate taxes, cut the top income tax rate and raised the total exemption for the estate tax, directly benefiting several hundred billionaires and their heirs.

From Reuters TV. March 1, 2013. It may be a long list -- bankers and regulators have reason to fear the new senator from Massachusetts. That' s because

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Elizabeth Warren at a rally on Monday in N.H. Billionaires have gone public with their attack on her proposed tax policy, but it’s voters who will have the final say.© Sarah Rice for The New York Times Elizabeth Warren at a rally on Monday in N.H. Billionaires have gone public with their attack on her proposed tax policy, but it’s voters who will have the final say.

President Trump has been good for America’s billionaires. He slashed corporate taxes, cut the top income tax rate and raised the total exemption for the estate tax, directly benefiting several hundred billionaires and their heirs. He’s placed wealthy supporters in key positions of government like the Commerce Department, rolled back Obama-era financial regulations and privileged the interests of favored industries — like resource extraction and fossil fuel production — above all else.

Joe Biden slams Elizabeth Warren's 'wrong presidential primary' comment as elitist

  Joe Biden slams Elizabeth Warren's 'wrong presidential primary' comment as elitist Joe Biden slammed Elizabeth Warren as out of touch after she accused him of running in the "wrong presidential primary," writing in a Medium post on Tuesday that such attacks are "condescending to the millions of Democrats who have a different view."Joe Biden slammed Elizabeth Warren as out of touch after she accused him of running in the "wrong presidential primary," writing in a Medium post on Tuesday that such attacks are "condescending to the millions of Democrats who have a different view.

Lew extols the virtues of the recently established Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and what it can do for you if you find yourself in an unfair

Many Democrats are afraid to run a female candidate in 2020 — why?

There are billionaires who oppose Trump, of course. But for the most part they aren’t class traitors. They still want the government to work in their favor. They still want to keep their taxes low, just without the dysfunction — and gratuitous cruelty — of the current administration. And they want Democrats to choose a conventional nominee: a moderate standard-bearer who doesn’t want to make fundamental changes to the economy, from greatly increased taxes to greater worker control.

Sign Up for the Morning Briefing Newsletter

Plenty of Democratic voters agree. But just as many have rallied behind candidates who want a more equal, more democratic economy. Two of the three leading candidates — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren — want new taxes on the wealthiest Americans and their assets. Sanders has the steeper tax but Warren is not far behind former vice president Joe Biden in national polling and leads the field in both Iowa and New Hampshire. With Biden struggling to break away from the pack, it looks like Warren actually could be the nominee, and anti-Trump billionaires are worried.

Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders take swipes at billionaire Michael Bloomberg in response to his potential presidential bid

  Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders take swipes at billionaire Michael Bloomberg in response to his potential presidential bid Both senators have proposed taxes on ultra-wealthy Americans, much to the dismay of billionaire philanthropists like Bill Gates and Leon Cooperman.Warren welcomed Bloomberg to the 2020 race with a tweet, but the welcome came with an edge as she added a link to her billionaire calculator, which calculates the tax rate of the billionaires under her proposed wealth tax.

Elizabeth Warren , one of the loudest voices for reigning in Wall Street and for addressing our nation' s rampant inequality, at the very least embodies a certain set of Democratic Party values. Hillary Clinton primarily embodies the value of Getting Hillary Clinton Elected President.

Harry Hamburg/Associated Press Elizabeth Warren , head of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, told a House subcommittee on Wednesday, “We do not envision new rules as the main focus of how the C.F.P.B. can best protect consumers.” But will this fight feature a classic left vs. right set-piece

That’s why one of them, Mike Bloomberg, has floated a plan to run for the Democratic nomination. And why others have gone public with their attacks on Warren.

Mark Cuban, a billionaire investor, said Warren — whose wealth tax calls for a 2 percent tax on households with more than $50 million in assets and a 6 percent tax on households with assets of more than $1 billion — is “selling shiny objects to divert attention from reality.”

Another billionaire investor, Leon Cooperman, called Warren’s wealth tax a “bankrupt concept,” said it could “lead to inappropriate actions in the economy that are counterproductive” and warned that Warren is “taking the country down a very wrong path.”

“What she’s peddling is bull. Total, complete bull,” Cooperman said last week on CNBC, “That comes from someone who believes in a progressive income tax structure, who believes the rich should pay more.”

In a shift, Warren responds to Biden’s ‘angry’ comment

  In a shift, Warren responds to Biden’s ‘angry’ comment “I’m angry and I own it,” the candidate said in an email to some supporters.In an email to some supporters Friday, Warren (D-Mass.) turned the criticism from her Democratic rival into a rallying cry, writing, “I’m angry and I own it.

“ Who in the world would consider it appropriate to have one person appointed to set the rules for the entire financial industry?” wonders Senator Bob Corker. Clearly, what we have here is a scene straight out of South Park: a Godzilla-like CFPB with the face of Elizabeth Warren on a rampage.

Big banks, Republicans and even some Democrats did not want Elizabeth Warren to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Why is everyone scared of

A few days later, Cooperman announced his support for Bloomberg’s potential candidacy.

Bill Gates also thinks Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax goes too far: “I’ve paid over $10 billion in taxes. I’ve paid more than anyone in taxes. If I had to have paid $20 billion, it’s fine. But when you say I should pay $100 billion, then I’m starting to do a little math about what I have left over.” He claimed that he was “just kidding,” but when asked if he would support Warren over Trump, he demurred. Instead, he said, he’d cast a ballot for whichever candidate had the “more professional approach.”

If there’s a prominent billionaire who hasn’t taken a public stance on Warren, it’s Jeff Bezos, the chief executive of Amazon. But he did urge Bloomberg to run for president earlier this year, perhaps a sign that he too is worried about the outcome of the Democratic primary.

All of this is understandable. As my colleague Patty Cohen notes, if Warren’s wealth tax had been in effect since 1982, Gates would have had $13.9 billion in 2018 instead of $97 billion, Bezos would have $48.8 billion instead of $160 billion, and Bloomberg would have had $12.3 billion instead of $51.8 billion. They would still be billionaires, but Warren’s tax would have taken a significant chunk out of their assets. And even if the wealth tax never became law, a Warren administration would still take a hard line on financial regulation, consumer protection and tax enforcement, key areas of interest for the super rich. It’s impossible to imagine a Warren White House in which billionaires would have the same access and favored status that they do with Trump.

Warren proposes 'corporate perjury' law related to industry-funded research

  Warren proposes 'corporate perjury' law related to industry-funded research U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren on Tuesday proposed a new "corporate perjury" law that she would pursue if elected to the White House, inspired by Exxon Mobil Corp's failure to share accurate climate change research with government regulators. © Reuters/Jonathan Drake FILE PHOTO: Elizabeth Warren speaks at a rally in Raleigh Warren said companies and executives could face criminal liability for false information they knowingly provide to U.S. agencies, leading to up to $250,000 in fines or jail time.

“My interest in Warren is only cultural as I cannot vote for her and would probably vote for Brown if I lived in Massachusetts. Most essential in my Hill essay were my comments on Emerson. His vision of America is elementary today: We are born free in the forest and should remain free from Europeanism.

The attacks on Elizabeth Warren and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) just keep coming, fast and furious, facts be damned. The CFPB will be “powerful, hard-nosed and unaccountable,” warns Fred Barnes, executive editor of The Weekly Standard.

Warren’s wealthy critics are right to be nervous. And they have a right to speak out against her. But Bloomberg’s potential entry into the race — and Tom Steyer’s ongoing presence — shows that they’re not just giving an opinion. They want assurance that the Democratic nominee won’t be too disruptive. They want a restoration of the pre-Trump status quo, not a revolution. They want a veto of sorts, a formal way to say that Democrats can only go so far with their plans and policies.

The only response worth making to this idea is to laugh. Despite voter suppression, unlimited political spending and the president’s attempt to solicit foreign interference on his behalf, this is still a democracy. The final say still rests with voters, with ordinary Americans who retain the power to shape our government. And if those voters decide to nominate Warren or Sanders instead of a traditional moderate — and if either of those candidates beats Trump, as is very possible — then the billionaires will have to learn to live with the people’s will.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here's our email: letters@nytimes.com.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

Warren, Booker spar over wealth tax .
Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.) sparred early in Wednesday's Democratic presidential debate over Warren's signature wealth-tax proposal.Warren has proposed a 2 percent tax on net worth above $50 million and a 6 percent tax on net worth over $1 billion."Doing a wealth tax is not about punishing anyone," she said. "It's about saying, 'You built something great in this country? Good for you. But you did it using workers all of us helped pay to educate. You did it getting your goods on roads and bridges all of us helped pay for. You did it protected by police and firefighters all of us help pay the salaries for.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!