Opinion: My third impeachment is really different from the others (Opinion) - - PressFrom - US
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Opinion My third impeachment is really different from the others (Opinion)

16:50  13 november  2019
16:50  13 november  2019 Source:   cnn.com

Impeachment investigators subpoena Mick Mulvaney

  Impeachment investigators subpoena Mick Mulvaney Impeachment investigators subpoena Mick MulvaneyMulvaney had already signaled he would likely refuse lawmakers’ demands to testify, and the White House has issued a blanket order against cooperating with the impeachment probe.

Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body levels charges against a government official. Impeachment does not in itself remove the official definitively from office

Before those hearings get underway, we sat down with someone who’s unafraid to ask all the questions we’ve been too embarrassed to say out loud. These will be the first presidential impeachment hearings in more than two decades. Here’s how this inquiry is likely to be different from the last.

Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, Donald Trump are posing for a picture© Getty Images

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Over the past month or so I've been asked repeatedly how the Donald Trump impeachment process compared to President Bill Clinton's. The current situation has certainly stirred memories for me of 1998-99 when I worked in the White House, but it also reminded me of attending the Senate Watergate hearings as a teenager in the summer of 1973.

Nunes pressed on Fox News about comparing impeachment inquiry to a 'coup'

  Nunes pressed on Fox News about comparing impeachment inquiry to a 'coup' Fox's Ed Henry grilled House Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) Sunday on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's (R-Calif.) characterization of the House impeachment inquiry as a "coup," according to Mediaite."Is this a calculated coup against President Trump, and if so, how do you back that up?" Henry asked Nunes, with Nunes responding that the inquiry was "the cheap knockoff version of the Russia hoax.""It"Is this a calculated coup against President Trump, and if so, how do you back that up?" Henry asked Nunes, with Nunes responding that the inquiry was "the cheap knockoff version of the Russia hoax.

Others argue more aggressively that Democrats are twisting the facts to criminalize foreign policy out of animus for Mr. Trump. “It’s been really astonishing to me how corrupt it’s been. What is different from 1998, though, is that Mr. Clinton was in his second term and would never face voters

Impeachment Is Really Hard. On the other side of the brick wall, four women who lead the local chapter of the progressive group Indivisible were ordering salads and wraps at a recently opened restaurant that specializes in local fresh food.

My father was a producer for NBC News assigned to special events. He did things like plan coverage of political conventions, Olympics and space launches from Cape Canaveral. Because that took him away for long stretches, he'd often bring us kids along for the ride. In 1972, it was the political conventions in Miami Beach. In 1976, it was meeting Jimmy Carter in the NBC headquarters in Manchester, New Hampshire, on election night -- and then asking someone who he was. And in the summer of 1973, it was Washington, DC.

Because he was working all day and didn't have a child care plan for a 13-year-old, my father found a way to get me into the hearings. For three days, I watched White House aide John Ehrlichman testify from beginning to end. Even with the typical teenage attention span and no seat to sit in, it was gripping from beginning to end.

Giuliani pens op-ed slamming 'unprecedented' impeachment inquiry

  Giuliani pens op-ed slamming 'unprecedented' impeachment inquiry Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal attorney, penned an op-ed published Tuesday slamming the House's "unprecedented" impeachment investigation.The op-ed, which comes a day before the House holds its first public hearings in the inquiry, claims Trump's interactions with Ukraine were "innocent" and that House Democrats are unfairly targeting his client."The manner in which [Rep. Adam Schiff] and Speaker Nancy Pelosi are conducting this impeachment investigation is unprecedented, constitutionally questionable, and an affront to American fair play," Giuliani wrote in The Wall Street Journal.

This is the Impeachment Briefing, The Times’s newsletter about the impeachment investigation. Sign up here to get it in your inbox every weeknight. The next phase impeachment is set to begin at 10 a.m. Eastern on Wednesday, when investigators hold the first televised hearing of the inquiry.

Now we are faced with a brand new examination of potential presidential corruption involving President Trump. Public hearings will begin this week in Congress to attempt to figure out what happened and who, if anyone, is responsible. 1) America is in a much different place politically than it was during.

I tell this story because it highlights the biggest difference between the Trump impeachment and the ones of Clinton and Richard Nixon before him.

There are similarities between the three. All of them were designed to bring the evidence to life with real live witnesses telling the story. For Nixon, it was all his top aides, with John Dean becoming an overnight political hero labeling the Nixon administration a cancer on America.

With Clinton, it was Ken Starr, the independent counsel, testifying in vivid detail on all the evidence his grand juries collected from everyone involved in the matter. And this week, three American patriots will start to tell the story of corruption and abuse in the Trump administration.

The hearings were also partisan in nature, meaning all of them had representatives dedicated more to protecting the President, than getting to the truth. In Nixon, many laud the bipartisan nature of the Senate committee. While they were certainly more bipartisan than today, according to Scott Armstrong who was on the staff, Republicans on the committee regularly briefed the White House and coordinated strategy.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The public impeachment inquiry hearings this week usher in a rare and momentous occasion in American history as Congress That recalcitrance raises questions about how prepared the president is to comply with directives from the court — should they come — or to accept

Still, others may have the time to address impeachment in class but are avoiding the divisive topic because of how polarizing it can be, says Rwany Sibaja Teachers who have the time and choose to tackle impeachment told us they often have to start with the basics, like, "What is impeachment ?"

Democrats in 1998 worked closely with the White House to forge a joint defense of the President. And we all know today, members of the Republican party have gone to great lengths and used many explanations, some conflicting, on why the President's call was "perfect."

But that's where Trump's impeachment veers from the others.

First off, with Nixon there were only three television networks and no cable TV, and they covered the Senate hearings wall-to-wall for the first week. It was only later that they worked out a rotation among themselves.

With Clinton, there was cable TV and talk radio, but no real internet penetration. Trump is the first internet impeachment where people largely get their news from sources they agree with, rather than the booming voices of Walter Cronkite or Tom Brokaw.

What is really different is who's testifying. In Nixon's impeachment, all of his senior aides testified in public, on television before tens of millions of people. Many of them also went before the special prosecutor's grand jury and testified under oath. And, in a way, Nixon testified himself when the Supreme Court ordered the release of the Nixon tapes and we got to hear what was said behind closed doors.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

This third option — the one I prefer and that Democratic leaders seem to be pursuing — falls in between the two others . Given the current political polarization, I think impeachment is more likely to unite Republicans behind Trump. The process will inevitably focus the public on the actions of

Add Impeachment Inquiry as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Impeachment Inquiry news, video, and analysis from ABC News. This is a very different scenario from Clinton, whose job approval was in the mid-60s and less than one third of Americans at points believing he should be

With Clinton, Ken Starr had everyone that matters in front of the grand jury. From the President, to Monica Lewinsky and Linda Tripp to low-level aides, Secret Service and White House valets. He left no stone unturned and when he released his report and subsequently testified before Congress, the case was all there, with no loose ends.

The Trump impeachment is nothing like that. President Trump has not gone under oath in the matter of Ukraine. His top aides who allegedly facilitated the Ukraine cash-for-dirt operation also have not been interviewed. Mick Mulvaney, Rick Perry, Mike Pompeo and Rudy Giuliani all are missing in the evidence of the case against the President, by their choosing or that of the White House.

Now Republicans will argue that this makes the case all second-hand information and you can't impeach the President on this kind of evidence. Democrats argue they have more than enough evidence to impeach the President and they won't fall for the delaying tactics of all the President's men. The President could clear all this up with one phone call ordering his men to testify. He won't, and there is significant meaning in that.

But in comparing the impeachments, I'm left here with a sense we don't have the whole story. There is evidence we won't see until well after the impeachment process is done, perhaps even after the election in 2020.

We don't know how deep this goes, what other examples there may be of the same behavior and just how corrupt the President and his team are. There may well be enough to impeach him, but I do have a strong feeling that we don't know everything. And it's that lingering feeling that there's more to know which will gnaw at me as I watch up close my third presidential impeachment process.


Fox News Host Pleads With Trump Not to Tweet During Impeachment Hearings: 'It Ticks You Off' .
Just before the third day of public impeachment hearings, Fox and Friends host Brian Kilmeade asked Trump not to tweet during the hearings the way he did in the past.He noted that Trump has other issues to attend to. "There's so much for him to do," he said. Kilmeade said that Trump should just leave the hearings in the hands of the Representatives who are defending him. "Let these guys like Doug Collins and company fight it out and keep it on the straight and narrow from the Republican perspective," he said.

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