Opinion: Shaking down the rich is bad for democracy - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Opinion Shaking down the rich is bad for democracy

17:21  13 november  2019
17:21  13 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

Mega-rally marks Chile protests third week as president struggles

  Mega-rally marks Chile protests third week as president struggles Protesters in Chile clashed with police, looted stores and endured a strong earthquake at the close of a huge rally kicking off the third week of anti-government demonstrations that have sparked deadly unrest. Tens of thousands of people gathered in Plaza de Italia, the epicenter of the unrest over economic inequality and other woes, and tried to march on the presidential palace in downtown Santiago. Fights broke out with police trying to contain them, with officers firing water cannons and tear gas. One officer was hit in the face with a Molotov cocktail.People banged pots and pans and blared the horns of their cars as night fell in Santiago.

Warren sees the rich as a natural resource that can be mined for its wealth indefinitely. Well, we have a lot of examples of countries that depend on natural resources to pay When all of the money comes from the aristocracy, as it did prior to the rise of democratic capitalism, the aristocracy made the rules.

Bad for Democracy : How the Presidency Undermines the Power of the People (2008) is a non-fiction book written by Vanderbilt professor Dana D. Nelson. It is notable for its criticism of excessive presidential power and for her call for substantive political reform.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks at a town hall meeting at Waterfront Park in San Diego on Oct. 3.© K.C. Alfred/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks at a town hall meeting at Waterfront Park in San Diego on Oct. 3.

Forget whether the math works. (It doesn't.) Expecting billionaires to pay for all the nice things is bad for democracy.

One of the more exhausting rituals of presidential campaign season is the effort to make every new proposal "add up." Sure, it's better that politicians try to come up with a plan to pay for their wish lists. The problem is that the explanations are often a disguise that make the impossible seem possible, even practical. Fake budgets are the tribute that pandering pays to pragmatism.

Pro-Beijing lawmaker stabbed by 'fake fan' in HK

  Pro-Beijing lawmaker stabbed by 'fake fan' in HK A man approached Junius Ho with flowers before taking a knife out of his bag and stabbing him.In footage posted online, a man is seen approaching Junius Ho with flowers before reaching into a bag - saying he wants a picture - but instead lunging at Mr Ho with a knife.

Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except for all those other Democracy is the worst system and it’s been tested very short time. Democracy is one of the It also makes possible the separation of powers among branches and up-and- down along levels of

Soros Says Bush Is Worse . Inside One Man's Crusade to Change America. His Critics Say It's Bad for Democracy . Why is George Soros, the billionaire investor-philanthropist--famed for bringing down currencies and shaking communist regimes--appealing so assiduously to thoroughly

You could confiscate the wealth of every billionaire and centimillionaire in the country and it wouldn't come close to paying for Medicare for All or the Green New Deal.

But let's pretend that the fantastical (albeit unconstitutional) wealth tax Elizabeth Warren has proposed would work like she claims. Let's also stipulate that the wealthy wouldn't respond by hiding their wealth, moving out of the country or cutting back in the sort of investments the government is utterly incapable of replicating. Let's even concede for argument's sake that Warren could get her plan through Congress and the courts.

Would that be good for the country?

Warren sees the rich as a natural resource that can be mined for its wealth indefinitely. Well, we have a lot of examples of countries that depend on natural resources to pay for everything. Saudi Arabia comes to mind. Oil revenues pay for almost everything. The problem with such societies is what political scientists and economists call "the resource curse" or "the paradox of plenty."

Controversial Hong Kong lawmaker Junius Ho attacked in the street

  Controversial Hong Kong lawmaker Junius Ho attacked in the street A Hong Kong lawmaker known for his fierce criticism of ongoing anti-government protests in the city has been attacked in an apparent stabbing. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Video released by the Chinese state-run newspaper Global Times showed Junius Ho being attacked by a man while talking to members of the public in the Hong Kong district of Tuen Mun.

Is polling good or bad for democracy ? That question frames the article Jill Lepore recently wrote in The New Yorker, called "Politics And The New The parties would hire these thugs to go down there. Democratic thugs, you know, would beat up all the Republicans with their blue tickets and prevent

In some works democracy is bad . It is generally presented as an ineffectual form of government highly prone to corruption, demagoguery and takeovers by … In Methuselah's Children, the head of the democratic world government seriously considers sterilizing and/or executing every member of the

It works like this: When the government doesn't need the tax dollars of a middle class, the middle class has less political power. Virtually everywhere democracy has taken root, starting with England and Holland, it has done so because the middle class demanded representation in return for taxation. That was the heart of the whole "no taxation without representation" thing that led to the American Revolution.

The curse has an economic component as well. The countries that rely on natural resources tend to be poorer because they are less economically dynamic. Think resource-poor Switzerland versus resource-rich Venezuela. Exactly why this widely observed phenomenon works this way is debated, but part of it is surely that the existing stakeholders are hostile toward economic innovation. Another factor: When the state supports you, the incentive to support yourself -- never mind be an entrepreneur -- is dulled.

Iraq veteran: We defended American democracy. Now we're asking Congress to do the same.

  Iraq veteran: We defended American democracy. Now we're asking Congress to do the same. Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman and I took the same oath to serve America and the Constitution. And in Iraq, in October 2004, we bled on the same sand. I was shot in an ambush, fracturing both hips and herniating two discs in my lower back. That same month, Lt. Col. Vindman was wounded by a roadside bomb, earning him the Purple Heart he wore at his deposition last week — the same as the one I received.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Isn’t it bizarre that voting, our highest civic duty, boils down to an individual action performed in the But nobody is laughing now that it seems that many western democracies are in the process of Despite a number of notoriously bad outcomes, they have very often made democracy possible.

Heck, Democracy in practice is worse than any other form of governments including dictatorship except for two things. First is corruption. One good thing about democracy is we have a ceiling to how corrupted the government can get. Second is stability. The good times and bad times are limited and

But the more important part is the democratic disincentive. Think of the old golden rule: Whoever has the gold makes the rules. (This insight apparently comes from noted philosopher Johnny Hart, the cartoonist behind "The Wizard of Id," who coined it in 1965). When the bulk of tax revenues come from the people, or at least from the middle class, the government heeds the middle class. When all of the money comes from the aristocracy, as it did prior to the rise of democratic capitalism, the aristocracy made the rules. When it comes from the rich -- aka "the donor class," the "One Percent," etc. -- the rich care a lot more about the rule-making.

Today, the top 1 percent make roughly 20 percent of the money in this country and pay almost 40 percent of federal taxes. Meanwhile, 60 percent of U.S. households receive more money from the treasury than they pay into it. But Warren insists it's the rich who aren't paying "their fair share."

Is it any wonder that our political system is so heavily influenced by the top 1 percent? Is it any wonder that the top 1 percent feel so incentivized to get involved in politics? The more skin you have in the game, the more you care about the game.

The left used to understand this. For generations they opposed means-testing Social Security because they wanted it to be a broad American entitlement, not a form of welfare.

Americans are practical. When told that the rich can pay for cool stuff, they say "go for it." When asked if they want the cool stuff so badly that they'd be willing to pay more themselves, they're much stingier.

The danger of promising that the rich can pay for everything is multifaceted. First, it's not true. Second, you don't have to be a student of public choice theory to understand that the more Washington behaves as if it's true, the more the wealthy will intervene in our politics. And third, the more citizens believe that a small group of undeserving wealthy people are denying them nice things, the uglier our politics will become.

(Jonah Goldberg is editor-in-chief of The Dispatch and the host of The Remnant podcast. His Twitter handle is @JonahDispatch.)

'Crazy Rich Asians' Director Responds to Brenda Song Saying She Was Told She Wasn't 'Asian Enough' to Audition .
Jon M. Chu says that he would never make those comments about the actress.The Crazy Rich Asians director took to Twitter on Wednesday to respond to claims that Brenda Song was told she wasn't "Asian enough" to audition for the film.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 7
This is interesting!