•   
  •   
  •   

Opinion Obama must back Biden to restore his legacy

19:35  26 november  2019
19:35  26 november  2019 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Michelle Obama's new journal guides fans to write their own 'Becoming'

  Michelle Obama's new journal guides fans to write their own 'Becoming' The former first lady follows up her memoir "Becoming" with the release of a guided journal complete with writing prompts.Out nationwide on Tuesday, the guided journal, which includes more than 150 quotes and prompts (and even a "Becoming" playlist) from the former first lady, has already garnered a great deal of media attention, including being featured as a bonus pick on Oprah Winfrey’s coveted list of "Favorite Things.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a man standing in front of a group of people posing for the camera© Provided by Washington Examiner

As it turns out, governing with a pen and phone, instead of the consent of Congress, is a fairly easy way of guaranteeing that your first successor from an opposition party will undo your entire legacy.

For better or worse, President Trump pulled out of the Paris climate accords and the Iran Deal. He has moved to reverse the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy (the courts will settle that one), even though he failed to leverage it to gain a legislative win on immigration. He has realigned our axis of allies across the globe, abolished the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate, and seems keen to embark on year three of a trade war.

Buttigeg counterpunches as rivals take aim at his rising candidacy

  Buttigeg counterpunches as rivals take aim at his rising candidacy The Democratic presidential candidates debate Wednesday for the fifth time — and the first where Pete Buttigieg as a true frontrunner in the crowded race. © Alex Wong/Getty Images South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (left), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (center left), former Vice President Joe Biden (center right) and Sen. Bernie Sanders take the stage for the November debate. The South Bend, Indiana mayor has risen to the top in a flagship poll of first-in-the-nation Iowa. And there’s a four-way battle between Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens.

Trump has all but crushed the wide-eyed hope of Obama's neoliberal dream, leaving Democrats with no change and plenty of rage.

In 2016, Bernie Sanders ran as a rebuke to the Obama legacy from within the Democratic Party. This year, the main lanes of the presidential primary are doing so. One by one, Democratic candidates rejected the signature legislative achievement of Obama's career and embraced an unabashedly socialist "Medicare for all" plan.

Instead of doubling down on Obama's penchant for rhetorical care and a performance of unity, a primary dominated by three white septuagenarians has absurdly worshipped at the altar of identity politics and social justice, guided by unbridled revenge. Elizabeth Warren wants to punish wealth creators. Sanders wants to ban your private health insurance. Pete Buttigieg wants to pack the courts. Kamala Harris wants to steal your guns. Somehow, an Asian guy who wants to give everyone $1,000 a month has the least anti-capitalist and least insane signature policy in the entire primary.

Read the full text from the fifth Democratic debate

  Read the full text from the fifth Democratic debate Read the full text from the fifth debate for the 2020 presidential election hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post.ANNOUNCER: The MSNBC-Washington Post Democratic presidential debate, live from Atlanta, Georgia, and the Tyler Perry Studios. Here is Rachel Maddow.

In short, regardless of which party wins, Obama's legacy is one election away from vanishing completely. All that will remain of it are the photo-ops. But he can still save it by doing the one thing he's refused to do until now.

Obama must formally endorse Joe Biden.

Yes, there is a lazy pundit's theory that Biden's best day in the election would be his first, and for a brief moment, it looked as if it was coming to pass when Warren seized the lead from him. But consider this: The former vice president entered the race polling at close to 30%, with Sanders nearly ten points behind. Today, Biden is still right there, around 30%, in the national polls, with Sanders a little more than ten points behind, and Warren a little bit behind that. Despite facing a front-runner's fire, he's never sunk below 25% of the primary vote share. And every disingenuous attack thrown his way, including the insane notion that the vice president of a black president is insufficiently anti-racist and that the author of the Violence Against Women Act is secretly getting off on sniffing people's hair, has backfired spectacularly. (Harris, who was a double-digit candidate when she launched her racism charge at Biden, is now statistically tied with Andrew Yang.)

Here's the real Democratic debate: Which one can defeat Donald Trump?

  Here's the real Democratic debate: Which one can defeat Donald Trump? There are ideological differences in the presidential field, but what Democrats are really debating is: Which one can defeat Donald Trump?

With Warren on the wane, Biden and Sanders are at a deadlock. The only other candidate with a path to the double digits, Buttigieg, is just slightly to the left of Biden and capable of advancing the Obama agenda, but given his nonexistent support from black voters, his path to the nomination is probably impossible. Biden is the heir apparent to Obama's legacy, and it's time for Obama to step up and end the deadlock once and for all.

For starters, it looks like outright cowardice that Obama refuses to defend Biden from the entirely unfounded notion that he let his son's improper appointment to the board of Burisma Holdings affect his anti-corruption actions in Ukraine. It's high time for Obama to say that, although Hunter Biden was wrong to take the role at the Ukrainian oil company, it in no way swayed Biden's job in Ukraine.

But according to an aside in a new Politico magazine piece, Obama may actually be willing to take his support one step further.

"Publicly, he has been clear that he won’t intervene in the primary for or against a candidate, unless he believed there was some egregious attack," Ryan Lizza wrote. "There is one potential exception: Back when Sanders seemed like more of a threat than he does now, Obama said privately that if Bernie were running away with the nomination, Obama would speak up to stop him."

Sanders may not be running away with the nomination, but his base has held. If one quintile of the Democratic electorate refuses to budge, and the rest of the field remains divided, Sanders may have better staying power than any of his detractors want to admit.

The Biden-Sanders deadlock won't break on its own, and no figure commands more authority in the Democratic Party than Obama, arguably the most beloved president since Ronald Reagan. If Obama wants the Democratic nominee to be both a candidate who won't run rhetorically roughshod over his legacy and one who can actually beat Trump, his call of duty is obvious.

Biden launches Iowa trip with focus on Trump, rural America .
Joe Biden launched an eight-day bus tour of Iowa on Saturday projecting confidence, ignoring his many Democratic presidential competitors and pledging that he will unseat President Donald Trump in 2020. The former vice president pledged first to win the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses, despite recent polls suggesting his standing there has slipped in recent months. “I promise you, I promise you,” Biden told a few hundred supporters outside his Council Bluff campaign office, “we’re going to win this race, and we’re going to beat Donald Trump, and we’re going to change America.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!