Opinion: The Case for Bernie - - PressFrom - US
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Opinion The Case for Bernie

02:15  01 december  2019
02:15  01 december  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Bernie Sanders promises ‘high-speed internet for all’ through publicly-owned broadband service

  Bernie Sanders promises ‘high-speed internet for all’ through publicly-owned broadband service Sen. Bernie Sanders rolled out an ambitious plan Friday that would categorize internet service as a public utility as part of his 2020 presidential campaign. The proposal would provide $150 billion worth of grants and aid to help local governments build broadband internet infrastructure. Sanders’ plan also pledges to break up the large corporations that dominate internet and cable service.© Provided by Geekwire Sen. Bernie Sanders (Facebook Photo / Bernie Sanders) “High-speed internet service must be treated as the new electricity — a public utility that everyone deserves as a basic human right,” the proposal says.

The Democratic Party needs a nominee, but right now it has a train wreck instead. The front-runner seems too old for the job and is poised to lose the first two primary season contests. The woman who was supposed to become the front-runner on the basis of her policy chops is sliding in the polls after

The Democratic Party needs a nominee, but right now it has a train wreck instead. The front-runner seems too old for the job and is poised to lose the first two primary season contests. The woman who was supposed to become the front-runner on the basis of her policy chops is sliding in the polls after

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a man standing in front of a blue sky: Senator Bernie Sanders at an October campaign rally in Queens.© Christopher Lee for The New York Times Senator Bernie Sanders at an October campaign rally in Queens.

The Democratic Party needs a nominee, but right now it has a train wreck instead. The front-runner seems too old for the job and is poised to lose the first two primary season contests. The woman who was supposed to become the front-runner on the basis of her policy chops is sliding in the polls after thoroughly botching her health care strategy. The candidate rising in her place is a 37-year-old mayor of a tiny, not-obviously-thriving city.

Bernie Sanders condemns MLB proposal to cut 42 minor-league teams

  Bernie Sanders condemns MLB proposal to cut 42 minor-league teams United States Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is urging Major League Baseball and commissioner Rob Manfred against potentially cutting more than 40 minor-league teams. "I am writing to urge you and the owners of Major League Baseball franchises not to eliminate any of the 42 Minor League Baseball clubs that have been put on the chopping block," Sanders wrote in an open letter Monday. "Shutting down 25 percent of"I am writing to urge you and the owners of Major League Baseball franchises not to eliminate any of the 42 Minor League Baseball clubs that have been put on the chopping block," Sanders wrote in an open letter Monday.

So that brings us to Bernie Sanders. The self-described “democratic socialist” will coast to a primary victory Tuesday in the nation’s most “You could do worse than having Bernie Sanders in the White House,” he admitted. “The things that he would be able to direct in the White House would accord with

This is a no-brainer folks. He's the most popular politician in the country by a damn sight. Cenk Uygur, host of The Young Turks, breaks it down. Tell us

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Meanwhile several seemingly electable alternatives have failed to catch fire; the party establishment is casting about for other options; and not one but two billionaires are spending millions to try to buy delegates for a brokered convention … which is a not-entirely-unimaginable endgame for the party as it prepares to face down Donald Trump.

The state of the Democratic field reflects the weaknesses of the individual candidates, but it also reflects the heterogenous nature of the Democratic coalition, whose electorate has many more demographic divisions than the mostly white and middle-class and aging G.O.P., and therefore occasionally resembles the 19th-century Hapsburg empire in the challenge it poses to aspiring leaders.

Staffer who allegedly posted vulgar tweets no longer with Sanders' campaign

  Staffer who allegedly posted vulgar tweets no longer with Sanders' campaign A Sanders presidential campaign hire is no longer on staff after a series of decade-old vulgar tweets were reported.(MORE: Who's running for president in 2020?)

Bernie Sanders bluntly fails the Rick Perry test. In fact he pretty much defines what it means to fail that test. It isn’t just that he doesn’t kiss babies or comb Watching Bernie slog forward to an audience of political gatekeepers who wish he would stop being a bummer and just kiss more babies shames me

Political and social change emanates from persistent pressure for a just world, not settling for what is “realistic” before even getting to the negotiating table.

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The theory of the Kamala Harris candidacy, whose nosedive was the subject of a withering pre-mortem from three of my colleagues over Thanksgiving, was that she was well suited to accomplish this unification through the elixir of her female/minority/professional class identities — that she would embody the party’s diversity much as Barack Obama did before her, and subsume the party’s potential tensions under the benevolent stewardship of a multicultural managerialism.

That isn’t happening. But it’s still reasonable for Democratic voters to look for someone who can do a version of what Harris was supposed to do, and build a coalition across the party’s many axes of division.

And there’s an interesting case that the candidate best positioned to do this — the one whose support is most diverse right now — is the candidate whom Obama allegedly promised to intervene against if his nomination seemed likely: the resilient Socialist from Vermont, Bernie Sanders.

Sanders: Scripture calls for renewed focus on justice in US

  Sanders: Scripture calls for renewed focus on justice in US Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders says Scripture calls for a renewed focus on justice. He also tells a church congregation in Columbia, South Carolina, that the US needs “a nation and government that works for all of us, not just wealthy campaign contributors.” The Vermont senator also tells a church congregation in Columbia, South Carolina, that the United States needs “a nation and government that works for all of us, not just wealthy campaign contributors.

Photo: Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images. Hillary Clinton’s status as the Democratic front-runner is an exciting feminist moment on a symbolic level: a woman in the White House! In Clinton’s keynote speech at the Women in the World conference in April

Bernie Sanders can win--not just the primary, but the general. Democrats should back him, and ignore the arguments made by Barney Frank and others History has shown that any time there is a major national issue like slavery or civil rights, or in this case what I mentioned above, and one or both

Like other candidates, Sanders’s support has a demographic core: Just as Elizabeth Warren depends on very liberal professionals and Joe Biden on older minorities and moderates, Bernie depends intensely on the young. But his polling also shows an interesting better-than-you-expect pattern, given stereotypes about his support. He does better-than-you-expect with minorities despite having struggled with them in 2016, with moderate voters and $100K-plus earners despite being famously left-wing, and with young women despite all the BernieBro business.

This pattern explains why, in early-state polling, Sanders shows the most strength in very different environments — leading Warren everywhere in the latest FiveThirtyEight average, beating Biden in Iowa and challenging him in more-diverse Nevada, matching Pete Buttigieg in New Hampshire and leading him easily in South Carolina and California.

Now, I have stacked the argument slightly, and left out a crucial axis of division where Sanders does worse than you expect: He struggles badly with his fellow Social Security recipients, the over-65. This weakness and Biden’s strength with these same voters are obvious reasons to doubt the case for Bernie as the unifier, Bernie as the eventual nominee.

Bernie Sanders unveils plan to boost broadband access, break up internet and cable titans

  Bernie Sanders unveils plan to boost broadband access, break up internet and cable titans Sanders calls out companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon as he announces a sweeping plan to boost affordable broadband access.In his sprawling "High-Speed Internet for All" proposal, the Vermont senator and Democratic presidential candidate calls to treat internet like a public utility. His campaign argues that the internet should not be a "price gouging profit machine" for companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon.

My name is H. A. Goodman and I'm an author, columnist and journalist. This YouTube segment is inspired by my latest piece in The Huffington Post: 33 Percent

Political and social change emanate from persistent pressure for a just world, not settling for what is “realistic” before even getting to the negotiating table.

Especially since Sanders has thus far ignored my advice (I know, the nerve) that he reassure skeptics by telling them that he has a record as a dealmaker, that he can moderate on certain issues, so they can feel safe supporting him even if they aren’t ready for the revolution.

But still: If you are a wavering Democrat concerned about both party unity and ultimate electability, about exciting all the diverse factions of your base while also competing for the disaffected, both the relative breadth of Bernie’s primary coalition and his decent polling among non-voters and Obama-Trump voters are reasons to give him another look.

That decent polling, I suspect, reflects a sense among voters drawn to populism that Bernie is different from not only the more centrist candidates — latecomers Michael Bloomberg and Deval Patrick especially, but Buttigieg as well — but also from his fellow left-winger, Warren, who has fully embraced the culture-war breadth of the new progressivism while Sanders remains, fundamentally, an economic-policy monomaniac.

He’s still a social liberal, of course, and he isn’t in the culturally conservative/economic populist quadrant where so many unrepresented voters reside. But for the kind of American who is mostly with the Democrats on economics but wary of progressivism’s zest for culture war, Sanders’s socialism might be strangely reassuring — as a signal of what he actually cares about, and what battles he might eschew for the sake of his anti-plutocratic goals. (At the very least he’s no more radical on an issue like abortion than a studied moderate like Mayor Pete.)

Debate crowd erupts in laughs as Sanders chimes in 'I wrote the damn bill' on Medicare for All

  Debate crowd erupts in laughs as Sanders chimes in 'I wrote the damn bill' on Medicare for All Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) scored the first laugh of the fifth Democratic presidential debate on Wednesday by dredging up an old line: "I wrote the damn bill."Sanders first made the quip - a reference to his signature Medicare-for-All legislation - during the second Democratic primary debate in July after one of his rivals, Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), suggested that the Vermont senator was unaware of what the single-payer health care proposal actually entailed.Since then, Sanders has capitalized on that phrase, repeating it at times during public appearances and even selling campaign merchandise emblazoned with the slogan.

Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, at a news conference on Capitol Hill last December.Credit Sarah Silbiger/The New York Times. The case for Sanders. He’s consistently underrated for a reason: His agenda is more popular than many American elites understand.

The Libertarian Case for Bernie Sanders, from Will Wilkinson at the Niskanen Center. Yes, Denmark scores much above the US on ease of doing business indices. An interesting case . A welfare state is not necessarily a politicized regulatory state, with strong two-way political-industry capture.

This is why, despite technically preferring a moderate like Biden or Amy Klobuchar, I keep coming back to the conservative’s case for Bernie — which rests on the perhaps-wrong but still attractive supposition that he’s the liberal most likely to spend all his time trying to tax the rich and leave cultural conservatives alone.

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Bernie Sanders proposes $150 billion for public broadband improvements .
Bernie Sanders has unveiled his plan for US broadband if he wins the 2020 presidential election, and it won't surprise you to hear that his strategy would focus on making high-speed internet as widely accessible as possible. He intends to earmark $150 billion (as part of the Green New Deal) for infrastructure grants and technical help for "publicly owned and democratically controlled, co-operative or open access" broadband. He would also ensure free broadband in public housing and override state laws (frequently written by private ISPs) that block municipal internet.The candidate also vows to "dramatically" lower the cost of service.

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