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Opinion Opinions | New Hampshire just got more important for three contenders

19:05  05 february  2020
19:05  05 february  2020 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Sanders leads polls ahead of New Hampshire primary, while Buttigieg climbs and Biden nosedives

  Sanders leads polls ahead of New Hampshire primary, while Buttigieg climbs and Biden nosedives Pete Buttigieg has come under fire from both Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Vice President Biden as he has climbs in the polls.The polls show Buttigieg has growing support from New Hampshire voters while former Vice President Joe Biden has tumbled in recent Granite State polls.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a group of colorful items on a table: U.S. flags are for sale on Monmday in Concord, N.H., ahead of next week's New Hampshire primary.© Joseph Prezioso/Afp Via Getty Images U.S. flags are for sale on Monmday in Concord, N.H., ahead of next week's New Hampshire primary.

We may not have complete results in Iowa before the New Hampshire primary. Think about that for a moment, and you can appreciate the utter waste of time and money that candidates have expended. One result of the Iowa debacle is perhaps some added importance for the New Hampshire contest for three of the Democratic contenders.

Bernie Sanders' campaign defends narrow win in New Hampshire after big 2016 showing

  Bernie Sanders' campaign defends narrow win in New Hampshire after big 2016 showing Sen. Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire by fewer than two percentage points Tuesday. In 2016, he won the state by more than 22 percentage points.Sanders, I-Vt., ended up winning by fewer than two percentage points even though he was polling with a double-digit lead in one poll as recently as last week.

However prematurely and unfairly, the media likely will raise the stakes for both Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and former vice president Joe Biden. While Biden seems to have had the poorer outing in Iowa, he still has Nevada and South Carolina to fall back on where increased voter diversity should work in his favor. The situation is more dire for Warren, who is not favored to win either Nevada or South Carolina. If she cannot win in her own backyard, the pundits will question, where is she going to win?

Even more so, the decision point for Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) is drawing near. She put enormous resources, time and energy into Iowa and is so far a few points of the former vice president, but nevertheless remains far behind the two leaders. Does she stick in there, hoping that Biden continues to slide and that former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg loses his allure, or does she get out to endorse one of the moderates and perhaps set herself up as a vice-presidential contender?

Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary

  Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary Senator Bernie Sanders narrowly won the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday, consolidating support on the left and fending off a late charge by two moderate rivals.Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire's crucial Democratic primary, beating moderate rivals Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar in the race to challenge President Donald Trump for the White House, US networks projected. Sanders spoke to his supporters at the SNHU Field House in Manchester, N.H., on Feb. 11.

As for the top finishers (apparently) in Iowa — Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Buttigieg — it is far from clear whether New Hampshire, which is next door to Sanders’s home state, will make or break either of them. (Remember, Sanders clobbered Hillary Clinton in 2016 with 60 percent of the vote, so expectations are perhaps higher for him.) However, what they do not want to happen is to fall back into the pack, allowing Biden, Warren or Klobuchar to climb into the top tier.

Meanwhile, in light of the Iowa fiasco, former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg announced he was expanding his Super Tuesday spending spree. The Post reports that Bloomberg “authorized his advisers Tuesday morning to double television spending for his own presidential campaign, as his advisers have become more bullish on his odds of success. The increase represents a massive escalation of what is already the most costly campaign for the Democratic nomination in U.S. history. The campaign has also been authorized to hire more staff, said a person familiar with the strategy.” He announced that in California alone he will have 800 staffers.

First polls close in NH as Dems look for clarity in race

  First polls close in NH as Dems look for clarity in race MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — The first polls closed in New Hampshire Tuesday night as fiery progressive Bernie Sanders fought for Democratic front-runner status in the first-in-the-nation primary. The party hoped for results that would bring some clarity to a presidential nomination fight that has so far been marred by dysfunction and doubt. As Sanders predicted victory, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg hoped to seize the backing of his party'sAs Sanders predicted victory, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg hoped to seize the backing of his party's establishment with a strong finish. Joe Biden wanted to avert political disaster after leaving the state hours before polls began closing at 7 p.m. Most voting places were closing at 8 p.m.

Bloomberg is benefiting from two factors, aside from his near unlimited financial resources and the lack of clarity in the first contest. First, the rest of the field, by and large, is ignoring him, understandably wary of giving the multibillionaire too much attention. While the debate rules were changed for the Feb. 19 event to eliminate the donor requirement, there is no guarantee Bloomberg will qualify. His competitors might stop complaining that the rules were changed and start figuring out how to tackle him if he gets on stage. Second, as the other contenders bicker about the particulars of health care or fundraising techniques, Bloomberg is, in essence, already running a general election race against President Trump, through punches and insults and calling out his lawlessness. It is a reminder that, while Democrats insist they need an alternate message to beat Trump, they also need an effective combatant. Right now, Bloomberg is stepping up to fill that role.

In short, New Hampshire rather than Iowa may now play the winnowing role. Voters there will certainly be picking over the choices at town halls. However, in a party obsessed with electability, they may also have one eye on either national and other state polls for signs that Biden is slipping or losing African American support. Unless the former vice president can do well enough to maintain the argument that his best days will follow New Hampshire, he may not make it out of the Granite State.

Donald Trump mocks 'Impeachment King Steyer' and other Democrats after New Hampshire primary

  Donald Trump mocks 'Impeachment King Steyer' and other Democrats after New Hampshire primary President Donald Trump offered a rolling color commentary on the Democratic presidential field as election returns rolled in from New Hampshire.

Read more:

The Post’s View: The Iowa caucuses were already a ‘systemwide disaster’

Molly Roberts: The pitiful Iowa app is the least of our worries

Alexandra Petri: So I was at a caucus where they had some problems

Marc A. Thiessen: If you liked the Iowa caucuses, you’ll love Medicare-for-all

Jennifer Rubin: Real results, sort of: Yes, Iowa made it worse

George F. Will: Democrats’ carnival of unintended consequences

Democrats Get the Attention, but Trump Aims to Put New Hampshire in Play .
MANCHESTER, N.H. — In 2016, Donald J. Trump came within a few thousand votes of winning New Hampshire in the general election. This time around, fueled by a stockpile of donations, his campaign is looking at New Hampshire and its four electoral votes as a key target in its efforts to expand the map. There are some factors working in his favor. Instead of a feud with one of the Republican Party’s few female senators as well as a former governor, the president has the state party apparatus backing him. And his advisers think the policies he has implemented fit the contours of the state.

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