•   
  •   
  •   

Opinion Clarence Thomas, Living Proof of the American Dream

01:32  29 may  2020
01:32  29 may  2020 Source:   nationalreview.com

Michael Thomas clashes with DeVante Parker in heated Instagram exchange: 'Quit crying'

  Michael Thomas clashes with DeVante Parker in heated Instagram exchange: 'Quit crying' Thomas is no stranger to online fights.Thomas entered the fray after Parker responded to an "NFL on Fox" Instagram graphic asking whether it would be tougher to make a catch when guarded by Patriots cornerback Stephon Gilmore or break up a pass when covering Thomas. Parker picked the first, clearly proud of his eight-catch, 137-yard showing against Gilmore in December. He didn't mention Thomas in his response.

A new PBS documentary, Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words, probably won’t change that, but it will give anyone who watches it new Thomas is the kind of man who would be hailed as living proof of the American dream were his jurisprudence and political inclinations something other

Clarence Thomas is the second African- American U.S. Supreme Court Justice who served under One of the most infamous moments in Thomas 's career, which almost cost him his post, was when Struggling financially, his mother sent him and his brother to live with her father and stepmother in

Clarence Thomas wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas © Jonathan Ernst/Reuters Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE I n another era or a different political climate, Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas would be one of the most admired and acclaimed figures in American public life. Instead, he mostly flies under the radar, reviled by the Left and often underappreciated by the Right.

Dayton man arrested for role in ‘Diamond Cut’ drug trafficking ring sentenced to 60 months

  Dayton man arrested for role in ‘Diamond Cut’ drug trafficking ring sentenced to 60 months A Dayton man who pleaded guilty to being part of the Atlanta-to-Dayton drug trafficking ring “Diamond Cut” was sentenced in U.S. District Court Friday, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Ohio.   © Provided by Dayton Daily News Stock photo of drugs and drug paraphernalia. Levy Smith IV, 36, of Dayton, was sentenced to 72 months in prison. His sentence stems from a plea agreement, where he pleaded guilty to selling 83 grams of fentanyl for $6,ooo on May 28,2019, according to the release.

The American Dream is a national ethos of the United States, the set of ideals (democracy, rights, liberty, opportunity and equality) in which freedom includes the opportunity for prosperity and success

By the 1920s, Oklahoma was home to some 50 African- American towns, in addition to a large and prosperous black community living in the city of Tulsa.

A new PBS documentary, Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words, probably won’t change that, but it will give anyone who watches it new appreciation for his unbelievable success, a testament to what men are capable of. Thomas is the kind of man who would be hailed as living proof of the American dream were his jurisprudence and political inclinations something other than what they are.

The documentary is both a visual companion to Thomas’s 2007 memoir, My Grandfather’s Son, and a deeper insight into the thinking of a man who worked his way from abject poverty to a seat on the highest court in the country. The two-hour feature tracks his life chronologically, filling in stories from his book with pictures of his inauspicious beginnings in rural Georgia, his school days living with his grandparents in Savannah, his education, and his career.

How to Trump-splain #Obamagate: A hashtag in search of a scandal

  How to Trump-splain #Obamagate: A hashtag in search of a scandal As American deaths from the coronavirus approached 85,000, the largest outbreak in the world by far, President Donald Trump was playing, "I Know Something You Don't Know" with a newspaper reporter. "In one of your Mother's Day tweets," The Washington Post's Philip Rucker asked the president last week, "you appeared to accuse President Obama of' the biggest politicalAs American deaths from the coronavirus approached 85,000, the largest outbreak in the world by far, President Donald Trump was playing, "I Know Something You Don't Know" with a newspaper reporter.

Clarence Thomas testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sept. Why would someone from the impoverished inner city become the leading defender of the carceral state and American Thomas is at his most conservative in his arguments that the harsh punishments of the American

He also connected me with Thomas Huang, my PhD advisor who provided invaluable professional and personal guidance in my life, from advising on research to helping me adapt the new culture. Can you share “5 keys to achieving the American dream ” that others can learn from you?

These photos — and, later, video clips — are interspersed between long interview segments, in which Thomas sits alone at a table facing the camera head-on. The interviewer never appears on screen and only very occasionally interjects to ask a question. With this style, the documentary achieves an open, honest tone, approximating the raw vulnerability on display in My Grandfather’s Son.

Thomas’s unassuming charm comes through most when he makes himself chuckle, or, at times, give a great booming laugh, as a particular memory strikes him. Several of these moments come when he describes his grandfather, who, along with his grandmother, raised Clarence and his younger brother, Myers.

“Boys, the damn vacation is over,” Thomas remembers his grandfather saying when they came to live with their grandparents, after their mother gave up trying to raise them in the squalor of a tiny urban apartment in a city where blacks weren’t even permitted to walk through the center of the public park. His grandparents’ house in Savannah “could’ve been a palace,” he says, recalling that he and Myers flushed the toilet every time they walked by, amazed that it worked. They had never before been in a house with a bathtub.

Michael Wendler confesses to Pocher: "At first I thought Laura only wanted to go to bed with celebrities"

 Michael Wendler confesses to Pocher: © Getty Images Michael Wendler Michael Wendler and Oliver Pocher have a lot to confess in the new show "Pocher - dangerously honest" - also about getting to know your loved ones. Michael Wendler , 47, and Oliver Pocher , 42, are slowly mutating into the dream team of trash entertainment. The latest edition of "Pocher - dangerously honest" brought the former arguments back together and elicited one or two interesting statements from both of them. Of course, only alcohol was to blame.

Justice Clarence Thomas offers a monologue of self-justification in a talking-head memoir that's I’m an ordinary politically inclined American . I mean, how could you not talk about it — ever? But more than two years into the #MeToo revolution, the meaning of the Clarence Thomas /Anita Hill Senate

“The Journal of the American Medical Association has performed a service for reasonable people and reason. … Orlando Patterson’s review of Corey Robin’s argument against Clarence Thomas ’s fundamental position Thomas says that such approaches are demeaning and worsen their condition.

To hear these stories from the mouth of a man who now sits on the Supreme Court is almost unbelievable, and they add color to what Thomas’s memoir already outlined: a childhood that, at root, created a man who would one day be a justice. These anecdotes help bring Thomas’s character into focus, but the documentary’s chief success is in illuminating how his life — so distinct from that of the typical politician, federal judge, or Supreme Court justice — has informed his judicial philosophy.

The theme at the core of the feature is his resilience, his refusal to believe something or do something simply because some people expect a black man to think or act a certain way. It is clear that his choices were always informed by a lifelong search for deeper meaning, a desire for a fundamental understanding of truth and justice to which he could dedicate himself and his work.

This quest took the form, first, of his time in a Catholic seminary during high-school. During college and law school, he turned to black radicalism, enraged by the injustices he witnessed and experienced. As he matured and learned from his legal work, his thinking departed from left-wing ideology, contradicting what a black man is “supposed” to believe. It led him to do what he once believed was unthinkable and vote for Ronald Reagan in 1980 before going to work in the Reagan administration. Finally, he was shaped by deep study of America’s Founding principles and forged into iron by the injustices he suffered at the hands of those who opposed his Supreme Court confirmation.

Joe Biden gives black voters a choice: serve as toy soldiers or become traitors

  Joe Biden gives black voters a choice: serve as toy soldiers or become traitors The Democratic Party has long enjoyed the support of African American voters — support that presidential candidate Joe Biden now seems to be taking for granted. In an interview with Charlamagne Tha God, host of The Breakfast Club, on Thursday morning, Biden claimed that the choice black voters will face at the ballot box this November isn’t really a choice at all. And then he said the quiet part out loud."If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you ain't black," Biden said. So this happened... “If you got a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or for Trump then you ain’t Black.

On July 1, 1991, President George H. W. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court of the United States to replace Thurgood Marshall, who had announced his retirement. The nomination proceedings were contentious from the start, especially over the issue of abortion

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., June 6, 2016 (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters). Robin’s previous book, The Reactionary Mind, argued that the conservative political tendency has since Burke been used to justify the advantage of the stronger.

The result is the man sitting on the court today, who has a solid, informed view of the Constitution and an unshakable insistence on doing his job as well as he can, guided by and dedicated to what believes is right, regardless of the consequences.

“For what will you die?” Thomas asks rhetorically. “Is there something in life you will die for?” In the natural-law principles undergirding the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, Thomas found his answer. Discussing this, his eyes light up, and he becomes more animated than at any other point in the interviews.

“I was always looking for a set of ideals that fundamentally, at its core, said slavery is wrong,” he says. Natural law satisfied that demand, and his steadfast pursuit of originalist jurisprudence is the fruit of his having been convinced that our nation’s Founding philosophy defends human freedom and equality.

His interest in the natural law became a flashpoint when President George H. W. Bush nominated him to become only the second African-American Supreme Court justice in history, replacing the first, Thurgood Marshall. Democratic senators, fearful that Thomas would rule against Roe v. Wade and legal abortion, used his view of natural law as a pretext to oppose him.

The documentary shows footage of the hearing, including Joe Biden — then a senator from Delaware and chairman of the Judiciary Committee — attempting to prod Thomas on the supposedly sinister meaning of his natural-law beliefs. In one of his wriest moments, Thomas says of the experience, “One of the things you do in a hearing is you have to sit there and look attentively at people you know have no idea what they’re talking about.”

Cal Thomas: Name-calling

  Cal Thomas: Name-calling Writing and making public one’s opinions guarantees people will respond. Writers, performers and every human likely desire his or her thoughts, and even their life, to matter to others. The alternative is to become hermits. Like other opinion writers I get my share of positive and negative letters, but during the Trump administration the level of invective for those questioning anything the president says seems to have become more intense. President Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi are in a verbal battle that resembles schoolyard behavior I recall as a child: “Your mother wears combat boots,” said one kid. “Oh yeah, well your mother is (something I can’t print).

He isn’t afraid to be blunt, saying that opponents of his nomination believed he was “the wrong black guy.” Later, discussing the outright racism against him in the press and the treatment he received from Democrats during the Anita Hill hearing, he says, “If you criticize a black person who’s more liberal, you’re racist. But you can do whatever to me, or now to Ben Carson, and that’s fine. We’re not really black, because we’re not doing what they expect black people to do.”

For the viewer, it might bring to mind a recent comment from Biden himself, who told an African-American host in an interview, “If you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black.” New York Times writer Nikole Hannah-Jones defended Biden obliquely on Twitter, insisting that there’s “a difference between being politically black and racially black.”

The documentary captures Thomas’s thoughts on this sort of identity-politics game, to which liberals have subjected him for decades, in the discussion of his confirmation hearing. “[Democratic senators] refused to believe you had not discussed Roe v. Wade,” the interviewer says.

“Well, you know what, they refused to believe a lot of things, and isn’t that fascinating,” he says.

I have to have discussed [Roe] because they wanted me to have discussed it. It goes back to the thing about affirmative action. You have to believe in affirmative action, because we think you ought to believe in affirmative action. Well how is that different from slavery? How is that different from segregation? How is that different from being told you can’t walk across that park? You know what, I prefer to be excluded from the park, because I can live my life quite freely without setting foot in a park, but you can’t live it freely without having your own thoughts.”

Thomas Dutronc gives news of his mother Françoise Hardy

 Thomas Dutronc gives news of his mother Françoise Hardy © Sipa Thomas Dutronc gives news of his mother Françoise Hardy What becomes of Françoise Hardy? Her son Thomas Dutronc gave his news while she has spent the past few years battling cancer. Let the fans reassure themselves, the singer is fine. Thomas Dutronc is a very worried son . It must be said that in recent years has been very difficult for his mother, Françoise Hardy . After suffered from lymphoma, the singer was affected by pharynx cancer.

As the documentary closes, Thomas turns back to his grandfather, who died while their relationship was strained, one of the justice’s foremost regrets. “I want to be able to say to him, ‘I lived up to my oath, and I did my best,’” he says. “I want to be able to say that it’s a job well done.”

In brief shots of his office, a few things are immediately visible: a portrait of Frederick Douglass behind his desk, a bust of his grandfather on top of his bookcase, an American flag in the corner, and a crucifix on the wall. It is a neat summation of who he is, what he believes, and why he sits where he does today — a justice not for himself, for the sake of power or to impose his own ideology, but in service of a higher purpose and a greater good.

More on National Review

  • Liability Protection amid the Uncertainty and Risks of COVID-19
  • Respectfully Dissenting from Judge Luttig on Flynn Mandamus
  • Ending Abortion of Down-Syndrome Children in the United Kingdom

Châteauroux would have rejected a Franco-American purchase offer .
© Supplied by Sofoot Châteauroux would have rejected a Franco-American purchase offer Châteauroux does not taste the American dream. According to France Bleu Berry, the Franco-American businessman Ravy Truchot, owner of Thonon-Évian Grand Genève FC and FC Miami City, saw his offer to buy the Châteauroux club rejected this Sunday by the management of Castelroussine. “We received a communication from the club saying that our offer was rejected. Without explanations, without communication.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 3
This is interesting!