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Opinion COVID-19 Lawsuits Expose Our Unacceptable Status Quo on Abortion

14:11  29 may  2020
14:11  29 may  2020 Source:   nationalreview.com

Jane Roe’s Deathbed Confession: Anti-Abortion Conversion ‘All an Act’ Paid for by the Christian Right

  Jane Roe’s Deathbed Confession: Anti-Abortion Conversion ‘All an Act’ Paid for by the Christian Right In its final 20 minutes, the documentary film AKA Jane Roe delivers quite the blow to conservatives who have weaponized the story of Jane Roe herself—real name, Norma McCorvey—to argue that people with uteruses should have to carry any and all pregnancies to term. McCorvey, who died in 2017, became Jane Roe when, as a young homeless woman, she was unable to get a legal or safe abortion in the state of Texas. Her willingness to lend her experience to the legal case for abortion led to the passing of Roe v.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE I s there an unimpeachable right to abortion somewhere in the Constitution? Should abortion policy be left up to each state’s discretion? Does the 14th Amendment give government the power to ban abortion? Is legal abortion incompatible with the principles of the Declaration of Independence?

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: A demonstrator holds an abortion flag outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as justices hear a major abortion case on the legality of a Louisiana law that imposes restrictions on abortion doctors, March 4, 2020. © Tom Brenner/Reuters A demonstrator holds an abortion flag outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as justices hear a major abortion case on the legality of a Louisiana law that imposes restrictions on abortion doctors, March 4, 2020.

These arguments are endlessly complex and highly contentious. But if you spend any time observing our public debates over abortion, you’ll notice that these topics are rarely addressed.

Film: 'Roe' plaintiff says her anti-abortion switch was act

  Film: 'Roe' plaintiff says her anti-abortion switch was act WASHINGTON (AP) — Norma McCorvey loved the limelight. Better known as “Jane Roe,” her story was at the center of the 1973 Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade that legalized abortion nationwide. WASHINGTON (AP) — Norma McCorvey loved the limelight. Better known as “Jane Roe,” her story was at the center of the 1973 Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade that legalized abortion nationwide. At first she was an abortion rights advocate, but, in a twist, she became a born-again Christian in 1995 and switched sides.

Instead, political fights over abortion policy feature two arguments that seem not to respond to one another. There are those who recognize the humanity of the unborn child and argue that our political system should protect his right to life just as it does yours or mine. And there are those who rest their case for a right to abortion at the feet of Supreme Court precedent, implicitly arguing that Roe v. Wade has removed the need for them to justify abortion itself.

To be sure, many thinkers indulge in philosophical discussions about the ethical questions at stake in abortion. But in policy fights, legal-abortion supporters almost never defend abortion qua abortion. They don’t admit that abortion is killing and justify its legality anyway; they don’t explain why we should privilege one person’s bodily autonomy over another’s autonomy and right to life.

Father of Boston College DT leaves hospital after 50-day battle with COVID-19

  Father of Boston College DT leaves hospital after 50-day battle with COVID-19 Boston College’s football team’s Twitter account shared a great video on Thursday after the father of DT Ryan Betro was released from the hospital after a long battle with COVID-19. Dicky Betro, the father of defensive tackle Ryan Betro spent 50 days battling COVID-19, according to his son. Betro shared on Twitter that his father overcame pneumonia, kidney failure and fevers.Check out the cheering and applause the elder Betro received upon being released from the hospital: Thought that everyone could use a little positive news in their lives. My dad has been battling covid for 50 days.

Instead, they cloak their views with euphemisms such as “women’s rights” and “reproductive freedom” and, when challenged, retreat to the comfortable ground of proclaiming Roe “the law of the land.” The legal battles over abortion during the COVID-19 outbreak illustrate the fundamental problem with this status quo, which ensures that the acrimonious debate will stretch on interminably absent major changes.

Since March, several states have included surgical abortion among the many elective procedures halted during the pandemic, aiming to limit the spread of disease and conserve medical resources. Abortion-advocacy groups have hauled these states to court, insisting that a health-care crisis is not sufficient reason to abridge a so-called constitutional right. In one of the most egregious examples, the American Civil Liberties Union sued Arkansas for requiring women to test negative for COVID-19 prior to having an abortion.

Amazon employees behind Kindle, Echo now working on COVID-19 testing technology

  Amazon employees behind Kindle, Echo now working on COVID-19 testing technology On Monday, GeekWire reported that the team behind the creation of Amazon's Kindle e-reader and Echo speakers is now working on developing COVID-19 testing. Currently, Amazon is working with existing labs to process COVID-19 tests done by their workers; however, last week, Bloomberg reported that self-administered test "samples may fly in Amazon cargo jets to a lab the company is setting up" in northern Kentucky.Like Apple, Google, and a handful of other tech giants, Amazon is refocusing some of its hardware development teams to create tools that support the health industry in their fight against COVID-19.

In short, abortion advocates and their allies argue, Roe and subsequent jurisprudence mean that states may not, for any reason, restrict a woman’s ability to obtain an elective abortion at any stage of pregnancy. By and large, federal judges have agreed with them, prohibiting states from limiting abortion as one of many nonessential procedures.

This pandemic has underscored a problem that already existed, exposing not only the insatiable greed of the abortion lobby but also the way in which U.S. abortion jurisprudence has established an unworkable system for adjudicating these disputes. When the Supreme Court in Roe manufactured a right to abortion, it gave judges the power to impose a nakedly political decision on the entire nation, including states that correctly view the ruling as a hijacking of the Constitution. As a result, supporters of abortion can avoid defending their views before the public and instead demand that judges handicap their opponents.

The anti-constitutional decision in Roe, bolstered by subsequent rulings, has allowed proponents of unlimited abortion to hang their hat on precedent — or “super-precedent,” as they would have it — rather than on their preferred policy. But those who cry precedent on Roe are the same voices lobbying the Court to overturn less favorable rulings, such as Heller or Citizens United. It is not precedent they defend but the status quo that one particular precedent created.

Coronavirus: a baby died of Covid-19 in Switzerland

 Coronavirus: a baby died of Covid-19 in Switzerland He is the first victim of this age in Switzerland. © LP / Jean-Baptiste Quentin Le Parisien For the first time since the start of the Covid-19 epidemic, an infant died of the disease in Switzerland, after being infected abroad, announced the Ministry of Health Friday. "This death does not concern a schoolboy, it is an infant who died", in the canton of Aargau in the north of the country, said a representative of the Federal Office of Public Health, Stefan Kuster, at during a press conference.

Meanwhile, the American people are content to believe that Roe legalized abortion only in the first three months of pregnancy and that states may regulate the procedure thereafter. Such a status quo would comport with what a majority of Americans want, but it is not the landscape that Roe created. If it were, states would not be losing the battle to limit elective abortion during a global pandemic.

Relatively few know that Roe’s misinterpretation of the Constitution — combined with Doe v. Bolton’s loophole for maternal health — permits abortion on demand through all nine months of pregnancy. Even fewer realize that these flawed decisions enable judges to block pro-life policies that most Americans support.

The moral and political question of abortion has starkly divided us for more than half a century, and it cries out for a just solution. To the extent that we have not achieved one, it is because flawed jurisprudence enables abortion advocates to dodge the debate while preventing abortion opponents from doing anything to alter the status quo.

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'Clinics will be forced to close': Abortion rights backers fearful of upcoming Supreme Court ruling .
A Louisiana law in question requires clinic doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles.At the heart of the case is a Louisiana law, Act 620, that requires doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the clinic. If the law is upheld, a district court found that Louisiana would be left with one abortion clinic to serve the nearly 10,000 women who seek abortions in the state annually.

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