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Opinion Trump’s Version of the Suburbs Is a Lie

14:36  31 july  2020
14:36  31 july  2020 Source:   theatlantic.com

Biden Wouldn't 'Abolish' the Suburbs. He'd Give Them a Lift

  Biden Wouldn't 'Abolish' the Suburbs. He'd Give Them a Lift Policies that are more inclusive should be a boon to areas outside big cities, the Midwest and to manufacturing.Cities such as New York, Chicago and Los Angeles are losing population. The pandemic has hollowed out the parts of cities where knowledge workers live and work. And as presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden rolls out his economic agenda, it's clear that its priorities are other than on major cities. A Biden economy will likely mean cities have less economic and political clout four years from now than they do today.

Another reason is that when Trump talks about suburbs , he sounds like someone who has not had a suburbs -related life experience since watching Back to the Future in 1985. The Suburban Housewives of America must read this article. Biden will destroy your neighborhood and your American Dream.

President Donald Trump ' s racially charged warnings to suburban voters about crime and housing face a fundamental headwind: the suburbs In contrast to the stereotype of homogenous communities of White families behind white picket fences, in many of the largest suburban counties around America

President Donald Trump is rarely subtle with his racist dog-whistling, and his latest appeal to suburban voters is no different. On Wednesday, Trump tweeted, “I am happy to inform all of the people living their Suburban Lifestyle Dream that you will no longer be bothered or financially hurt by having low income housing built in your neighborhood.” He continued, “Your housing prices will go up based on the market, and crime will go down. I have rescinded the Obama-Biden AFFH Rule. Enjoy!” Trump was referring to an Obama-era law regarding the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing provision, which seeks to reduce racial segregation in the suburbs.

Trump administration ends Obama fair housing rule

  Trump administration ends Obama fair housing rule The Trump administration on Thursday repealed an Obama administration rule meant to combat housing discrimination that President Trump has cited as he portrays presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden as a threat to suburban voters.The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced it was replacing the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule implemented in 2015 with its own policy, dubbed Preserving Community and Neighborhood Choice.

President Trump ’ s latest campaign ads warn of left-wing mobs destroying American cities. His recent White House comments have depicted a rampage of The scale of urban violence and the threats to that suburban lifestyle are a faint echo of that time. And while polling shows that suburban voters

Donald Trump has been accused of pandering to racists after he rescinded an Obama-era anti-discrimination rule so as to save people’ s “ suburban lifestyle dream” from low-income housing. The policy change was met with instant criticism from his opponents.

a group of people standing in front of a building: The original “suburbs” were seen as dens of iniquity, not the placid avatars of decency as in the Trumpian imagination. © Camerique Archive / Getty The original “suburbs” were seen as dens of iniquity, not the placid avatars of decency as in the Trumpian imagination.

This declaration follows a tweet last week in which Trump shared a New York Post op-ed by the former New York lieutenant governor Betsy McCaughey, arguing that presidential challenger Joe Biden’s proposed housing policies threaten the “value of their new home, the size of their property tax bill and the character of the town they now call home.” Trump proclaimed, “The Suburban Housewives of America must read this article. Biden will destroy your neighborhood and your American Dream. I will preserve it, and make it even better!”

The political play here is not hard to decipher. Trump feels he needs to portray “the suburbs” as under an imminent threat to provoke racist fears among white voters. That threat, he implies, would come about from the diversification of neighborhoods encouraged by the Fair Housing Act, the provisions of which Biden has pledged to expand. And by couching the issue in terms of “the Suburban Lifestyle Dream,” Trump plays into a caricature of an idealized homogenous past, a white-bread Leave It to Beaver image of 1950s suburbia. That image was always a lie, but it is instructive to see how the very words suburb and suburban have served historically as a kind of palette for painting racial, ethnic, and economic divisions on the American landscape.

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Here’s what you need to know Trump plays on racist fears of the suburbs under siege as he courts white voters. Why the president’s blunt appeals to suburban voters may not work. Yet Mr. Trump ’ s avoidance of celebrations of high-profile figures who criticized him publicly is

The fact that the suburban population reflects the overall diversity of the country means absolutely nothing to the political left. Segregation is not something that exists in the United States. We threw it out with Jim Crow. People are fleeing to the suburbs , and want the suburbs to remain the suburbs

Ironically enough, the original “suburbs” were seen as dens of iniquity, not the placid avatars of decency as in the Trumpian imagination. The word suburb goes back to medieval times, when it developed a highly pejorative connotation to refer to areas outside the walls of London or other cities, where unseemly institutions—gambling holes, bordellos, slaughterhouses, and the like—were relegated. As the Oxford English Dictionary puts it, the words suburb and suburban early on were associated with “immoral or licentious practices.” In the 17th century, expressions such as suburb lechery and suburb sinner (meaning a prostitute) were common.

For Londoners, the “suburbs” didn’t start becoming more reputable until the early 19th century, when upwardly mobile city dwellers began to move to houses in the surrounding semirural regions. With the arrival of these social strivers, suburb and suburban began developing new associations of respectability, though that respectability was often portrayed as close-minded and complacent.

Suburban Americans should reject Trump's regressive housing offerings

  Suburban Americans should reject Trump's regressive housing offerings America's suburbs are grappling with their racist pasts, not trying to return to them. That is why more than 700 people participated in the inauguration of ERASE Racism's region-wide public initiative, "How Do We Build a Just Long Island?" That is why thousands, even in the suburbs, have been marching and demonstrating in support of Black lives and against structural racism.Many local leaders know that Long Island's economic future depends on attracting a diverse workforce and preparing its students for a diverse workplace.

President Donald Trump echoed recent claims that Democrats want to "abolish the suburbs ," while speaking in Midland, Texas on Wednesday. You are using an older browser version . Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

President Donald Trump echoed recent claims that Democrats want to "abolish the suburbs ," while speaking You are using an older browser version . Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience. UP NEXT. NOW PLAYING: Trending. Trump : Democrats want to 'abolish the suburbs '.

The view of suburbia as characterized by homogeneity and monotony became even more pronounced in the United States after World War II. As Ian Bogost recently observed in The Atlantic, the scorn toward suburbia was illustrated throughout popular culture, as in the 1962 Malvina Reynolds song “Little Boxes,” about the cookie-cutter nature of suburban housing developments: “Little boxes on the hillside / Little boxes made of ticky-tacky / Little boxes on the hillside / Little boxes all the same.” (The song was repopularized in the late 2000s as the theme music for Weeds, the TV series about a white suburban mom selling pot.)

The homogeneous appearance of the American suburbs stood in stark contrast to the diverse cityscapes and their significant populations of people of color. The “white flight” phenomenon that populated the suburbs encouraged a view of them as a kind of refuge from the big, bad cities. But as the journalist Eugene Scott recently argued in The Washington Post, whatever racial and ethnic homogeneity the suburbs may have had in the past has been decidedly transformed. And the economic picture is shifting too, as suburban regions become home to more and more low-income residents.

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Democrats have started calling out President Trump for both his "racist" tweet about suburbs and for assuming suburban dwellers are " as racist and elitist The President is openly endorsing segregation. And somehow he thinks so little of the American people, he assumes everyone is as racist and elitist

President Trump painted a false picture of suburbs under siege, saying he was protecting them from “Turning Americans against each other with total lies is unacceptable for a commander-in-chief at any Mr. Trump ’ s view of the makeup of the American suburbs also appears to be frozen in time.

For Trump’s dog-whistling to work, however, all of this complex demographic history must be erased in favor of a simplistic view of “the suburbs” as a safe harbor from whatever chaos is imagined to be filling city streets these days, as protests against police brutality continue. It is a worldview predicated on the bluntest kind of “There goes the neighborhood” perspective on the racial diversification of suburban communities. That diversification becomes Trumpified into an existential threat to “your neighborhood and your American Dream,” and anxious white voters are the obvious addressees of this message.

But Trump’s racist rhetoric is a mismatch for our current political situation, since polls show that suburbanites have not been supportive of the administration’s handling of the Black Lives Matter protests and race relations in general. In Portland, Oregon, images of the “Wall of Moms” facing down tear gas complicate any tidy racial dichotomization of the type Trump seeks to promulgate. And on Election Day, the reality of those living “the Suburban Lifestyle Dream” may put an end to Trump’s “suburban” fiction.

Manhattan apartment sales plunge while deals in the suburbs boom .
Pending home sales for apartments in Manhattan plunged by more than half last month, while deals for homes in the New York suburbs surged. © Scott Heins/Getty Images A rent-regulated apartment building in the West Village neighborhood on July 29, 2020 in New York City. Since the onset of the Coronavirus crisis, millions of Americans have fallen behind on rent payments, leading many to speculate that an eviction crisis and drastic rise in homelessness is inevitable unless drastic action is taken by state and federal lawmakers.

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