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Opinion The 1619 Project is a fraud

23:37  21 september  2020
23:37  21 september  2020 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

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The 1619 Project is an ongoing project developed by The New York Times Magazine in 2019 which "aims to reframe the country’s history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of

In August of 1619 , a ship appeared on this horizon, near Point Comfort, a coastal port in the English colony of Virginia. It carried more than 20 enslaved Africans, who were sold to the colonists. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the years of slavery that followed.

New York Times magazine staffer Nicole Hannah-Jones accused me once of rank jealousy. She said my criticism for her flawed 1619 Project stemmed from the fact that, unlike her, I do not “have good ideas and the talent to execute them.”

a close up of a newspaper © Provided by Washington Examiner

We apparently have different understandings of what constitutes a “good idea” and “talent.”

New York Times magazine editors have quietly removed controversial language from the online version of Hannah-Jones’s 1619 Project, a package of essays that argued that chattel slavery defines America’s founding. Hannah-Jones herself also asserts now that the project’s core thesis is not what she and everyone else involved originally said it was.

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Your obsession with 1619 project is unhealthy and comes from a very dark place. With every tweet, statement, interview, and article, you confirm that The 1619 Project has been controversial since day one, its publication eliciting condemnation by historians who pointed out its missteps on “matters of

The Times has in recent years forthrightly acknowledged that Duranty was a fraud . As the movie makes clear — and in this it is true In our time, the New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones has been celebrated as the genius behind the Times‘s 1619 Project , which is an attempt to — in the

It “does not argue that 1619 is our true founding," she said on Sept. 18. She declared elsewhere in July that it “doesn’t argue, for obvious reasons, that 1619 is our true founding.”

This is a brazen lie. When the 1619 Project debuted both online and in print in August 2019, the online version’s text stated originally [emphasis added]:

The 1619 project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.

That same online passage, which was the source of so much controversy among historians on both sides of the aisle, now reads:

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Because the 1619 Project insists that the US was founded for the purpose of entrenching slavery and that to this day, this nation is dominated by this legacy. Most significantly, the 1619 Project is designed to contaminate the tradition and foundation that underpins the American way of life.

The Times is all in on the 1619 Project despite the wide array of serious criticism. When forced to choose between facts that buttress a more positive It’s worth reading in full, but here’s the short version: William Tillman, a free black man, was a steward on the Union schooner S.J. Waring, when

The 1619 Project is an ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began in August 2019, the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.

There is no editor’s note explaining this revision or correction. And in case there is any doubt as to the meaning of the pre-amended language of the online version, consider the print edition contains the following passage [emphasis added]:

In August of 1619, a ship appeared on this horizon, near Point Comfort, a coastal port in the British colony of Virginia. It carried more than 20 enslaved Africans, who were sold to the colonists. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.

The online version of that exact passage, however, reads slightly differently:

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The fact that the 1619 Project is now being editorially defended in the AHR, despite the withering criticisms of highly respected professional historians, is a very troubling development. It reveals the extent to which racialist mythology, which has provided the “theoretical” foundation of middle-class

The only Pulitzer the 1619 Project deserved was for fiction. But to assert, on the basis of zero historical evidence, that its very foundational motivation was the persecution of those minorities is a conscious effort not to provoke academic debate but to inculcate the entire country, its people and its

In August of 1619, a ship appeared on this horizon, near Point Comfort, a coastal port in the English colony of Virginia. It carried more than 20 enslaved Africans, who were sold to the colonists. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the years of slavery that followed.

The online revisions were discovered this weekend at around the same time that Hannah-Jones claimed on CNN that her brainchild never suggested that 1619 is the date of America's founding. The project, she said, “does not argue that 1776 was not the founding of the country, but what it does argue for is that we have largely treated slavery as an asterisk to the American story.”

Again, this is a bald-faced lie. Along with both the online and print editions, Hannah-Jones herself said on social media at the time of 1619’s launch, “I argue that 1619 is our true founding.” She added, “Also, look at the banner pic in my profile.”

Yes, look:

a screenshot of a cell phone: Twitter © Provided by Washington Examiner Twitter

“[W]e are talking the founding of America,” she said elsewhere. “And that is 1619.”

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The 1619 Project has not been presented as the views of individual writers — views that in some cases, as on the supposed direct This is an important discussion to have, and we are eager to see it continue. To that end, we are planning to host public conversations next year among academics with

creator of “ The 1619 Project ” will serve as an additional selling point as the Times and the Pulitzer Center (unaffiliated with the prize) seek to market their 1619 Project Curriculum. Historians do argue over interpretations, but parts of the 1619 Project are sloppy, at best, with the facts.

There is more.

In an interview published in Jan. 2020, Hannah-Jones said, “I certainly expected there’d be conservative pushback to this reframing of this idea that 1619 is our true founding, no one is more American than black folks, that we are perfecters of democracy.”

The New York Times magazine said in an Aug. 2019 newsletter, “The 1619 Project ... aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.”

The text of the online version still claims, “[T]he year 1619 is as important to the American story as 1776. That black Americans, as much as those men cast in alabaster in the nation’s capital, are this nation’s true 'founding fathers.'"

Most importantly, the print edition, which they cannot revise, still contains this entire passage:

It is not a year that most Americans know as a notable date in our country’s history. Those who do are at most a tiny fraction of those who can tell you that 1776 is the year of our nation’s birth. What if, however, we were to tell you that this fact, which is taught in our schools and unanimously celebrated every Fourth of July, is wrong, and that the country’s true birth date, the moment that its defining contradictions first came into the world, was in late August of 1619? Though the exact date has been lost to history (it has come to be observed on Aug. 20), that was when a ship arrived at Point Comfort in the British colony of Virginia, bearing a cargo of 20 to 30 enslaved Africans. Their arrival inaugurated a barbaric system of chattel slavery that would last for the next 250 years. This is sometimes referred to as the country’s original sin, but it is more than that: It is the country’s very origin.

The Pulitzer Center, which is an “education partner” for the 1619 Project, describes the initiative thus: “The 1619 Project … challenges us to reframe U.S. history by marking the year when the first enslaved Africans arrived on Virginia soil as our nation's foundational date."

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In other words, even those who support the project most firmly understand its core thesis to be that 1619 is the date of America’s true founding because America was founded on slavery. Yet the New York Times magazine is no longer willing to stand by that idea. It has quietly amended the language of the online version, and its founder claims now, despite abundant evidence to the contrary, that she and her brainchild did not say what they very clearly said.

“The wording in question never appeared in the 1619 Project text,” Hannah-Jones said this weekend. “It appears nowhere in the printed copy … It didn't appear in my essay nor any of the actual journalism we produced.”

She adds, “It did appear at some point in some ancillary digital promotion copy, which you know is not journalism and changing promotional copy does not require an editor's note.”

That does not come even close to reconciling her present statements with the project’s language and her past remarks. But this obvious embarrassment is par for the course for the 1619 Project, which has been a disaster since its launch. The online edits come not long after Hannah-Jones inexplicably proclaimed the project, which has been incorporated into many schools' historical curricula, an "origin story" and not a work of history. The edits also come after New York Times magazine editors affixed a major correction to her Pulitzer Prize-winning introductory essay. That editor's note came about only because a fact-checker for 1619 wrote an article for Politico revealing that she was ignored when she noted correctly that Hannah-Jones’s essay contained grave historical inaccuracies.

How’s that for talent and execution?

Tags: Opinion, Beltway Confidential, New York Times, 1776, Racism, Racists, Media Bias, Media Coverage, Pulitzer Prizes

Original Author: Becket Adams

Original Location: The 1619 Project is a fraud

Journalist Zaid Jilani criticizes NYT's 1619 Project .
Journalist Zaid Jilani said on Hill.TV that the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project from The New York Times misconstrues the civil rights movement's role in reforming the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1965."The civil rights movement was quite tertiary to the passage of this law, it wasn't the main priority for them," he said. "The passage of the law wasn't about race at all. In the 1619 Project they say the law upended the racist quota system, but actually, it wasn't based on race, it was based on national origin.

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