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Opinion An illustrated look at Minneapolis as the world waited for the Derek Chauvin verdict

11:05  21 april  2021
11:05  21 april  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd 's death enters its third week Monday, with the state nearing the end of a case built on searing witness accounts, official rejections of the neck restraint and expert testimony attributing Floyd's death to a lack of oxygen. Derek Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s May 25 death. Police were called to a neighborhood market where Floyd, who was Black, was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit bill.

While the nation paused for the reading of the guilty verdict against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin -- and many rejoiced -- activists say now is a moment to keep moving forward in addressing racial injustice.

MINNEAPOLIS — A former police officer who pressed his knee into George Floyd’s neck until well past Mr. Floyd’s final breath was found guilty of murder on Tuesday in a case that shook the nation’s conscience and drew millions into the streets for the largest racial justice protests in generations. The verdict , which could send the former officer, Derek Chauvin , to prison for decades, was a rare rebuke of police violence, following case after case of officers going without charges or convictions after killing Black men, women and children. At the center of it all was an excruciating video, taken by a teenage

I'm Mike Thompson, the cartoonist, and illustrator for USA TODAY. I grew up in Minneapolis, not far from where George Floyd died.

a man wearing a hat: Chanting, © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Chanting, "I am somebody," Michael Ingram of Minneapolis pumped his fist in celebration outside the Hennepin County Government Center after the verdict was announced.

I came home this week to visit my mom, to see how my old neighborhood and the city have changed. And to wait for the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, which came Tuesday afternoon.

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I've been visiting notable locations — the Hennepin County Courthouse, George Floyd Square (just block from where I went to grade school) — and other spots to draw, make videos and observe.

EXPLAINER: Prosecution explores Floyd's 'spark of life'

  EXPLAINER: Prosecution explores Floyd's 'spark of life' MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors trying a white former Minneapolis police officer in George Floyd’s death put one of Floyd’s brothers on the witness stand Monday in a further effort to humanize him for the jury and counter the defense narrative that Floyd was at least partially responsible for his own death due to his use of illegal drugs. Philonise Floyd, who has frequently occupied the Floyd family's sole seat in the socially distanced courtroom, was allowed to testify under a legal doctrine called “spark of life.

The jury’s guilty verdict on the former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for killing George Floyd signaled the conclusion of a historic police brutality trial and a key moment for policing and for the battle for racial equality in America. Observers have talked about this case being so significant that it will stand as a watershed between the way law enforcement was held to account in the US before George Floyd was pinned by the neck under Chauvin ’s knee, and after. From the time bystander video of that drawn-out death as Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, begged for his life while Chauvin , who is white

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty in the murder of George Floyd on Tuesday. Chauvin was found guilty on all three charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The jury reached its verdict after approximately 10 hours of NBA and WNBA players led the charge in speaking on social justice in the wake of Floyd's murder as well as the murder of Breonna Taylor, and many more lost to police brutality and violence . After the highly anticipated verdict was announced, the world breathed a sigh of relief—including some of the most

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Then the verdict was read.

Here are sketches that capture the mood and atmosphere I've seen so far.

The verdict

Celebrations broke out as soon as the guilty verdict was read. Word spread quickly that former police officer Chauvin had been found guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May.

Chauvin, 45, was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

This illustration used at the top of this article came after I spent time with the people celebrating and managed to record a video of the mother-daughter hugging. Use the slider to see how a hug turned into an illustration.

a group of people around each other: Brianna Raine (left) and her mother Marvalyn Raine, both of Chicago, embrace outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis immediately after the verdict was announced. © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Brianna Raine (left) and her mother Marvalyn Raine, both of Chicago, embrace outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis immediately after the verdict was announced.

I also saw people's raw reactions, which included a man pumping his fist and a woman reflecting on what had just happened.

Defense set to take turn in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Defense set to take turn in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The defense for a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd's death was set to start presenting its case Tuesday, following 11 days of a prosecution narrative that combined wrenching video with clinical analysis by medical and use-of-force experts to condemn Derek Chauvin's actions. Prosecutors called their final witnesses Monday, leaving only some administrative matters before they were expected to rest Tuesday. Once the defense takes over, Chauvin attorney Eric Nelson is expected to have his own experts testify that it was Floyd's drug use and bad heart, not Chauvin's actions, that killed him.

Minneapolis Attorney General Keith Ellison. When I became the lead prosecutor I asked for time and patience to review the facts, gather evidence and prosecute for the murder of George Floyd to the fullest extent that the law allowed. That long hard painstaking work has culminated today. In this case, at least, we have our answer. But if we're being honest with ourselves, we know that true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial. True justice requires that we come to terms with the fact that Black Americans are treated differently, every day.

Derek Chauvin has been convicted of murder for killing George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes, a crime that prompted waves of protests in support of racial justice in the US and across the world . The jury swiftly and unanimously convicted Chauvin of all the charges he faced As the guilty verdicts were proclaimed, he closed his eyes and nodded his head repeatedly. “I was just praying they would find him guilty. As an African American, we usually never get justice,” he said immediately afterwards. Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, said in a statement: “Justice

a close up of a person wearing a costume: Shannon Gavin of St. Paul held her hands to her heart outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis shortly after the verdict was announced. © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Shannon Gavin of St. Paul held her hands to her heart outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis shortly after the verdict was announced.

Before the verdict was read

George Floyd Square was eerily quiet as closing arguments were delivered.

The intersection where the 46-year-old died was filled with memorabilia — flowers, stuffed animals, signs. The display was one of many found throughout the square.

text: Some of the hundreds of stuffed animals left in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Some of the hundreds of stuffed animals left in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. text: Graffiti in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Graffiti in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis a close up of a sign: Road construction barrier in George Floyd Square © Graffiti on a road construction barrier in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. Road construction barrier in George Floyd Square a sign on a pole: Sign in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Sign in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis

More Chauvin trial coverage

  • The entire country needed a guilty verdict
  • Black lives do matter – this is history for America
  • Derek Chauvin was convicted, but the public still hasn't won
  • Reform after Chauvin convicted: Doing the right thing is contagious

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: An illustrated look at Minneapolis as the world waited for the Derek Chauvin verdict

DOJ weighs charging Chauvin for 2017 incident involving Black teen: Source .
Federal investigators probing Derek Chauvin's use of force against George Floyd are also weighing charging him for a 2017 incident involving a Black teen, a source said. The videos, from Sept. 4, 2017, allegedly showed Chauvin striking a Black teenager in the head so hard that the boy needed stitches, then allegedly holding the boy down with his knee for nearly 17 minutes, and allegedly ignoring complaints from the boy that he couldn't breathe.

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