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Opinion Derek Chauvin is guilty of George Floyd’s murder. This artwork captures the emotion of Minneapolis' reaction

14:40  21 april  2021
14:40  21 april  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd 's death enters its third week Monday, with the state nearing the end of a case built on searing witness accounts, official rejections of the neck restraint and expert testimony attributing Floyd's death to a lack of oxygen. Derek Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s May 25 death. Police were called to a neighborhood market where Floyd, who was Black, was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit bill.

I'm Mike Thompson, the cartoonist, and illustrator for USA TODAY. I grew up in Minneapolis, not far from where George Floyd died.

a man wearing a hat: Chanting, © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Chanting, "I am somebody," Michael Ingram of Minneapolis pumped his fist in celebration outside the Hennepin County Government Center after the verdict was announced.

I came home this week to visit my mom, to see how my old neighborhood and the city have changed. And to wait for the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, which came Tuesday afternoon.

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I've been visiting notable locations — the Hennepin County Courthouse, George Floyd Square (just block from where I went to grade school) — and other spots to draw, make videos and observe.

EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs

  EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge overseeing the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd said Monday that he'll leave it up to the jury to sort out whether Floyd yelled “I ate too many drugs” or “I ain’t do no drugs” as three officers pinned him to the ground. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill made the ruling as attorneys argued over whether to allow the testimony of a use-of-force expert for the prosecution, Seth Stoughton, a professor at the University of South Carolina Law School. Prosecutors wanted him to testify from an academic perspective on whether Chauvin used reasonable force and about national policing standards.

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Then the verdict was read.

Here are sketches that capture the mood and atmosphere I've seen so far.

The verdict

Celebrations broke out as soon as the guilty verdict was read. Word spread quickly that former police officer Chauvin had been found guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May.

Chauvin, 45, was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

This illustration used at the top of this article came after I spent time with the people celebrating and managed to record a video of the mother-daughter hugging. Use the slider to see how a hug turned into an illustration.

a group of people around each other: Brianna Raine (left) and her mother Marvalyn Raine, both of Chicago, embrace outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis immediately after the verdict was announced. © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Brianna Raine (left) and her mother Marvalyn Raine, both of Chicago, embrace outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis immediately after the verdict was announced.

I also saw people's raw reactions, which included a man pumping his fist and a woman reflecting on what had just happened.

The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill.

  The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill. While Judge Peter Cahill allowed cameras in the courtroom for the first time in Minnesota state history, he's also been strict on other matters.That is exactly where Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill finds himself in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, entering its sixth week and bringing daily controversy and scrutiny to every step taken in the courtroom.

a close up of a person wearing a costume: Shannon Gavin of St. Paul held her hands to her heart outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis shortly after the verdict was announced. © Mike Thompson/USA TODAY Shannon Gavin of St. Paul held her hands to her heart outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis shortly after the verdict was announced.

Before the verdict was read

George Floyd Square was eerily quiet as closing arguments were delivered.

The intersection where the 46-year-old died was filled with memorabilia — flowers, stuffed animals, signs. The display was one of many found throughout the square.

text: Some of the hundreds of stuffed animals left in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Some of the hundreds of stuffed animals left in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. text: Graffiti in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Graffiti in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis a close up of a sign: Road construction barrier in George Floyd Square © Graffiti on a road construction barrier in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. Road construction barrier in George Floyd Square a sign on a pole: Sign in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis © Mike Thompson, USA TODAY Sign in George Floyd Square in Minneapolis

More Chauvin trial coverage

  • The entire country needed a guilty verdict
  • Black lives do matter – this is history for America
  • Derek Chauvin was convicted, but the public still hasn't won
  • Reform after Chauvin convicted: Doing the right thing is contagious

Follow Mike Thompson's work at USA TODAY, on Instagram and Twitter.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Derek Chauvin is guilty of George Floyd’s murder. This artwork captures the emotion of Minneapolis' reaction

DOJ weighs charging Chauvin for 2017 incident involving Black teen: Source .
Federal investigators probing Derek Chauvin's use of force against George Floyd are also weighing charging him for a 2017 incident involving a Black teen, a source said. The videos, from Sept. 4, 2017, allegedly showed Chauvin striking a Black teenager in the head so hard that the boy needed stitches, then allegedly holding the boy down with his knee for nearly 17 minutes, and allegedly ignoring complaints from the boy that he couldn't breathe.

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This is interesting!