•   
  •   
  •   

Opinion What do Native Americans really think about Thanksgiving?

17:06  24 november  2021
17:06  24 november  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Thanksgiving's real history, Macy's parade, 3 NFL games: 5 things to know Thursday

  Thanksgiving's real history, Macy's parade, 3 NFL games: 5 things to know Thursday It's Thanksgiving in the U.S., the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade returns to form, Week 12 of the NFL season begins and more to start your Thursday.For many Native people, Thanksgiving represents the dark shadow of genocide and the resilience of Native people, rather than peace and shared prosperity between Native Americans and Pilgrims. "To most Natives, Thanksgiving is not a celebration," said tribal citizen Dennis W. Zotigh, who is also a writer and cultural specialist at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

The first Thanksgiving is generally regarded in history as a friendly gathering among pilgrims and the Wampanoag Tribe.

a person standing in front of a truck: Members of Blackfeet Food Distribution, Blackfeet Fire Management and Chief Mountain Hotshots put together and handout over 5,000 Thanksgiving meals, during a drive-up distribution event on Monday afternoon in Browning, November 23, 2020. © RION SANDERS/GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE Members of Blackfeet Food Distribution, Blackfeet Fire Management and Chief Mountain Hotshots put together and handout over 5,000 Thanksgiving meals, during a drive-up distribution event on Monday afternoon in Browning, November 23, 2020.

But as we learned from Eryn Dion in last year's edition of This is America, the first Thanksgiving actually has a fraught history, as the pilgrims later violated their agreements and attacked and encroached upon Wampanoag lands. This brutality was not uncommon — upon arrival in America, Europeans broke promises and inflicted violence, disease and assimilation against Native people nationwide for generations.

How the American Right Claimed Thanksgiving for Its Own

  How the American Right Claimed Thanksgiving for Its Own Pass the free enterprise, please.Making use of excerpts from Plymouth Colony Gov. William Bradford’s journals, all of these pieces tell roughly the same story about “the real meaning of Thanksgiving”: the Pilgrims went to Plymouth in 1620 with a utopian vision of holding property in common, but after being mugged by the reality of two years of poor harvests and starvation, they abandoned collectivism for capitalist individualism. These articles conclude in roughly the same way: The lesson of the first Thanksgiving was that “socialism does not work; the one and only source of abundance is free markets.

I'm Nora Mabie, a reporter focusing on Indigenous communities for the Great Falls Tribune, part of the USA TODAY Network. And, of course, you're reading This is America, a newsletter about race, identity and how it shapes our lives.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

The question we pose this edition: What do Native Americans think about Thanksgiving? The Great Falls Tribune surveyed more than 40 Indigenous people across 12 tribes. For some, Thanksgiving is a day to honor ancestors and be with family; for others, it's a stark reminder of oppression.

But first, race and justice news we're watching

  • Native food is more than a Thanksgiving spread. What Indigenous chefs want you to know about their incredibly diverse cuisine.
  • Jury deliberates verdict in Ahmaud Arbery's death. Here are key moments from the trial.
  • How to navigate those uncomfortable questions at your holiday dinner table
  • Native Americans are winning at the Supreme Courtwith help from Justice Gorsuch
  • Breaching the 'psychological contract'? Working on holidays can damage mental health
  • Women would be required to register with the Selective Service if this amendment becomes law

Here's what Indigenous people said about Thanksgiving

(Responses are edited for length and clarity).

What NFL games are on Thanksgiving in 2021? TV schedule, times, channels for all three games

  What NFL games are on Thanksgiving in 2021? TV schedule, times, channels for all three games Thanksgiving Day will feature three games in 2021. As always, the Lions and Cowboys will be in action.The NFL is entering its 16th season of scheduling three games for Thanksgiving Day. Only two games were played last year. The night game between the Steelers and Ravens was postponed because of COVID-19 concerns, but the Lions and Cowboys continued their decades-long streak of playing on the holiday.

Kasey Salois, 24, Blackfeet and Little Shell: Thanksgiving may have started out with the pilgrims, but we have made it our own. We can't change the past but we can't let it define us either. This holiday is less about celebrating the past for us and instead celebrating what we have and what we can look forward to. We do a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, and we have a lot to be thankful for.

Jason Rosette, 45, Chippewa Cree: Thanksgiving means eating with your family, and because of that, I'm grateful. But I feel the truth needs to be told about how America was really founded. It was founded on the murder of my ancestors and the robbery of our land. The only way we can overcome historical trauma is by teaching the truth in schools.

David Coldwell, 63, Blackfeet: I used to celebrate, but I no longer will. Had I known the real history, I never would've celebrated. I didn't learn the truth in history class growing up. Native Americans weren't talked about.

When did the Thanksgiving Day NFL tradition start? Lions, Bears, Cowboys history and games

  When did the Thanksgiving Day NFL tradition start? Lions, Bears, Cowboys history and games Every year, on Thanksgiving Day, three NFL match-ups take place filled with big action and division rivalries, and this year is no different. First, the Chicago Bears head to Ford Field to take on the Detroit Lions in Michigan (12:30 p.m. ET) followed by a matchup between the Las Vegas Raiders and the Dallas Cowboys at AT&T Stadium (4:30 p.m. ET). Then at 8:20 p.m., the Buffalo Bills will battle it out with the New Orleans Saints in a special Thanksgiving edition of Sunday Night Football on NBC. Live coverage of that game begins at 7:00 p.m. ET with Football Night in America and will also be available via live stream on Peacock.

a group of people standing on top of a car: Members of Blackfeet Food Distribution, Blackfeet Fire Management and Chief Mountain Hotshots put together and handout over 5,000 Thanksgiving meals, during a drive-up distribution event on Monday afternoon in Browning, November 23, 2020. © RION SANDERS/GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE Members of Blackfeet Food Distribution, Blackfeet Fire Management and Chief Mountain Hotshots put together and handout over 5,000 Thanksgiving meals, during a drive-up distribution event on Monday afternoon in Browning, November 23, 2020.

Lilly Juneau, 18, Fort Peck Sioux: I celebrate it in the name of family and remembrance of my ancestors. It's also a sad day reflecting on the atrocities that happen to Native people.

Brandy Unruh, 43, Confederated Salish and Kootenai and Cree: I have mixed feelings on Thanksgiving. I have two sides because my dad's family came through Ellis Island, and my mom's family was Bitterroot Salish and Cree. Without them, I wouldn't be here, so I focus on the positive. I love the holidays because we get a break from work and school to spend time with our families.

Leslie Stump-Meyers, 35, Chippewa Cree: Celebrating the colonization of Indigenous people is sad. Instead, we celebrate by remembering what our ancestors went through and how they persevered.

Kirby Drake, 36, Crow: It's somber, but I like the food. I definitely don't partake in the common myths of the Natives and pilgrims being friends. Instead, I focus on gratitude.

More Native American chefs are opening restaurants -- with future generations and sustainability in mind

  More Native American chefs are opening restaurants -- with future generations and sustainability in mind Native American eateries still remain rare due to challenges linked to a history of trauma and colonization. But Indigenous chefs say it's important to share their cultural traditions where they can. "This is something that needs to be represented for our next generation," Wahpepah said.Why are there so few Native restaurants?Sean Sherman, an Oglala Lakota chef, began The Sioux Chef as an Indigenous food education business and catering company.

Matt Wacker, 49, Blackfeet, Haida, Tlingit and Cherokee: I give thanks for what my ancestors survived over many generations. I'm proud but also saddened by their struggles and the lack of acknowledgment by the broader population.

Sunni Grotberg, 20, Little Shell: I love Thanksgiving. I'm familiar with the horrific events after the first Thanksgiving, but I choose not to let hatred fester. I believe it's important to know and remember what happened in the past so we don't repeat the same mistakes, but it's equally important to forgive.

Sunni Grotberg (center and holding her son) loves Thanksgiving. While she acknowledges past atrocities, Sunni likes to focus on forgiveness. © Courtesy of Sunni Grotberg Sunni Grotberg (center and holding her son) loves Thanksgiving. While she acknowledges past atrocities, Sunni likes to focus on forgiveness.

Rachel Wilson, 44, Little Shell: My family celebrates Thanksgiving in honor of the kindness and generosity the Indigenous people showed the Europeans.

Heather LaMere, 38, Chippewa Cree: This holiday started out as a gathering between different nations. There were hidden intentions, but we, as Native Americans, have grown. I do feel happy and blessed by Thanksgiving, as it allows me to give thanks not only to my family and friends but to my ancestors as well.

Yolanda Swearinger, 64, Blackfeet: My family never celebrated Thanksgiving, so when I was in school, I found it odd — the idealism that the pilgrims and Natives shared a table with an abundance of food and we all got along. Our reality is so different, and nowadays, I educate my grandchildren on our history and what we Natives have done for this world.

When Is the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade? 2021 Date, Route and Schedule

  When Is the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade? 2021 Date, Route and Schedule New York City's annual parade will allow in-person viewings this year after being closed to spectators in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic.Will Coss, the parade's executive producer, said: "For our 95th celebration, we are delighted to return this cherished holiday tradition closer to its original form as we march down the streets of New York City and into the homes of a nationwide audience," during a statement released in September.

Jasmine RunningRabbit-Bercier, 24, Blackfeet: I love Thanksgiving. My family hasn't been together in years, and this is the first Thanksgiving we'll all be together. I'm excited and ready to be around my loved ones.

Carma Corcoran, 65, Chippewa Cree: I don't celebrate the holiday. It makes me angry and sad.

Debra Upham, 65, Blackfeet: I feel like it was the beginning of the end of our way of life. It started on the East Coast and quickly moved west. For me, it's just a meal.

Dion Ontiveros, 52, Chippewa Cree: We celebrate it as a gathering with family. Historically, this holiday is built on lies. Natives were murdered by the millions after helping and teaching the white men.

Ahanu Boyle, 20, Blackfeet: I don't like Thanksgiving. I still get together with friends and eat food, but we celebrate the resilience of Indigenous people instead, and we make Indigenous dishes.

---

Nora Mabie is the author of the First Nations newsletter from the Great Falls Tribune. You can expect a special edition of First Nations on Saturday, where she'll highlight some Native artists we can support for Small Business Saturday. You can sign up for the First Nations newsletter here.

This is America is a weekly take on current events from a rotating panel of USA TODAY Network journalists with diverse backgrounds and viewpoints. If you're seeing this newsletter online or someone forwarded it to you, you can subscribe here. If you have feedback for us, we'd love for you to drop it here.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: What do Native Americans really think about Thanksgiving?

U.S. Thanksgiving Feast Estimated to Cost 14 Percent More This Year Thanks to Inflation .
The American Farm Bureau said that an average Thanksgiving feast for 10 people will cost around $53.31 this year, an unusual increase.The American Farm Bureau said that an average Thanksgiving feast for 10 people will cost around $53.31 this year, a 14 percent increase from last year. Staples of this sample include turkey, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie with whipped cream, a vegetable tray and rolls.

usr: 1
This is interesting!