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Politics Supreme Court welcomes the public again, and a new justice

09:00  03 october  2022
09:00  03 october  2022 Source:   msn.com

Supreme Court starts new term in political spotlight, tilted right

  Supreme Court starts new term in political spotlight, tilted right An empowered conservative majority of the Supreme Court begins a new term next week replete with cases that could reshape how the country considers social issues such as race in elections and higher education, after decisions from the last term brought the justices to the forefront of the nation’s politics. The justices will hear arguments […] The post Supreme Court starts new term in political spotlight, tilted right appeared first on Roll Call.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is beginning its new term, welcoming the public back to the courtroom and hearing arguments for the first time since issuing a landmark ruling stripping away women’s constitutional protections for abortion.

FILE - The U.S. Supreme Court is seen, March 18, 2022 in Washington. The Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday, Oct. 3. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - The U.S. Supreme Court is seen, March 18, 2022 in Washington. The Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday, Oct. 3. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Monday's session also is the first time new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the court's first Black female justice, will participate in arguments. And the public is back for the first time since the court closed in March 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Abortion ruling intensifies fight over state supreme courts

  Abortion ruling intensifies fight over state supreme courts Surrounded by states with abortion bans that took effect after Roe v. Wade fell, Illinois is one of the few places where the procedure remains legal in the Midwest. Abortion-rights supporters are worried that might not last. Their concern is shared in at least a half-dozen states, and this year it's not just about state legislatures. In Illinois, Democrats hold a supermajority, and the governor, a Democrat, is expected to win reelection. Instead, Republicans could be on the verge of winning control of the Illinois Supreme Court, where Democrats currently hold a 4-3 majority.

The court’s overturning of the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade abortion decision is still reverberating in legal fights over state abortion bans and other restrictions. But a new stack of high-profile cases awaits the justices. Several cases the court has agreed to hear involve race or elections or both, and the court has also agreed to hear a dispute that returns the issue of free speech and LGBTQ rights to the court.

Also hanging over the justices is some unfinished business from last term: the leak of a draft of the abortion decision seven weeks before it was formally announced. Chief Justice John Roberts ordered an investigation, but the court has yet to provide an update.

Jackson, for her part, has been waiting for months to fully begin her new role since being confirmed in April. She was sworn in when Justice Stephen Breyer retired in June, at the end of a term where the court dominated 6-3 by conservatives also expanded gun rights, reined in the government’s ability to fight climate change and blocked a Biden administration effort to get workers at large companies vaccinated against COVID-19. Breyer, a liberal, was on the losing side of those cases, and Jackson is also expected to be in dissent in many of the court's most prominent cases.

Supreme Court to revisit whether Alabama legislature violated Voting Rights Act

  Supreme Court to revisit whether Alabama legislature violated Voting Rights Act The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Merrill v. Milligan on Tuesday, a case over whether Alabama's 2021 congressional redistricting map violates the Voting Rights Act. A federal judge in January ordered the state to draw a new map that includes two majority-black districts, holding that the state's original plan, which only held one such district out of the state's seven, was likely in violation of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, which disallows voting practices or procedures that discriminate on the basis of race.

FILE - The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 14, 2022. The Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday, Oct. 3. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 14, 2022. The Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday, Oct. 3. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Since she was sworn in, however, the court has largely been on a summer break. The justices met privately last week to consider a long list of appeals that piled up over the summer. On Friday, the justices took the bench for a brief ceremony in which Roberts wished Jackson a “long and happy career in our common calling,” the traditional welcome for a new justice.

But Jackson also joins the court at a time of declining public support for the court. Polls following the court's abortion decision have shown a sharp drop in the court’s approval rating and in people’s confidence in the court as an institution. A poll over the summer found 43% of Americans saying they have hardly any confidence in the court, up from 27% earlier in the year.

Black representation in Alabama tested before Supreme Court

  Black representation in Alabama tested before Supreme Court MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The invisible line dividing two of Alabama's congressional districts slices through Montgomery, near iconic sites from the civil rights movement as well as ones more personal to Evan Milligan. There’s the house where his grandfather loaded people into his station wagon and drove them to their jobs during the Montgomery Bus Boycott as Black residents spurned city buses to protest segregation. It's the same home where hisThere’s the house where his grandfather loaded people into his station wagon and drove them to their jobs during the Montgomery Bus Boycott as Black residents spurned city buses to protest segregation.

On Monday, the court is considering an important water rights case that could limit federal regulation under the nation’s main water pollution law, the Clean Water Act.

Other significant cases include a controversial Republican-led appeal that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures. There's also the case of a Colorado website designer who says her religious beliefs prevent her working with same-sex couples on their weddings. Next month, the justices will hear a challenge to the consideration of race in college admissions.

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Follow AP’s coverage of the Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court

Biden's trying to expand abortion access through Medicaid, but even blue states aren't using the plan before midterm elections .
President Biden encouraged states to use Medicaid to expand abortion access. But two months in, no states have, and advocates await midterm results.As midterm elections approach, even a Democratic majority in the House and Senate might not be enough to preserve abortion access.

usr: 1
This is interesting!