•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Ex-GOP strategist slams Trump for 'assassination instructions' against McConnell: 'It's beyond the pale. Every Republican ought to be able to say so.'

09:50  03 october  2022
09:50  03 october  2022 Source:   businessinsider.com

Lawyer pleads guilty to involvement in Capitol riot after he was identified through TikTok videos

  Lawyer pleads guilty to involvement in Capitol riot after he was identified through TikTok videos 66-year-old David Johnston from Summerville, South Carolina, pleaded guilty to his role in the Capitol riot and was charged alongside his neighbor.The conviction was related Bannon's refusal to comply with the House committee investigating the attack on the Capitol on January 6, 2021. A jury found him guilty on two counts, each of which carry a maximum sentence of one year in prison and a $100,000 fine. His sentencing is set for October 21.

Former President Donald Trump, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Joe Maiorana/AP Photo © Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Joe Maiorana/AP Photo Former President Donald Trump, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Joe Maiorana/AP Photo
  • Conservative pundit Scott Jennings said Trump had sent "assassination instructions" about McConnell.
  • Jennings said "every Republican ought to be able to say" that Trump's post was "beyond the pale."
  • "This is bad for the party," Jennings said.

Conservative pundit Scott Jennings said "every Republican" should be able to disavow former President Donald Trump's "assassination instructions" against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Mitch McConnell's biggest challenge: Is the "Grim Reaper" nearing the final curtain?

  Mitch McConnell's biggest challenge: Is the Mitch's legacy is a damaged Senate and a thoroughly corrupted Republican Party. Losing in 2022 could be the end Mitch McConnell, with the shadow of a grim reaper Photo illustration by Salon/Getty Images

Jennings, a former GOP advisor and McConnell aide, was referring to a Truth Social post from October 1, in which Trump escalated his long-standing feud with the Kentucky senator. Trump accused McConnell of opposing him because he has a "death wish." Trump also leveled a racially charged insult at McConnell's wife, Elaine Chao, the transportation secretary for the Trump administration, calling her McConnell's "China loving wife, Coco Chow."

Trump's salvo came after McConnell voiced support for changing the way Congress counts electoral votes.

In an appearance on CNN on Sunday, Jennings said Trump's post contained "assassination instructions" directed at McConnell and "blatant racism" against Chao.

"I mean, if you read that whole thing out loud, if you were on the street, and you heard someone muttering that on a street corner, you wouldn't say, 'Hmm, let's hand this person the presidency or the Republican nomination for president,'" Jennings said. "You would say, 'Call 911.' Because it sounds like an unhinged, deranged person has gotten loose and is out on the street and may be a danger to themselves and others."

Trump intensifies attacks on McConnell with 'death wish' remark on his social media platform

  Trump intensifies attacks on McConnell with 'death wish' remark on his social media platform Former President Donald Trump raised the specter of political violence by suggesting Sen. Mitch McConnell had “a death wish” because he had voted with Democrats.In a post on his Truth Social website, Trump asked if McConnell had supported the unspecified bills "because he hates Donald J. Trump, and he knows I am opposed to them.

He added that the insults against McConnell were "beyond the pale" and that "every Republican ought to be able to say so."

"This is not good for the party. It's not good for him," Jennings said, referring to Trump.

Jennings also weighed in on Sen. Rick Scott's hesitation to condemn Trump for writing the post, saying Scott was likely "unprepared" for the question. During an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday, host Dana Bash asked Scott if Trump's comments were acceptable — to which Scott said it is "never, ever okay to be a racist," but stopped short of slamming Trump.

"But there's something very easy about this. And what's easy is to say: 'This is not good. It's not helpful. It's not good politically. It's not good personally. This is bad for the party, bad for the country,'" Jennings said. "And it's not becoming of a former president and somebody who wants to have the job again."

Representatives for McConnell and a spokesman at Trump's post-presidential press office did not immediately respond to Insider's requests for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Posturing and messaging’: What a McConnell Senate majority could look like in 2023 .
WASHINGTON — Mitch McConnell has purposefully steered clear of previewing what policies a Republican-led Senate would prioritize if his party recaptures the chamber in a month. Unburdened by such political calculus, a band of conservative policy mavens have for months been sketching out the most palatable ideas a narrow GOP majority could pursue. The state of play for the Senate remains scrambled, with a bevy of margin-of-error races in Nevada, Wisconsin and Georgia likely to determine which party wields power in 2023. McConnell himself has signaled less confidence now than in earlier months when GOP prospects looked rosier.

usr: 1
This is interesting!