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Politics House weighs Republican bill easing gun restrictions

19:20  06 december  2017
19:20  06 december  2017 Source:   ap.org

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WASHINGTON — The Republican-led House is weighing a bill to make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines, the first gun legislation in Congress since mass shootings in Nevada and Texas killed more than 80 people.

The bill would allow gun owners with a state-issued concealed-carry permit to carry a handgun in any state that allows concealed weapons. Republicans said the reciprocity measure would allow gun owners to travel freely between states without worrying about conflicting state laws or civil suits.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi has accused Republicans of doing the bidding of the National Rifle Association, which calls the concealed-carry law its top legislative priority. Two months after two of the deadliest shootings in U.S. history, Republicans were "brazenly moving to hand the NRA the biggest item on its Christmas wish list," said Pelosi, D-Calif.

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In this Dec. 5, 2017, photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks after House Republicans held a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Republican-led House is weighing a bill to make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines, the first gun legislation in Congress since mass shootings in Nevada and Texas killed more than 80 people. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) © The Associated Press In this Dec. 5, 2017, photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks after House Republicans held a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Republican-led House is weighing a bill to make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines, the first gun legislation in Congress since mass shootings in Nevada and Texas killed more than 80 people. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republicans in the Judiciary Committee combined a bill on background checks with the concealed-carry permits measure, a fact Democrats called unfortunate.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler of New York, the senior Democrat on the Judiciary panel, said it was a cynical maneuver designed to force Democrats to vote against the background check measure.

Nadler and other Democrats say the concealed-carry bill would force those who in live in states with strong gun laws to abide by states with the weakest and most dangerous concealed-carry laws.

After mass shootings, retired military commanders urge Congress to address 'gun violence crisis'

  After mass shootings, retired military commanders urge Congress to address 'gun violence crisis' Fifteen retired military officers urge Congress to pass gun control legislation in wake of mass shootings, saying safeguards won't violate the Second Amendment. Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post In a letter they plan to send to Congressional leaders, the retired commanders, including Army Gens. Wesley Clark and Michael V. Hayden, Navy Admiral Eric T. Olson, Air Force Lt. Gen. Norman R. Seip and Marine Brig. Gen. Stephen A.

The House vote comes as the Senate Judiciary Committee holds a hearing on providing criminal history information to the FBI.

The Senate is considering a bipartisan bill to strengthen the FBI database of prohibited gun buyers after the Air Force failed to report the criminal history of the gunman who slaughtered more than two dozen people at a Texas church.

The Air Force has acknowledged that the Texas shooter, Devin P. Kelley, should have had his name and domestic violence conviction submitted to the National Criminal Information Center database. The Air Force has discovered several dozen other such reporting omissions since the Nov. 5 shooting.

Meanwhile, the Justice Department said Tuesday it is reviewing whether devices that allow semiautomatic rifles to fire faster should be banned. The review comes after the Las Vegas gunman used the so-called "bump stock" devices during the deadly October rampage.

A bid to ban the accessory fizzled in Congress, even as lawmakers from both parties expressed openness to the idea.

Mass Shootings: Five Years After Sandy Hook .
Five years on, CBSN looks at America's attitudes on gun ownership and gun violence are still deeply split along partisan linesFive years on, the gun debate remains as contentious ever, and deeply partisan. On the anniversary of Sandy Hook, CBS News took a poll on on attitudes to guns in America. The results were striking, if unsurprising. Americans who own guns see gun ownership as making America more free & safe. Americans who don't own guns feel the opposite, and are far more likely to describe gun violence in the United States as a crisis.

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