Politics: Mississippi’s open Senate seat has an awfully familiar story - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Mississippi’s open Senate seat has an awfully familiar story

14:57  22 march  2018
14:57  22 march  2018 Source:   msn.com

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And that skittishness has translated to another Deep South Senate race, this one in Mississippi , where all the things they fear could come to fruition. Sen. Thad Cochran (R) is resigning next month over health problems, leaving a rare open Senate seat up for grabs in November.

The Mississippi Senate election is headed for a runoff on November 27 after neither candidate got the majority necessary to win on Election Day. At a press conference on Monday, she responded to questions—among many others, "Are you familiar with Mississippi ' s history of lynchings?"—by

a man standing in front of a store: Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, at podium, appoints state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith, to his left, to succeed fellow Republican Thad Cochran in the U.S. Senate. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, at podium, appoints state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith, to his left, to succeed fellow Republican Thad Cochran in the U.S. Senate. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP)

Ever since Roy Moore lost a Senate seat for Republicans in Alabama, of all places, Republicans have been skittish. They are skittish about nominating a controversial, far-right candidate who turns off mainstream Republican voters, or, worse, who has skeletons in his closet that throw a winnable election. They are skittish about an energized Democratic base. They are skittish about what President Trump's unpopularity means for them.

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The 2018 United States Senate special election in Mississippi took place on November 6, 2018, to elect a United States Senator from Mississippi . The election was held to fill the seat vacated by Senator Thad Cochran when he resigned from the Senate , effective April 1, 2018

Mississippi ’ s open Senate seat has an awfully familiar story . Mississippi governor picks Cindy Hyde - Smith to replace Sen. Hyde - Smith , who would become Mississippi ' s first-ever female senator , would hold the job until a November Hyde - Smith , a 58-year-old beef cattle farmer, served

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And that skittish-ness has translated to another Deep South Senate race, this one in Mississippi, where all of the things they fear could come to fruition. Sen. Thad Cochran (R) is resigning next month over health problems, leaving a rare open Senate seat up for grabs in November. Establishment Republicans fear they may yet again be stuck with yet another lackluster candidate, who could lose to a controversial challenger from the right -- or both of whom are weak enough to lose to a Democrat.

Here's what's going on.

On Wednesday, Mississippi's governor appointed a relative unknown politico, state Agriculture and Commerce Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith, to hold Cochran's seat from April to at least November. Hyde-Smith is expected to run for election in November to keep the seat.

McDaniel to run for open Senate seat in Miss. rather than challenge Wicker

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Mississippi has elected only Republicans to the Senate for the last three decades. But a controversial remark by a Republican incumbent, Cindy Hyde-Smith, could flip one of the state’ s seats . Here’ s how we got here. CreditCreditChris Todd/EPA, via Shutterstock.

Mississippi has elected only Republicans to the Senate for the last three decades. But a controversial remark by a Republican incumbent, Cindy Hyde-Smith, could flip one of the state’ s seats . Here’ s how we got here.CreditCreditChris Todd/EPA, via Shutterstock.

But as The Post's Sean Sullivan and Josh Dawsey report, Republican leaders in Washington were underwhelmed with the pick. Hyde-Smith was a Democrat until 2010. And she's untested in what is expected to be a tough intraparty battle, one that the GOP fears could put this Senate seat in danger.

"Alabama is fresh on everybody's mind," one Mississippi GOP operative told The Fix.

To keep the seat, Hyde-Smith will have to defeat a challenger from the right in Chris McDaniel. He's a well-known state senator and conservative radio host, known for calling Hispanic women “mamacitas,” among other controversial comments. But McDaniel actually beat Cochran in a 2014 primary; he later lost in a runoff.

As The Post’s Robert Costa wrote during that 2014 race, Chris McDaniel “has come to represent everything that establishment Republicans fear about the tea party: He is aggressive, unpredictable and, at times, insensitive — if not offensive — on matters of gender and race.”

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The 2018 United States Senate election in Mississippi took place on November 6, 2018, in order to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the state of Mississippi . Incumbent Republican Roger Wicker was reelected to a second full term, defeating his Democratic challenger

In Mississippi , which has not elected a Democrat to the Senate since 1982, the political conditions are even more forbidding. And while they may be neighbors, Mississippi is not Alabama (Alabama has larger population centers and a larger segment of college-educated voters).

And he has a loyal following. Trump endorsed McDaniel in his 2014 challenge to Cochran, calling him "strong" and "smart."

But McDaniel hasn't exactly returned the favor. Like many Republicans — including Trump's new pick for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo — McDaniel dissed Trump during the presidential primary, saying he wasn't a "constitutional conservative."

When McDaniel originally announced he was challenging Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) this November, Trump endorsed Wicker.

a man and a woman looking at the camera: State Sen. Chris McDaniel. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post State Sen. Chris McDaniel. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP)

Still, if McDaniel wanted to paint himself as a Trump candidate, he probably could, especially since the White House isn't yet a fan of Hyde-Smith.

And that carries with it an eerily similar storyline from Alabama, where Moore managed to win the GOP primary despite Trump endorsing the establishment pick, Luther Strange.

a map with text © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

One other thing to keep in mind that could benefit McDaniel: Because November's election to fill Cochran's seat is a special election, all candidates will run without parties on their ballot, and if no one gets more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two will go to a runoff. If there are a bunch of candidates, McDaniel could benefit by having them splinter the vote.

Some Mississippi Republicans are comforted by a prevailing narrative that McDaniel's time has come and past. If he couldn't defeat Cochran in 2014, with the wind of the tea party at his back, what makes him think he can do it now?

Then there's this reality check even if McDaniel does win: Mississippi hasn’t elected a Democrat to the Senate in nearly three decades, and Trump won the state in 2016 by nearly 18 points.

But we said the same thing about Alabama.

Oklahoma Proposes a Bill That Would Finally Require Kids to Wear Seat Belts .
A bill that would require children under 14 to wear seat belts has passed the Oklahoma House and is on its way to the state senate. Right now, children between the ages of 8 and 13 are allowed to ride in the back seat of cars in Oklahoma without buckling up. HB3026 would outlaw that possibility and require parents to secure children under the age of 14 with seat belts. A bill that would require children under 14 to wear seat belts has passed the Oklahoma House and is on its way to the state senate.

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